Grizzly 6 inch jointer cleanup.

RedBeard

Burns
Corporate Member
Did you use a feeler gauge with the straight edge to set the tables parallel?
I used a straight edge and feeler gauges to set the tables and cutter heads. Mine is only 38” so I made a block with a notch out with magnets on the bottom to lock the straight edge down so I can shift it forward to slide forward to check farther back on infeed side of the table. I wish I just had a 50” but I’m working with what I’ve got. Its an idea I got from a Grizzly video about jointer set up tomorrow on YouTube.
 

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'74 Jailbreak

New User
jp
Yes, thanks to all. The photos are helpful. Going to change the belt out this weekend. Hopefully the belt fixes the noise. We will get to tuning after I get that and the base rocking settled.
 

junquecol

Bruce
User
That is an 1182 but the older model. I just did a complete tear down on mine. I redid everything but the fence. By the time I got done with everything I was so tired of it I got the fence square and called it good enough. I used the newer 1182 manuals/part lists and worked fine. I did finally find a scanned copy of the old model. I’ll put the link below. Yours appears to have been in much better shape than mine was but it was definitely worth tearing down and rebuilding. There was a lot of heavily pitted rust you where you couldn’t see from the outside. I scrubbed, sanded, and ground for hours. Hind sight being 20/20 I wish I had either gotten it sandblasted or made an electrolysis bath. It would have saved me a ton of time. The best thing about tearing it down was I was able to vastly improve dust collection on it. The whole area under the cutter head and body is open and has the tube leading out the side where you could attach a dust collector hose. I didn’t used it before because it didn’t do anything for chips flying out around the top and sides. I ended up making a MDF plate that slid flat to the middle of the body casting under the cutter head. I siliconed it to the body and screwed in a dust collector port to the bottom of the box, then ran a short section of 4” hose through the dust chute, and just connect that to my dust collector hose. That has eliminated 99% of all dust/chips. I put a picture below of the under side of the body. Unfortunately I didn’t take one after I put the block and siliconed it in but you can see where I put it.

Now it looks like Grizzly in Jet's clothes. Saw similar paint job many years ago on another forum. Poster used International Harvester White from Tractor Supply, and added the hardener to it.
 

RedBeard

Burns
Corporate Member
Now it looks like Grizzly in Jet's clothes. Saw similar paint job many years ago on another forum. Poster used International Harvester White from Tractor Supply, and added the hardener to it.
I did it that color mostly because I couldn’t find an enamel spray paint close to the Grizzly green. Plus my table saw is a Grizzly with a very similar Whitish color.
 

'74 Jailbreak

New User
jp
I took the cutterhead out this afternoon and cleaned it. I did not remove the knives as I don't have a straightedge or micrometer on hand to properly set them. Also, all three of the 12 mm wrenches I have are too thick to access the knife locking bar bolts. Is that bar and bolts that lock the blade into the head called the jib?

I have to admit, I'm intimidated by setting and adjusting those knives. I'm going to take the cutterhead into a local shop to have the knives removed and sharpened. I plan on having them sharpened and set back uniform at the same height they are now.
 

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RedBeard

Burns
Corporate Member
I took the cutterhead out this afternoon and cleaned it. I did not remove the knives as I don't have a straightedge or micrometer on hand to properly set them. Also, all three of the 12 mm wrenches I have are too thick to access the knife locking bar bolts. Is that bar and bolts that lock the blade into the head called the jib?

I have to admit, I'm intimidated by setting and adjusting those knives. I'm going to take the cutterhead into a local shop to have the knives removed and sharpened. I plan on having them sharpened and set back uniform at the same height they are now.
I had the same problem with a wrench for the jib bolts. I bought a cheap one from Home Depot and used the belt on my combination sander to grind it thin enough to fit inside. I would be interested to hear if they can actually reset the knives to identical positions, and then lines back up correctly when you reinstall.

When running boards was everything coming up square and flat? Setting the blades is intimidating at first and Extremely time consuming when first trying to figure it out but not that hard once you get into it. I bought a $20 igaging snap height gauge from Klingspor’s to set my blades when I did the last one. My blades are definitely not as perfect as I wanted but close enough for me.
 

'74 Jailbreak

New User
jp
Getting the machine shop to line up those blades after a sharpening is probably wishful thinking on my part. This is still part of the extended clean-up from having just purchasing this jointer. I haven't cut a board on it yet. The knives had some nicks in them or I was just going to leave the head in place and run it once I replaced the belt and checked the out-feed table.

My thought process was that it is more important that the blades all be square to each other and the same height along the full length of the blade at top dead center than getting them back in the same exact place in the cutter-head. Not sure how much circumference is reduced after a sharpening. If they're set as described, I'm hoping to be able to make sure the out-feed table is set correctly to the blade and make a test cut. There were no shims beneath the bearing blocks.
 

junquecol

Bruce
User
Our own Bob Vaughan has a video on setting jointer blades. Been around for years. Google setting jointer blades and several systems will show up. I use John White's method, which uses three magnets glued to two pieces of plywood.
 

'74 Jailbreak

New User
jp
The cutterhead knives are out getting sharpened so I went ahead with some more cleaning. The old cutterhead bearings were shot so I pulled them off and then pressed on some new NTN bearings and cleaned up the cutterhead. I went ahead and took both tables off the dovetail mount and then took the mount off of the base for a thorough clean and inspect.

Is there anything the forum can think of that I should be doing while I have this thing disassembled? I plan on building a mobile base for it while the base is nice and light.

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JeffN23

New User
Jeff
I just purchased an old style 6" G1182 locally and the spring for the guard is missing. It has the black knob on top of the guard. I ordered a spring from Grizzly but what I got must be for the newer style. I have scrubbed the internet for a drawing, picture or reference to the spring for the old style and can't find anything. Would one of you with that style machine be willing to pull our guard off and take some photos of the spring and how it mounts? Some measurements would be helpful also since it looks like I might need to go to Mcmaster for a generic replacement. ID and OD of the spring, wire diameter, left or right winding and leg angle seem to be the variables.
Thanks in advance for any help I can get.
 

RedBeard

Burns
Corporate Member
I posted a link to the old style 1182 manual earlier in this thread (I think posting #13) but I just opened it up and here is a screenshot of the part numbers I think you’re looking for. But that said you don’t have to use exact parts. My spring/chain/cotter pin were all busted. I installed a new cotter pin, bought a couple different lengths of springs at Lowe’s, and tried until i found one that worked. It took about 5 minutes plus whatever time I spent at Lowe’s. I did not install Any kind of chain back just a longer spring.
 

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JeffN23

New User
Jeff
Gentlemen,
Thanks a lot for the photos and the advice. I had it in my head that it was a torsion spring set up. When I got the jointer all that was there was the cotter pin with a zip tie through it. I spent a fair amount of time trying to sort out how a torsion spring interfaced with any of it. Reality is pretty simple it seems. I was on my way to Lowes when I got these posts so the timing was perfect. I picked up a couple springs and now everything works.
 

RedBeard

Burns
Corporate Member
good deal. The newer version manual will give you most of the information you need, but if there's something like that the old manual is the only way to find it. It took me forever to find it, but i printed out a copy and have the link saved now so I go to it whenever I had a question during my restoration. It's been great since I got it put back together. The motor is dual voltage and I'm about to convert it over to 220 and replace the switch. I know it doesn't technically give it more power, but I just did the same thing with my table saw and made a world of difference in power. There must be more pulling off the 120 circuit I had it on because the power difference was pretty substantial. Hopefully it is the same with this.
 

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