Overspray On Glasses Lenses

Wiley's Woodworks

Wiley
Corporate Member
Man, did I screw up. I sprayed 4 coats of an oil-based spar urethane on an outdoor garden bench. I used all the precautions, including a suction spray booth. I still got a very light overspray on my glasses. I can still see through the lenses, but it's like looking through a light fog constantly.

The lenses are plastic with special coatings. Directions on the urethane say to use mineral spirits or paint thinner for clean up. The optometrist says polishing may alter the prescription. The overspray is two days old. If you have had success in safely removing overspray from expensive glasses lenses, tell me what you did. Thanks.
 

Robert166

robert166
Senior User
Try vinegar, had some success with that, but before it dried, but still worth a try. I have a coating on my glasses also, (anti reflective I think it is)
 

AllanD

Allan
Senior User
I would start with one of the less aggressive solvents and work up. I would start with denatured alcohol but almost assuredly won't help. Naptha, Xylene, lacquer thinner, acetone. I suspect none of the solvents will do much for cured varnish so on second thought you might try some of the paint removers. Perhaps the citrus based ones or the Safest type (dibasic esters) paint remover. If there is much on the lenses you might not have anything to lose.
 

nn4jw

Jim
Senior User
Just for the heck of it try soaking the glasses in Dawn dishwashing detergent and warm water for about an hour and then wipe/scrub the lenses with straight Dawn on a paper towel. Rinse and dry.

It shouldn't hurt anything and just might take care of it.
 

Mauser44

John
User
I got CA glue on my woodworking glasses. Acetone worked well and did not damage the coating as far as I could tell
 

KenOfCary

Board of Directors, Secretary
Ken
Staff member
Corporate Member
I would go back to the place I bought the glasses or my optometrist if they sell them also and you didn't use a brick and mortar store. Let a professional clean them. That's what I did with a similar problem. They did a great job. If you didn't buy them locally they won't be obligated to clean them for free, but I've found most eye places are very obliging, hoping for new business I guess. Or maybe I just live in an obliging county.
 

Oka

Oka
Corporate Member
Like someone else said Try Dawn but I would put in a sonic cleaner That should cause the coating to fracture and delaminate from the glasses surface
 

Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
The lenses are plastic with special coatings.
Like someone else said Try Dawn but I would put in a sonic cleaner That should cause the coating to fracture and delaminate from the glasses surface
????? The overspray or the coating on the plastic lenses?
 

Tom from Clayton

tom
Senior User
I clean my glasses in a sonicator routinely and use various soaps -whatever i can grab. Cleans the facial oils and sawdust that accumulates between the lenses and the frame.
 

Oka

Oka
Corporate Member
ok beat me up for lack of punctuation. I have used my sonic cleaner to loosen and dislodge a lot of things stuck to item I did not want to mechanically scrub.


 

Tom from Clayton

tom
Senior User
My bad. I thought you were referring to the anti glare coatings that glasses have these days. My grammar is bad enough that even reading it a second and third time I don't see any need for additional punctuation
 

tvrgeek

tvrgeek
User
Had a boss one time who was a real stickler for perfection in our documents. He would come unglued for one too many or one too few comas. A coma when a semi-colon? Bad news. One day he was in a hurry and sent out a quick note. Feeling ornery, we buy committee perfected it with a red pen and returned it to his desk after he had gone home, Needless to say, he was not in a good mood the entire next week.

Most glasses shops say even not to use Windex or any ammonia cleaner as it wil damage the coatings. Only glasses that did not come clean were some cheap readers that got POR-15 on them.
 

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