Rubber Feet for Cutting Board

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manfre

New User
Manfre
I built a few cutting boards, but I haven't been able to find a good source for rubber feet. I'm looking for the screw on kind because everything I've read says the adhesive ones fall off too easily. Anyone know a source?
 

mkepke

Mark
Senior User
Your local big-box store should have plenty of variety.

That's where I got the rubber-ish screw-on feet for one of my projects.

-Mark
 

manfre

New User
Manfre
McMaster-Carr has some rubber bumpers, but the choice in non-marring is very limited. I'm tempted to buy the recessed adhesive backed ones and just punch/drill a screw hole. The temperature range of 65F - 150F is a bit worrisome though. I'm assuming below 65F means it'll be more prone to drying and cracking.
 

RobS.

Robert Slone
Senior User
I've found them at the local hardware store as well as big box stores. I've used both the press on kind and the screw on kind. I've never had any problem with the stick on type falling off.
 

bwat

New User
Bill
Lee Valley offers both the clear version Mike lists as well as a brown harder version.
 

merrill77

Master Scrap Maker
Chris
So, out of curiosity, what is the purpose of putting feet on a cutting board? I haven't noticed our boards sliding around on the counter. And we can use both sides of our boards.
 

manfre

New User
Manfre
So, out of curiosity, what is the purpose of putting feet on a cutting board? I haven't noticed our boards sliding around on the counter. And we can use both sides of our boards.

Although the board is flat, the countertop is not necessarily (mine is not). The rubber feet help prevent any rocking, make it easier to pick up, and help prevent it from warping due to a little bit of airflow under it.
 

merrill77

Master Scrap Maker
Chris
Although the board is flat, the countertop is not necessarily (mine is not). The rubber feet help prevent any rocking, make it easier to pick up, and help prevent it from warping due to a little bit of airflow under it.

Hmmm...I wonder if it will still rock with 4 feet? I guess that depends on the nature of the irregularity.

I've never considered (or seen) a triangular cutting board, but since 3 points define a plane....Naaah, a triangular cutting board would be strange. :confused:
 

manfre

New User
Manfre
Hmmm...I wonder if it will still rock with 4 feet? I guess that depends on the nature of the irregularity.

I've never considered (or seen) a triangular cutting board, but since 3 points define a plane....Naaah, a triangular cutting board would be strange. :confused:

Rubber feet squish more than end grain hard maple and only require 4 points to be on the same plane, instead of the entire bottom surface of the cutting board and the surface it sits on. For those of us with an old "builder grade" kitchen, rubber feet will make a difference. Depending on where I place it on my counter, I'm able to easily spin the cutting board you helped me plane.
 

Canuck

Wayne
Corporate Member
Have purchased screw on rubber feet from out local ACE hardware store. Pretty pliable white rubber that worked well on the end grain boards I did.

Wayne
 

ScottM

Scott
Staff member
Corporate Member
Thinking out loud but could you go with wooden pads? Just made of a softer wood then the cutting board.
 

Bas

Recovering tool addict
Bas
Corporate Member
I use this kind of self adhesive bumpers:
21UiMKRnP5L._SL500_AA300_.jpg
I've never had one fall off in 5+ years, and I use/ wash my end grain cutting board almost daily. I've given away dozens and nobody has ever reported a bumper becoming unglued. I know, multiple anecdotes don't make reliable data, but don't believe everything you read on the Internet.

After applying the oil/ wax finish, I take a paper towel, dab a little mineral spirits on the area where the bumper needs to go, and remove any finish that's on the surface. Dry with the other side of the paper towel and stick on the bumper.

The main reason I stay away from screw-in feet is because you're screwing into end grain. Eventually, those will come out. Epoxying on feet will certainly work, but it also means they can never be removed without damaging the board. My guess is that the wood will last longer than the rubber, so it would be nice if they could be replaced at some point.
 

mkepke

Mark
Senior User
Although the board is flat, the countertop is not necessarily (mine is not). The rubber feet help prevent any rocking, make it easier to pick up, and help prevent it from warping due to a little bit of airflow under it.

Thinking outside the box...

Get a sheet of food-grade silicone, e.g. a silicone pot-holder. Cut out four discs, say 1-2" in diameter. Set, but do not permanently affix these discs in the corners of the board. Tada..removable, hygenic feet that allow you to use both sides of the cutting board and solve your rocking problem.

I'm calling this..err.."BoardStop"

-Mark
 

Woodman2k

New User
Greg Bender
Silicone shower door bumpers from Ace hardware installed with stainless steel screws and flat washers. With a properly sized hole I have never had one foot come loose on 200+ boards. If something is out of wack you can vary the depth you drive the screw and therefore get the feet even and get the rock out of the board on your counter. The flat washer compresses the silicone feet.They work great and the assortment from Lee Valley work pretty good also.
 
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