milled wood

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kclark

New User
Kevin
I have some white oak that I bought from a man with a woodmizer mill. The boards are fairly square to start with but not exact. It is not like buying rough lumber from Woodwurth with at least 1 square face on it. What is the best way for me to start. My oak is flat and straight, no curls, bends or warping. I have my jointer and a brand new dewalt 735 planer that I picked up tonight ready to go.
 

Bigdog72

New User
Geoff
Bring it all to my house and, for a %, I will show you! :gar-La;

I am not an expert but here's what I do:

1. Flatten one side on the jointer
2. Flatten one edge on the jointer
3. Flatten other side on planer
4. cut to width on tablesaw

This works for boards that will fit on your jointer. If you have a 6" jointer as I do you will have to joint one edge the best you can and then rip the board before you start the steps above. I always cuss my 6" jointer when I have to do this but I don't have room for a bigger machine. :banana:
 

bluedawg76

New User
Sam
All I would add is to first cut the boards down to usable lengths. For this, I x-cut the boards to what I'll actually be using ~1" or so. I do this w/ either a sled on the TS, or a circular saw for big, heavy, unruly boards that wobble! There's no sense in straightening stock you don't intend on using.
Then as bigdog said, joint 1 face (cup face down, grain going uphill), then plane (grain going downhill). Once the stock is flat, but not to final dimension, take off equal amounts with the planer (i.e. flip the faces as you plane). I typically leave boards as thick as possible. I then joint one edge after planing so that I can orient the grain on straighest/ best edge pointing uphill. Then off to the TS for ripping

You may also consider getting the wixey thickness gauge for your planer. It's well worth it!

Sam
 

Sully

New User
jay
My normal order: 1) face joint, 2) plane to thickness, 3) edge joint.

If you plane to thickness before you edge joint, it makes it easier to deal with grain orientation along the edge since you can put either face against the jointer fence.

$0.02
J
 

Fred85

New User
Josh
You can also build a sled for your planer so it can act as a jointer like this one

Granted i've never used a jointer in my life, but this seems to take out the human error factor in jointing curved/cupped/twisted stock...and who doesn't like jigs? :icon_thum
 

jdulaney

New User
John
Put the wood on the joiner so that the cupping points up. There is ALWAYS cupping.

Do this so that the board is not rolling around.

I don't see any reason to cut the boards to length first. I used to handle thirty foot pieces of 8/4 sixteen inch wide WO with no issues.
 

kclark

New User
Kevin
I don't see any reason to cut the boards to length first. I used to handle thirty foot pieces of 8/4 sixteen inch wide WO with no issues.

+1 to a better man than I . If not tongue and cheek, I want to know how since I am currently trying to mill WO 16" wide except I am a smaller man using 11' ers.:icon_cheers
 

merrill77

Master Scrap Maker
Chris
I don't see any reason to cut the boards to length first. I used to handle thirty foot pieces of 8/4 sixteen inch wide WO with no issues.

One reason is this: if a long board has a significant bow to it, you may end up with only 1/4" thick board by the time you get it straight and flat. When you cut that same board down to lengths that approximate the final parts, you can frequently still get close to the optimal thickness out of it. This depends on the length of the board, the amount of bow and the length of the final desired part, of course.

For me, the first step in the process is to use the planer to take just enough off each side of the board to read the grain and look for defects. I can then lay out my parts for the best appearance and grain match, label them and cut to rough length (& width, if needed) and then face joint and plane. I leave the final trimming to length and width until I'm in joinery and assembly phase - double checking that the length in the plans, for example, is what I actually need. This approach optimizes yield and appearance but might take a bit more labor.
 

bluedawg76

New User
Sam
Out of curiosity regarding the weight, I used the hardwood nc shipping calculator to calculate:

30' x 16" of 8/4 = 78 bd ft.

78 bd ft of wo weighs in at about 312lbs. I can't imagine trying to wrestle that on to my jointer, or through my planer...:help:.. Some photos of this process would be awesome to check out!

Sam
 

Alan in Little Washington

Alan Schaffter
Corporate Member
I have some white oak that I bought from a man with a Woodmizer mill. My oak is flat and straight, no curls, bends or warping.

Yes, but, when did he cut and mill it and is it dry to 10% MC or less? If not, stack, sticker, and weight it down until it is at least at equilibrium moisture content for your shop!
 

Gofor

Mark
Corporate Member
Out of curiosity regarding the weight, I used the hardwood nc shipping calculator to calculate:

30' x 16" of 8/4 = 78 bd ft.

78 bd ft of wo weighs in at about 312lbs. I can't imagine trying to wrestle that on to my jointer, or through my planer...:help:.. Some photos of this process would be awesome to check out!

Sam

No problem: You just hire Dave)'s shop elves. Oops, that's right, they moved over to Fred's now :rotflm::rotflm:

Go
 
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