Carolina Waterfowl Rescue needs help fom Woodworkers

Skymaster

Jack
Senior User
Jeff If we can figure out how to make it useable, I will make a run. I have no idea what sizes are there. Mainly I know they are cutoffs, shorts, culls etc bottom of barrel stuff. will be a while b4 I can do it, I am down hard with vertigo problems so driving right now is a no go
 

Skymaster

Jack
Senior User
Hank, looks close to 7 bd ft per duck house. Maybe you can contact Scott and see what we can get in syp rough, seems bout the least cost material. How many we want to make needs to be decided, best guess is about 10 dollars a pc
 

bspeller1

New User
peanut
Hank, looks close to 7 bd ft per duck house. Maybe you can contact Scott and see what we can get in syp rough, seems bout the least cost material. How many we want to make needs to be decided, best guess is about 10 dollars a pc
Hey guys just reading your post and need for cedar or white oak. I have a small sawmill operation just outside of Greenville NC. I have some ERC that I can mill if that's what you are having to resort to. I maybe able to find some cypress also. If interested let me know and what total BDFT you think will be needed
.
 

JackLeg

Reggie
Corporate Member
Hank last time I tried running green and wet I had to STOP and dry out all the water that was accumulating in my planer/jointer.literally puddles of water. IF we had a place that could get it under cover and air dry it for next year great or someone who has a kiln that could dry it. This is rough lumber, it would have to have some machining to make useable once dry enough. Keep inside rough instead of cross hatching would be ok, outside i think smooth would shed water better. right now I am having some issues that would prevent me from driving out there but once fixed I could make the run
Skymaster is spot on here! And, drying "shorts" can be a real PITA, and I speak from experience! Stickering short pieces gets really challenging. Hate to hear Ivy is closing. He was my source.
 

Matt Furjanic

Matt
Senior User
Wow, thanks for all the interest and participation about the Duck boxes.
I think this is a good cause.
If we can come up with some lumber, the rest is pretty straightforeward.
Jeff: we can probably use some yellow pine, but it will probably not last for more than a couple seasons, as I think it is suseptable to rot.
 

Hmerkle

Board of Directors, Vice President
Hank
Corporate Member
I see the real problem that the design requires 10 and 12 inch boards.
Meaning either 1. glue-up or 2. VERY expensive lumber

I have a line on some cypress and will see it later this week or early next - what is in stock is 8 inch, I want to see what I can do with it.

It is #2 grade (the cheapest) at $1.56 bd.ft but if the boxes require 10 board feet, that is $15.60 just in lumber costs per box - so $1500 - $1600 for 100 boxes...
 

Skymaster

Jack
Senior User
I think i may have thunked of a solution, T111 siding 4x8 sheets. we can slice and dice em and they are ruff inside and out. no glue ups.Price may be close but rip em to size xcut em assemble done. I we presume 6 bd ft per, that gets 5 boxes per sheet. 34 bucks a sheet at home depot about 7 bucks per unit
 

bowman

Board of Directors, Events Director
Neal
Staff member
Corporate Member
Jack, i think 10 bd ft per box is what I saw, assuming they are 12" wide. I like the idea of the T111 though.
 

Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
The plans that I've looked at (Audobon, etc) specify 1" t cypress or cedar but maybe pine will work. However, we probably can't afford that if we're going to make and donate more than 50-100 nest boxes. I don't know if the wood ducks will use boxes made from T11 plywood siding. Just something to consider before we jump in there.
 

Hmerkle

Board of Directors, Vice President
Hank
Corporate Member
The plans that I've looked at (Audobon, etc) specify 1" t cypress or cedar but maybe pine will work. However, we probably can't afford that if we're going to make and donate more than 50-100 nest boxes. I don't know if the wood ducks will use boxes made from T11 plywood siding. Just something to consider before we jump in there.
Why do you think the duck might not use boxes made from T111?
 

Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
Why do you think the duck might not use boxes made from T111?
I was just thinking out loud and violated the idea "think before speaking". I found some other information below. We're good to go with T11.

From the South Carolina Dept of Natural Resources.



Rough sawn, cypress, pine or cedar lumbers are good choices as a nest box building material. If smooth or dressed lumber is used, be sure to tack a piece of mesh screening to the inside under the entrance hole. This will enable day-old ducklings to climb up and exit with the brood when the hen calls from the water below. All nest boxes should be checked each winter prior to the nesting season to replace nesting material, check the tightness of the predator guard and secure the lid and screen door latch. Production inspections should be made as often as possible during March through June, but at least once in April or May.
Specifications for Wood Duck Box Construction
Materials

  • Rough cut cedar, yellow pine or cypress boards 1" thick are preferred, but exterior plywood is an acceptable substitute. DO NOT use treated lumber.
  • Weather resistant latch on the side flap that opens for maintenance (ex. 2" zinc hook & eye)
  • Zinc coated 1 1/2" inch wood screws
 

Hmerkle

Board of Directors, Vice President
Hank
Corporate Member
I was just thinking out loud and violated the idea "think before speaking". I found some other information below. We're good to go with T11.

From the South Carolina Dept of Natural Resources.



Rough sawn, cypress, pine or cedar lumbers are good choices as a nest box building material. If smooth or dressed lumber is used, be sure to tack a piece of mesh screening to the inside under the entrance hole. This will enable day-old ducklings to climb up and exit with the brood when the hen calls from the water below. All nest boxes should be checked each winter prior to the nesting season to replace nesting material, check the tightness of the predator guard and secure the lid and screen door latch. Production inspections should be made as often as possible during March through June, but at least once in April or May.
Specifications for Wood Duck Box Construction
Materials

  • Rough cut cedar, yellow pine or cypress boards 1" thick are preferred, but exterior plywood is an acceptable substitute. DO NOT use treated lumber.
  • Weather resistant latch on the side flap that opens for maintenance (ex. 2" zinc hook & eye)
  • Zinc coated 1 1/2" inch wood screws
COOL!
Thank you for checking - now to determine how much / how many we could get out of a T111 sheet
 

Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
COOL!
Thank you for checking - now to determine how much / how many we could get out of a T111 sheet
A sheet of 3/4" t ply is about 24 board feet and here's the Skymaster's estimate.

I we presume 6 bd ft per, that gets 5 boxes per sheet. 34 bucks a sheet at home depot about 7 bucks per unit
 

Skymaster

Jack
Senior User
sheet is approx 32 sq ft, minus the overlap edges call it 30.just did numbers again and Bowman is correct, 9.08 bd ft so 10 is the number. possible 3 houses per sheet right back to approx 15$ plus hardware
 
Last edited:

Steve_Honeycutt

Chat Administartor
Steve
Corporate Member
T111 is available on FaceBook Marketplace in Mocksville NC (west of Winston Salem) for $22 per sheet. The seller claims to have 700 sheets.
 

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