Mitered Frame ?

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Canuck

Wayne
Corporate Member
I am probably over thinking this a little, but............

When cutting mitered frames, we all know that the two horizontal and the two vertical pieces of the frame must be the exactly the same length. In the past, when working with frames of roughly 5 x 7, 8 x 10, 11 x 14 etc. (standard photo sizes), I could easily attach a stop block on my jig fence and ensure the same length of horizontal (ie 10") and vertical (ie 8") pieces of the frame when I cut the mitre's.

Now. I have a frame I want to make that is around 16" x 36".

What would be wrong with stack cutting the horizontal (36") pieces and cutting at the same time?

I could double stick tape the two pieces together, cut a mitre, then measure off exactly 36" and cut the opposing mitre. Walla. Two 36" horizontal pieces of the frame exactly the same length!:wsmile:
(No need for a stop block.) Then do the same for the vertical 16" pieces.

(I have assumed of course that my sled fence is set exactly to 45 degrees to the blade which I will check with a digital angle gauge)

I would also be cutting through 1 1/2" of material though.

Is there any reason that anyone can think of where this wouldn't work?:dontknow:

(Stop blocks do rule, but when the stock exceeds the length of the fence, this is about all I can think of to try.)

Thoughts?

Thanks,

Wayne
 

MIKE NOAH

New User
Mike
Don't know about possible tear out due to current profile or with further machining but as far as getting a square frame sounds like a plan to me. :icon_thum
Mike
 

PChristy

New User
Phillip
Wayne, I feel your pain - I have done several larger frames where I did excatly what you are talking about - but without the 2xtape - I long for a place big enough for a miter station/table - I believe that as long as you have the saw to handle the thickness and give you a true cut I do not see anything wrong - make sure you have a way to support you long pieces while cutting
 

FredP

Fred
Corporate Member
I do it all the time without the tape. so long as the saw can handle it and the blade is sharp it works.:thumbs_up
 

steviegwood

New User
Steven
I do the same thing even on small frames and without the tape. That long I would tape together though to prevent slippage. Steve
 

Gofor

Mark
Corporate Member
I have found that stop blocks are only as reliable as the stiffness of the wood dictates. longer on thin pieces does not mean as accurate.

I agree with Glenn on the method. When cutting the rails and stiles for my grand-niece's hope chest, I stacked the matching pieces to ensure they were the same. I also do this on any mitered frames. Equal length is critical for a square frame.

That said, I have also used a longer aux fence on my miter gauge with stop block to get the initial cuts close. Best method I have found if mitering after molding.

Go
 

junquecol

Bruce
Senior User
Sounds like a great reason to pick up a "Dubby" from Jerry Cole at the Charlotte Woodworking Show in March. His stop works both short and long, just by reversing it in the fence. Micro adjustable also.
 

ehpoole

Administrator
Ethan
Just for others who might be reading this thread...

But you can also attach a homemade auxillary fence with stop-block to your miter gauge when needing to cut duplicates -- even for 36"+ cuts. As for me, I am a bit spoiled with my Incra 1000SE Mitre Gauge -- with telescoping stop block built in (though 36" is just a hair long for it without attaching an auxillary fence).

Just be aware that when stack cutting (whether it be horizontally or vertically stacked) any error in either your mitre guage angle or tablesaw's bevel angle will be amplified by the extra depth of the cut, making one of the boards a hair longer or shorter than the other. If everything is perfect, then they will be identical in length, but if there is error then there will be a small difference.

PS - Don't forget to attach photos of your new frames when complete.
 

Canuck

Wayne
Corporate Member
Just for others who might be reading this thread...

But you can also attach a homemade auxillary fence with stop-block to your miter gauge when needing to cut duplicates -- even for 36"+ cuts. As for me, I am a bit spoiled with my Incra 1000SE Mitre Gauge -- with telescoping stop block built in (though 36" is just a hair long for it without attaching an auxillary fence).

Just be aware that when stack cutting (whether it be horizontally or vertically stacked) any error in either your mitre guage angle or tablesaw's bevel angle will be amplified by the extra depth of the cut, making one of the boards a hair longer or shorter than the other. If everything is perfect, then they will be identical in length, but if there is error then there will be a small difference.

PS - Don't forget to attach photos of your new frames when complete.

Ethan.

Most of this frame will end up hidden. I am putting together a base for a toy chest I am building for my grand daughter.

I ended up just stack cutting (with double sided tape) on my old Craftsman 12 CMS.

A longer axillary fence on my crosscut sled or the Incra is a good idea as well. I have made them in the past for the Incra with a piece of MDF and some cap screws and square nuts securing it to the OEM Incra fence.

Here are a couple of pictures of the frame after I slotted for biscuits, glued and clamped. (Tight enough for me for this application.:wsmile: (Sorry for the lousy pictures!:embarrassed:)

100_27231.jpg




100_2721.jpg



When this sets up, I will be profiling the outside edge a bit, mounting bun feet at the corners with T-nuts and setting this toychest on top with about 3/16" reveal around the outside of the box.

100_2708.jpg


Thanks everyone for your mitering tips!

I will post some pictures of the final product within a week or so. (Grand daughters 1st birthday is on Jan 16th, so I have a little more time!)

Wayne
 
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