Two words:

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Monty

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Monty
FIRST . . . PASS


:cool:





Here are some more detail pics: (click the thumbnails to see full-size pics)

. . .
 

DaveO

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DaveO
That looks pretty fine to me. As I said before if you can build the jig, you can use the jig. Now what are you going to make with it????? And when can we see the pics?? Great job as usual, Dave:)
 

Monty

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Monty
Thanks. I just realized when I was looking at those pics that I didn't assemble the two pieces correctly... I flipped one of the pieces over and now it looks like this:




:cool:
 

cloudancer

New User
Greg Dake
Any thoughts or have you seen plans for a circular saw jig for doing that?

I know it sounds odd, but I'm currently thinking about using box joints on my next tank... but I can't quite imagine running 10'x36" plywood over my table saw on edge8-O.
 

DaveO

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DaveO
Cloudancer, I've used very careful layout and a Bosch jigsaw to do nice box joints on larger pieces. You might consider that. Or a jig that would hold your ply vertical, and another to keep the circ saw square and try making shallow kerf cuts. Dave:)
 

Monty

New User
Monty
cloudancer said:
I can't quite imagine running 10'x36" plywood over my table saw on edge8-O.
Why not? You can make a dedicated jig for the job, with a higher fence for support, and clamp the vertical board to the fence. It would be a pain, but I think it could be done.

<I'm assuming you meant 10", not 10' :) >
 

Phillip

New User
Phillip Fuentes
cloudancer, if indeed you meant 10" there is no reason not to do it on the tablesaw. see page 87 of Yeung Chan's 'Classic Joints with Power Tools', it should be available at border's, b&n, woodcraft, rockler, etc. he uses a tablesaw sled with a high back fence, there are plans in the book. by the way, for all you power tool guys, this book is really amazing and it has lots of joints besides finger joints.

insomniac, looks great. can't wait to see what's next.

phillip
 

cloudancer

New User
Greg Dake
insomniac said:
<I'm assuming you meant 10", not 10' :) >
Well the model is 40", the full thing is 10' or 120" ... I've actually been thinking about the problem for a while now and today I think I struck on an idea using a router and straight bit. Hard to explain but I'll try to draw it up this weekend.
 

cloudancer

New User
Greg Dake
DaveO said:
Cloudancer, I've used very careful layout and a Bosch jigsaw to do nice box joints on larger pieces. You might consider that. Or a jig that would hold your ply vertical, and another to keep the circ saw square and try making shallow kerf cuts. Dave:)
Esentially that's what I was thinking about doing. Today it dawned on me that I could build a jig and run a router with a straight bit in it to do the cuts. Effectivly the jig would form a "table" on top of the board to run the router on.
 

cloudancer

New User
Greg Dake
DaveO said:
Make sure you use a backer board or you'll tear out the ply. DAMHIKT!!! Dave:)
I hadn't thought of that.. and it would cause some naughty words I think. I should be able to do it, just one more thing to account for.
 

Monty

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Monty
cloudancer said:
sorry for the thread hijack.
Hey, I don't care where you post it... I just want to see what a 10' long tank looks like!!! Please keep us posted!
 

cloudancer

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Greg Dake
insomniac said:
Hey, I don't care where you post it... I just want to see what a 10' long tank looks like!!! Please keep us posted!
I will but its a big project of which the tank is only part. I'm hoping to get the scale model going in the next month or so...
 

Monty

New User
Monty
Hey, I REALLY like those! That's just the kind of inspiration I needed!

What did you use, spalted maple and.... cherry? I've still got some walnut lying around (heartwood, that is!)
 

Joe Scharle

Joe
Corporate Member
African mahogany, purpleheart tray sides and the spalted maple came from the log pile. It's has cherry color because I cheat and stained with Sedona Red to hurry things along. I built that same box jig last year and switch it from router to TS depending mostly on pin or board size. It's funny because I made my first one from walnut and it was so pretty that my brother whinned until I gave it to him. This one is red oak, ugly as a barn door so I think it will stay here!

Joe
 

DaveO

New User
DaveO
Bladeburner, those are beautiful boxes. How are the spalted maple panels held in the frame? Dave:)
 

Joe Scharle

Joe
Corporate Member
The spalted maple panels float in the 3/8" lid frame. Rout a wrap around dado in the panel edges and picture frame the the whole thing. I used the plan from American Woodworker March 2005. Very clear and easy to follow.

Joe
 

DaveO

New User
DaveO
I think I saw that issue. So basiclly the frame fits into the maple panel? Seems simple enough. I thought the difference in thicknesses was to great for a typical raised panel set-up. Thanks, Dave:)
 
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