Presentation Box Photos

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D L Ames

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D L Ames
I uploaded some photos to my album of a presentation box for a 9 mm pistol I recently completed for someone as a retirement gift. I am in the process of building three more of them now. I will use the same materials for two of them and the third will be made out of some Bird's eye maple and walnut burl veneer.

Now if I can just figure out how to add the photos or a link with this post. :oops:

PresentationBox01_thumb.jpg


PresentationBox02_thumb.jpg


PresentationBox03_thumb.jpg


PresentationBox04_thumb.jpg


PresentationBox05_thumb.jpg


hmmmmmmmm.......I guess that wasn't as hard as I thought it would be.

D L
 

Big Mike

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Mike
Wonderful box, DL. I built the exact same box a few years ago after seeing the plans in one of the magazines. I love the changes you made with the inlaid veneer string at the top and bottom join lines, the lock and the double lift depressions. The veneer does an excellent job of hiding the joins. No matter how I tried I could not figure a way to make those joins disappear. Very well done. Your outfitting of the inside for the pistol is excellent. Nice job! Congratulations!:icon_thum
 

D L Ames

New User
D L Ames
Thanks Mike, I enjoyed making this box and since completing it I have been asked to build three more of them. As you mentioned this is based off of the plans that appeared in Wood Magazine a few years ago. The plans were actually to make a cigar humidor but it was easy to modify to fit my needs. The idea to use the veneer string at the top and bottom joins lines was something I incorporated more from a desire to try my hand at inlaying veneer string. I am glad I did, because as you point out it helped to hide and blend the join lines. It was easy to add, I just ran a 1/8w x 1/32d saw kerf on the TS before I cut the coves and prior to cutting the lid off.

Did you use the box you completed for a humidor or for another purpose?

DL
 

SteveColes

Steve
Staff member
Corporate Member
D L Ames said:
Now if I can just figure out how to add the photos or a link with this post. :oops:
..........
hmmmmmmmm.......I guess that wasn't as hard as I thought it would be.

D L

Did you mean to add the thumbnails or did you want the bigger versions?

And let me add that that is beautiful work.
 
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Big Mike

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Mike
DL, I converted mine into a jewelry box of sorts for my son. Not that he has jewelry but he keeps his watches and what nots in it.

I made mine from Quartersawn Red Oak and I even tried to get pieces that showed quartersawn type grain on the edges and it still was apparent there was a join.

I happen to love that box design. In various sizes and in various woods I have made 4 following that same design.

Yours is just excellent!!!:icon_thum Oh, by the way, excellent is really quite good.:eusa_clap
 

D L Ames

New User
D L Ames
clowman said:
Nice work DL. Tell me, what kind of wood did you use for the top of the box?

Thanks Clay. The top is a piece of 1/4" Baltic birch plywood veneered on both sides with Carpathian elm burl veneer. I ordered the veneer from an online resource out of FL.

DL
 

D L Ames

New User
D L Ames
Big Mike said:
I happen to love that box design. In various sizes and in various woods I have made 4 following that same design.

Mike,
I really like this particular design also. With the coves cut on the top and the bottom as they are it almost makes it appear that the box is floating. It was the first time I tried to cut coves with the TS and found it to be pretty easy.

Did you use a mortised lid support on your box? If so, what method did you use to cut the mortise? I used a spiral up-cut bit mounted in the router table and a couple of stop blocks to control the length of the cut. The only thing I don't like about that technique is that you have to make several shallow passes and I am always afraid I am going to screw up the edge of the mortise as I lower the box back down on to the spinning bit.

DL
 

D L Ames

New User
D L Ames
SteveColes said:
Did you mean to add the thumbnails or did you want the bigger versions?

And let me add that that is beautiful work.

Thanks Steve. And to be honest I was hoping to add the bigger version along with that post.:oops: I tried to follow your "how to add photos" post but I am a firm believer that all of that reading only hurts if you do it.:lol: Therefore, I reverted to the old faithful method of trial and error.

PresentationBox01.JPG



..........See! Trial and error....it works "almost" every time.:eusa_doh:

DL
 

Big Mike

New User
Mike
DL, yes I used the Brusso stops as well, tell me those haven't gotten to be expensive. I also used the lower the box on the bit method and yes it does increase the pucker factor. I actually made a couple of test pieces to practice this technique on until I became accustomed to the forces and what to expect. I still set up stops and do it that way. In one of Doug Stowe's books he makes a jig for inletting the stops and routes them from the top using a template guide bushing. I guess that helps eliminate the "unseen" factor. Oak has to be the most dangerous wood for this dropping on the bit technique as it is more grabby than any of the other woods I've used (walnut, curly maple and cherry). Of course the cherry wanted to burn but otherwise was fine.
 

D L Ames

New User
D L Ames
Big Mike said:
DL, yes I used the Brusso stops as well, tell me those haven't gotten to be expensive. I also used the lower the box on the bit method and yes it does increase the pucker factor. I actually made a couple of test pieces to practice this technique on until I became accustomed to the forces and what to expect. I still set up stops and do it that way. In one of Doug Stowe's books he makes a jig for inletting the stops and routes them from the top using a template guide bushing. I guess that helps eliminate the "unseen" factor. Oak has to be the most dangerous wood for this dropping on the bit technique as it is more grabby than any of the other woods I've used (walnut, curly maple and cherry). Of course the cherry wanted to burn but otherwise was fine.

Mike, that's a big roger on the cost of the Brusso stops. The full mortised lock set was pricey as well but was worth the investment based on what I was using this box for.

I've been thinking about how I could make a jig like you describe to use with a template guide. Thanks for the tip on Doug Stowe's book, I will have to see if I can pick one up. After I finished this box I made a jig to cut the spline slots along the mitered edges that form the box. I made the jig with a fully adjustable 45 degree ramp so I can use the jig for various stock thicknesses. Now all I do is set the edge of the ramp the required distance from the saw kerf on the jig base and elevate my blade to the desired height to cut the spline slot. I figured the jig would come in handy as I build the next three boxes as well as when I work on similar projects I have in mind.

DL
 
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