Shelf Pin drilling

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sapwood

New User
Roger
I had no problem setting up jig (pegboard) to space holes for shelf pins. However, I did have problem with controlling hole depth. I used these stop collars.

Woodworker Supply cheapos

However, in my experience there are worth less than the $2.99 selling price :crybaby2:Sizes aren't marked on collars, they didn't really fit bits, and the set screw didn't tighten much; therefore the collars slipped. What are my fellow NCWoodworkers using to set depth??? I used cordless drill rather than drill press since the workpiece was large.

Thanks in advance,
Sapwood
 

Splinter

New User
Dolan Brown
I have the same type as you, but don't remember where I bought them. I have use the 1/4" many, many time to drill shelf holes with no problem with slippage. I did have better luck with the holes being smoother using a regular drill bit, not a brad point bit. I think the collar of the stop also fit the regular bit a little better. If I was to do a lot of shelf hole I think I would try to build a jig for a router I saw somewhere.
 

Travis Porter

Travis
Corporate Member
I have a Vermont American set from Lowes. They do pretty well. A lot of times, I put a piece of tape around the bit and just do it by eye from there.
 

DaveO

New User
DaveO
I do the tape trick. I find that the stop collars set screw always ends up in the drill flute and turns up the drill bit :BangHead:

Dave:)
 
M

McRabbet

Blue painter's tape works well, but if you really need to control depth and cannot use your drill press (most allow you to set drilling depth), than tape a piece of 1/4" dowel to the side of your drill so it hits your case sides when the drill gets to the appropriate depth. Some old Black & Decker drills even came with this feature built in.

Rob
 

NCPete

New User
Pete Davio
I seem to recall a Vix-style bit being available in that size? seems it would be hard to drill to deep with one of those.
 

erasmussen

RAS
Corporate Member
If i have 1 or 2 holes to drill i mark the bits, tape paint ect.
But if i have a lot of holes i just cut a peice of copper tubing the right length and slip it over the bit.
 

sapwood

New User
Roger
Thanks folks, that's just the kind of ideas I was seeking. I was using brad point bits and it just wasn't working. With almost 30 holes to drill I wanted to speed things up a "bit". Next time I'll try the wooden dowel, copper tube, or similar jig. :cool:

Thanks,
Sapwood
 

hpetty

New User
Hugh
I've used stop collars succesfully, but it's hit or miss on the quality. I've also used blue painters tape, but it's much less precise.

The simplest method is to drill through the center of a closet dowel rod and then cut it to length leaving the correct amount of your bit exposed.
 

michaelgarner

New User
Michael
dont know if you want to go this route, but you can buy the rockler jig-it, its awsome for shelf template work, if you want to borrow mine i will find a way to get it to you. be blessed bro
 

Steve D

Member
Steve DeWeese
Ditto on the "jig it" I've had mine for years and the combination of that jig with the vix style bit is fast and easy.
 

wapitiscat

New User
Todd Earnhardt
The copper tubing/dowel is a good solution for drill and pegboard. If you have a plunge router, you can make a jig to make use of the Porter-Cable style bushings. The jig I made is a Normie I think but is made by drilling a series of holes along a piece of ply. The holes are same size as the bushing OD. Then, saw down the middle to yield two pieces of ply with half holes. Since the saw kerf (assume a 1/8" kerf with the TS) will "remove" some of the circumference, the result is a radius that kind of flares out so that the bushing fits tight without having to slip in all the way to the halfway point. Anyway .... Flip them so they are back to back and you're good to go. Just set the depth on the routah and commence plunging. Just keep the orientation the same when you move to the opposite side (same as with the pegboard) I make various index and reference marks on mine for positioning. This suggestion is especially useful if it justifies a new tool or bushing set. :-D

Todd
 

DavidF

New User
David
Drill through a wine cork - other un-mentionable benefits too:lol: The cork dosn't mark the surface
 

sapwood

New User
Roger
DavidF said:
Drill through a wine cork - other un-mentionable benefits too:lol: The cork dosn't mark the surface
Cool David, never thought of that. :eusa_thin

Now I can get rid of those wine cork tools and use my cordless. I'm sure loml will be pleased :slap:

Duh, didn't know what a vix bit was :oops:
Woodworking wise, I'm home schooled :mrgreen:

Empowered with new knowledge and the need for more tools,
Sapwood
 

J. Fred Muggs

New User
Fred Ray
Always good advice to keep your eyes open when shopping. I stumbled into the jig-it bits (complete) in both 5mm and 1/4" recently that were mis priced. Got one of each for $3.99 each (less than Rockler wants for the replacement bit). Haven't had the time yet, but I will be making the jig for all future shelf pin drilling at my house.

They had two of each. My son was with me. Sorry, guys they're all gone.
 

FIVEBYFIVE

New User
MICHAEL
Tape trick is good, i use my plunge router. set the pole stop and you got perfect hold depth, could use guide, but would have to make jig hole size larger for what ever size guide you use.
 
J

jeff...

Pegboard and 1" dowel and cordless drill, is what I use as a shelf pin jig. works great if the bit doesn't slip in the drill.
 
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