Gloves when turning?

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Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
Do you wear gloves when turning and what type, where do you get them?

Reason for the question:

Got a small catch, no big deal, kept turning. Saw a couple of drips of blood, small cut, band-aid, no big deal. Eight hours later this thing starts throbbing a bit, go to the doc, finds it but can't get it out, sends me to the emergency room. X-Rays, Ultra Sound, drip with anti-biotics, aneasthetic in the thumb, orthopedic surgeon pulls out a 3/8" long x 1/8" thick (widest part) splinter. That took from 4PM to 10PM in a hospital where I really did not want to be.

Guess it's time for gloves.
 

Rob

New User
Rob
I've used weight lifting gloves, mainly because of the padding. But that's about it. Most of the time I forget to put them on.
 

awldune

Sam
User
I'm sure you have heard the conventional wisdom that gloves at the lathe are dangerous. If the gloves snagged on the workpiece or chuck, your arm could be dragged into the lathe and mangled.

That said, I often see experienced turners on Youtube wearing gloves.

Something like this:
http://www.amazon.com/Wells-Lamont-1140L-Cowhide-Keytsone/dp/B003F12Z22
might be protective and also less snag-prone.

Out of curiosity, what kind of wood were you turning that threw such a splinter?
 

Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
Out of curiosity, what kind of wood were you turning that threw such a splinter?
Cherry. I was using a gouge wich started getting a little blunt, got off the bevel a bit and got the catch. The catch was not big enough to damage my piece and I really did not think much of it.
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
I wear a heavy leather glove on my left hand only. Mostly due to the heat and abrasion of chips and curls blasting my hand. My right hand stays on the tool handle way behind the tool rest and I need the feel and grip of bare skin there.

If I ever take to the stage I guess I'll have to get a sequined glove. :rotflm:
 

Mark Stewart

New User
Mark
When I was turning, like Mike I would ware a single glove(Cut resistant) on my left hand to block the heat from the chips. Glad your ok btw.
 

ashley_phil

Phil Ashley
Corporate Member
Given time and your tolerance for pain that splinter would have worked its way out in a day or so.

I don't use gloves and I really don't think it would be safe
 

manfre

New User
Manfre
No gloves or loose clothing. Cold hands in the winter means that I will not need to apply ice when the piece fractures.
 

batk30msu

New User
brent
While I have not used them turning, I have had good luck with football receiving gloves. They have a very tight fit and a leather palm. You still have maximum feeling (for having on a glove) and they tight fit reduces the risk of loose material getting caught.

http://www.sportsunlimitedinc.com/neumann-original-youth-football-receiver-gloves.html

the pair I wear are like that, the newer ones have a plastic-like composite material instead of leather so I stick with these.
 

merrill77

Master Scrap Maker
Chris
Given time and your tolerance for pain that splinter would have worked its way out in a day or so.
I got a splinter a few months ago...waited for a week to work itself out. Scab formed over it and it hurt more as time went on. Finally went to the doctor - after cutting away the scab she pulled out a tiny brass splinter (from a plumbing fitting).
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
I have one in my finger from 1976, pine about 1/8 by 3/8. No doctor will operate on it. They say as long as it's not hurting anything leave it alone.
 

smallboat

smallboat
Corporate Member
I'm new to turning so this isn't even worth $.02.

I just turned a beetle from a chunk of a black locust I took down last year. (photos to come)
Finished it weighs in at 4 lbs, in the raw it was easily twice that and not exactly balanced.
I centered it up as best I could and turned it as slow as possible.
Still scared to have bare unprotected flesh anywhere near it until I got it round.

Wore some nice leather work gloves and felt adequately but not overly secure.

Its a fine line between protecting yourself and feeling so safe as to get careless.
 

Jim Wallace

jimwallacewoodturning.com
Jim
How fast were you turning? Speed is the one factor that contributes to more injuries on the lathe than any other.
 

smallboat

smallboat
Corporate Member
I'd like to see that for sure.
Will you be wearing the sequined glove?
In all seriousness do give me a call.
I'd like to see the right way to do these things.

Of course relative to the mass of your lathe 25 lbs is nothing.
8 lbs on "the black beauty" is about 15% of the lathe and motor combined.
Had to clamp it to the bench to keep it from walking away.

Still for my total investment in this experiment I'm having a lot of fun and still can count to ten without taking off my shoes.
 
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