Fixing Loose fitting tenons - when to glue or when to add more wood

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sgtdave

New User
Dave
Hello Everyone,Guys, I have a problem with some loose tennons. If the tennons are almost OK, that is, if they are too loose so that they slide out but don’t have much play or wiggle can they be glued or is there a glue that will help fill the small gap and make a good joint? OR… do I have to repair by adding wood to the tennon and refitting.Are there any other solutions out there?Help!
 

Bill Clemmons

Bill
Corporate Member
I think you have a couple of options here.

1. If the tenons slip in and out easily, but don't really have a lot of play in them, then I would go ahead and glue them w/ regular wood glue. If after the glue is dry, you are still concerned about the fit, you can always go back and insert a dowel. Personally, I like the look of "pegged" tenons, but if you don't want the peg to be seen, you may be able to insert if from the back side.

2. You might try using a urethane based glue (e.g. Gorilla Glue) which expands as it cures and has some gap filling properties.

3. Use a thick epoxy to glue the tenons in place. This will take up some of the slack.

If none of these options appeal, there is always the piece of wood spacer you mentioned.

HTH

Bill
 

pviser

New User
paul
Yea, we've all done that at one time or another: removed too much wood. In this case, I would either add a layer of wood and refit the tenon, or I would use a slow-set epoxy. Either way, it will take more time than getting it right the first time by creeping up on the final thickness and doing the last bit with sandpaper, custom fitting each joint. I certainly have discovered this painful truth -- it's easier to remove wood than to add it back -- in a variety of woodworking situations.
 

Jeff

New User
Jeff
Dave,

You may be okay. Been there and done that myself. Insert the tenon into the mortise joint and rotate the pieces upside down. Does the tenon slide out of the mortise by gravity alone? If so, a little tenon reconstruction by gluing on one or more veneer type strips is probably needed and the final fit is easy with a sanding block to get a snug, but not tight fit. It should just wiggle in with a little hand pressure. Check the tenon to shoulder fit by eye. :confused:

Mistakes & how to fix 'em ~ Part 1 ~ Tenons - Construction techniques

PM me with your email address if you want some other info that I can't attach to this reply.
 
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