Zinnsser Shellac

Ptofimpact

Pete
User
Have a small can of Zinnsser shellac, when I opened it, the cap Popped about 2 feet in the air.
This happen to anyone?
 

Pop Golden

Pop
User
I've used Zinnsser Shellac for years never had an experience like that. I've now switched to Zinnsser SaelCoat. SealCoat is very good Shellac, but it's only 2 lb. cut (thinner makes for better spraying), It's dewaxed (almost anything goes over it.) Also it seems to last longer. All this aside I don't have an answer to the exploding shellac.
 

llucas

luke
Senior User
no pop tops, but i have had an unopened can of Zinsser shellac spring a leak in the bottom...quite the mess in the cabinet
 

BKHam

Bradley
User
no pop tops, but i have had an unopened can of Zinsser shellac spring a leak in the bottom...quite the mess in the cabinet
i have had the leak happen as well. never got it all the way cleaned up. my shelf will forever have shellac in teh corners.
 

Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
I've also had leaking cans of Zinsser SealCoat. Shellac is very slightly acidic so I guess there's some corrosion in the metal can over a couple of years.

Pop-top? Maybe the ethanol solvent for the shellac has built up pressure if the can gets pretty warm sitting on the shelf (172 degrees F).
 

Charles Lent

Charley
Corporate Member
I had another brand of shellac pop the top as soon as I began to pry on it. The shellac had a funny smell and a test on a board indicated that it would no longer dry correctly. It was tossed. I've recently had a can of Zinsser Sealer spring a leak at the bottom and empty itself in my paint cabinet, but I've never had a can of their shellac go bad. I just recently finished off about 1/2 qt of their orange shellac that was over 3 years old, and it was fine with no funny smell or drying problems.

From my experience, if the top pops off like that I would toss it.

Charley
 

Ptofimpact

Pete
User
It was sure odd, and the shellac is fine, used it, dried fine, clear. Probably will toss the rest, dont want it popping again
 

Oka

Oka
User
Could be differential pressure . I have had cans of other things pop up (not 2 feet) but the cause was from either being opened or packaged at a different elevation or packaged at a different temperature. If something is packaged at 60 deg and heated to 80 deg the inside pressure will increase ...... Guy-Lussac or Charles laws on gas , one of those guys I don't really remember anymore. This is especially true with things that have solvents in them... more temp sensitive. my 2-¢
 

drw

Donn
Corporate Member
no pop tops, but i have had an unopened can of Zinsser shellac spring a leak in the bottom...quite the mess in the cabinet
I have had the same experience...a very aggravating mess! At the time I thought it was simply an unlucky incident, but it seems this is an issue that many of us have experienced. All of which makes me wander it Zinsser is using cans that are too thin and/or aren't coating the can's interior with a compound resistant to the apparent corrosive affects of the shellac!
 

Oka

Oka
User
In my business, we get cans of lacquer based paints and they sometimes eat through the can and leaks ...... I think you ar right the can are not
properly lined so they corrode away.

I have had the same experience...a very aggravating mess! At the time I thought it was simply an unlucky incident, but it seems this is an issue that many of us have experienced. All of which makes me wander it Zinsser is using cans that are too thin and/or aren't coating the can's interior with a compound resistant to the apparent corrosive affects of the shellac!
 
Last edited:

Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
Just my two cents, but I have tried these Z products several times. The effort needed to get a professional looking finish landed the almost full can to be thrown away each time.

There are so many professional options, leaving a superior durable finish done in less than a fraction of the time when compared.
 

sawman101

Bruce Swanson
Corporate Member
I've had the leaking can but was gonna put the shellac in a glass jar; now I'm wondering if it will be too much pressure for the jar. This will be a shellac flake in alcohol cut.
 

Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
Just my two cents, but I have tried these Z products several times. The effort needed to get a professional looking finish landed the almost full can to be thrown away each time.

There are so many professional options, leaving a superior durable finish done in less than a fraction of the time when compared.
Can you elaborate on your findings please. I know that you often use a spray lacquer and are you comparing that "professional looking" finish to shellac? BTW, why have you thrown away almost full cans of zinsser shellacs?
 
Last edited:

Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
I've had the leaking can but was gonna put the shellac in a glass jar; now I'm wondering if it will be too much pressure for the jar. This will be a shellac flake in alcohol cut.
It's probably okay. Ethanol doesn't have a very high vapor pressure at room temperature so the pressure buildup shouldn't be very high. Shellac flakes in ethanol is a standard mix, like Zinsser shellacs. It's the can that leads to corrosion and eventual leakage!
 

Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
Can you elaborate on your findings please. I know that you often use a spray lacquer and are you comparing shellac to lacquer?
1.) Spray compressed air HVLP with disposable cups. Approximately $1 to spray all day long or just a few minutes. A few minutes to clean the gun faster than a paint brush cleaning.

2.) High solids two part conversion varnish. First coat dries in 15 minutes for sanding. Light scuff sand 320 grit, to knock down the wood fibers. Spray second coat, dries in 15 minutes for handling. I am done. Three days later nail polish remover, water, food stains, the finish will hold up.

3.) For a second choice, use a pre-cat lacquer. Takes about 15 minutes longer to dry and need three coats. Sand only the first coat.

4.) Third choice just spray Deft brushing lacquer thinned about 25% with lacquer thinner. So easy a kid can do it. Three coats only sand after the first. About one to two hours drying for first coat before sanding, half hour to dry for second coat and a couple of hours after third coat to handle. Great for furniture applications where high durability is not needed.

All those options leave a look comparable to an automotive finish, with options to go flat, satin, semi-gloss or gloss. Deft leaves a silky feel to the hand like no other.
 
Last edited:

Our Sponsors

LATEST FOR SALE LISTINGS

Top