Start of a cyclone build

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Warren46

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Warren
Last Saturday I picked up a load of scrap someone had left in the woods behind our house (car hood, old stove, other scrap iron). I had today off for President’s day so I hauled it out to C & C Metals in Marshfield and traded it for a 4 X 8 sheet of 22 gage steel. While I was there I also picked up 10 feet of one eighth by 2” X 3” steel tube to make a 52”+ guide for my table saw fence. When all was said and done it cost me $26 plus the scrap.
I have a good friend (Terry Hefield) out a JAARS in Waxhaw who is an aircraft engineer. They have lots of tools at JAARS including a 48” slip roll and power shear. The first step was to lay out the cone from the Bill Prentz website. With Terry’s help the lay out was a snap.
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A couple of cuts on the shears and the two straight sides are cut. Then a few minutes with the tin snips and the cone was cut out.




Now several passes through the slip roll putting a little more curve on each time.


Tape it up with a little duct tape and you can see that the Bill Prentz dimensions and our layout were pretty close to right on.



I picked up some one eight inch pop rivets on the way home from JARRS and I expect to finish the assembly of the cone nights this week.
I am ordering a 15 ½ impeller from Grizzly for $80 and I have a 3 HP 182 Frame motor that should provide plenty of pull through the cyclone when I finish the other parts.
 

Alan in Little Washington

Alan Schaffter
Corporate Member
That should give you a super sucker! :eusa_danc

While it is not a big deal, think about your inlet direction so you overlap the seams on the cone and cylinder in the correct direction for reduced turbulence.

Have you gotten any snake bites yet? :cry_smile I wish I had a slip roller when I made mine!

P10101151.JPG
 

Warren46

New User
Warren
That should give you a super sucker! :eusa_danc

While it is not a big deal, think about your inlet direction so you overlap the seams on the cone and cylinder in the correct direction for reduced turbulence.

I did that. It looks like you soldered your joints. Since my steel is not galvanized I cannot really to that very easily. I am using pop rivets so there will be some turbulence anyway.

Have you gotten any snake bites yet? :cry_smile

Just one little bite on a finger from a sharp burr on a hole I had drilled.
 

Alan in Little Washington

Alan Schaffter
Corporate Member
I did that. It looks like you soldered your joints. Since my steel is not galvanized I cannot really to that very easily. I am using pop rivets so there will be some turbulence anyway.



Just one little bite on a finger from a sharp burr on a hole I had drilled.

Install your rivets from the inside so the nub is on the outside.

Though not as easy, it is possible to solder un-galvanized steel. Just tin the mating edges first, put them together, making sure they mate really well, and re-heat for a good joint.

Also, you can pop rivet it sparingly just to hold the parts in place, then solder or weld the seams, drill out the rivets and seal the holes with solder or Bondo. That is how I did mine. Its not a thing of beauty, but works well and is out of sight anyway.
 
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