Garage heater

dazart

New User
Steve
My workshop is our 2 car garage. Any suggestions on a good heater?

I have a 220 outlet but when I look around the heaters I look at say 240v.
 

Fishbucket

Joe
Senior User
You wouldn't have any issue running on your voltage. they can run on fluctuating voltage. Read the specs on input voltages for that model.

I just run a small 1500 w. heater 24-7 when the mornings will be at freezing temps. I just want to keep things from freezing in the shop.
It's never cold enough to not work in there with just an overshirt on.
 

McRabbet

Rob
Corporate Member
220 is a misnomer -- just as we commonly say a "110 Volt outlet", the actual voltage for the American residential electrical systems are actually 240 Volts AC or 120 Volts AC. Northern Tool make several models of garage heaters that operate on 240 VAC -- you need to check the breaker size and wiring for your existing outlet before you purchase a heater. For example, here is a $90 heater from Northern Tool that provides lot over 17,000 BTU's, but would need a 30 amp breaker and 10 gauge wire. A less efficient model that runs on 120 Volts AC with about 5,000 BTU runs about $55.
 

junquecol

Bruce
User
Seriously look at vent free infa-red gas heatersI. They should already be on clearance by now. I have had one in my shop for years. The air cleaner is on a thermostat, located on ceiling above heater. When heat comes on, so does air cleaner, circulating heat over whole shop. I run my shop around 58 degrees from November till mid March, using an average of a cylinder (20#) per week. I fill my cylinders locally, getting the full 20# for $10 which includes tax. Forty bucks a month is CHEAP to be comfortable when working in the shop!
 
Last edited:

Oka

Oka
Corporate Member
Without getting too wonky/techie 220-240 is essentially the same for single phase 3 phase 240 is something entirely different vs 208-230 3 phase.

Elec heat is expensive energy usage wise.

Gas is cheaper, I would suggest a cheap wall furnace and time fan to push the radiant heat around, that would be cheaper to run..........


My workshop is our 2 car garage. Any suggestions on a good heater?

I have a 220 outlet but when I look around the heaters I look at say 240v.
 

nn4jw

Jim
Senior User
I use a 240vac heater from Northern similar to the one mentioned up thread. Mine is red instead of white, probably because it's been updated.

Anyway, I also have a 2-car garage and I'm not really out there that much when it's really cold. Not because the heater can't keep up but because I just don't feel like it. My heater will heat up the 24x24 first floor in about 20 minutes and I can then work in there comfortably. Yes, it uses more electricity than some other methods but in my case it still costs less per year than paying for a more expensive unit that's more energy efficient. It's also zero maintenance and if it breaks and I replace it I'm still way ahead. I'd feel differently if I was out there every day, I'm sure.
 

Joe Scharle

Joe
Corporate Member
I had the white one in my old shop and it worked well but my feet were cold. I got this one now and can place it on the floor or anywhere the cord allows.

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junquecol

Bruce
User
Strick's Propane in Pittsboro. F&G Distributing in Garner (Loop Rd.) charges about $12. From my house Stricks is a mile closer, plus I don't have to go thru Cary / Raleigh to get there. Stricks requalifies you cylinder without charge with a fill up,
 

Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
Don't like gas in the shop, it adds humidity.

In fact I don't have any gas on my new property, use induction cooking and will never go back.

I have one of those heaters shown above 240V 20A, with fan and thermostat, looks a little nicer than the red one though. Almost brand new and still in original box.

If the original poster wants it, come by and it is yours.
 

junquecol

Bruce
User
Don't like gas in the shop, it adds humidity.
[/QUOTE Can you prove your claim? Humidity from heater helps to off set the dry air from outside. Never in 15 years has anything in my shop rusted because of humidity from gas heater. Check out post in hot deals about Northen clearance sale on Mr Heater wall mounted gas heater.
 

Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
What should I prove?
We know in chemistry that one molecule of methane burned, produces two molecules of water vapor, or one pound of methane burned produces 2.25 lbs of water vapor.
 

junquecol

Bruce
User
What should I prove?
We know in chemistry that one molecule of methane burned, produces two molecules of water vapor, or one pound of methane burned produces 2.25 lbs of water vapor.
OK about methane, but what about propane? Assuming an air change at least twice a day, how many pounds of water would it take for the air in your shop hold just to maintain 45 - 50% relative humidity? A 20# cylinder lasts on average one week. (168 hours) Divide 20# by 168, and you get approx 0.12# of propane per hour. Multiplying that by two, you get about 1/4 # of water per hour. Multiplying that by 24, you get about 6 # of water per day. The drier air entering your shop will quickly absorb this.
 

Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
OK about methane, but what about propane? Assuming an air change at least twice a day, how many pounds of water would it take for the air in your shop hold just to maintain 45 - 50% relative humidity? A 20# cylinder lasts on average one week. (168 hours) Divide 20# by 168, and you get approx 0.12# of propane per hour. Multiplying that by two, you get about 1/4 # of water per hour. Multiplying that by 24, you get about 6 # of water per day. The drier air entering your shop will quickly absorb this.
Without doing the calculations RH in Raleigh is on average 85% in the morning and 52% in the afternoon. If it rains 100%. If you are running a gas heater because it is cold, are you pulling fresh air in all the time, or are the windows and doors closed while the heater is blowing carbon dioxide and water vapor into the shop?
Burning 1 lb Buthane produces 3lbs of CO2 and 1.5lbs of water. If it is raining for a long period and you have a gas heater running in the shop, once you turn everything off, shut the doors and everything cools down, the shop temperature has to drop below dew point. Sorry I did not look up propane.
 

junquecol

Bruce
User
Without doing the calculations RH in Raleigh is on average 85% in the morning and 52% in the afternoon. If it rains 100%. If you are running a gas heater because it is cold, are you pulling fresh air in all the time, or are the windows and doors closed while the heater is blowing carbon dioxide and water vapor into the shop?
Burning 1 lb Buthane produces 3lbs of CO2 and 1.5lbs of water. If it is raining for a long period and you have a gas heater running in the shop, once you turn everything off, shut the doors and everything cools down, the shop temperature has to drop below dew point. Sorry I did not look up propane.
First of November, set heater to hold shop at 58 degrees, 24/7. I found it more comfortable to just set heat, rather than trying to bring it up when I work in there. Dog (14 YO) sleeps in shop on cold nights (below 45,) and I store a couple hundred pounds of sweet potatoes in there. Sweet potatoes don't keep when stored below 55 degrees. As for relative humidity levels, that's not during the colder months. When RH is 100% at 33 degrees, what does that make it when air is raised to 58 degrees?
 

Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
First of November, set heater to hold shop at 58 degrees, 24/7. I found it more comfortable to just set heat, rather than trying to bring it up when I work in there. Dog (14 YO) sleeps in shop on cold nights (below 45,) and I store a couple hundred pounds of sweet potatoes in there. Sweet potatoes don't keep when stored below 55 degrees. As for relative humidity levels, that's not during the colder months. When RH is 100% at 33 degrees, what does that make it when air is raised to 58 degrees?
My new shop is fully AC, which is why I offered the heater to the OP free. My old shop was not conditioned and I used a gas heater a few times. Had to clean up all my machine table tops and keep them waxed after that. Problems with rust. Whatever works for you, I have no gas on my new property, use to love cooking with it until I tried an induction stove top, never looked back.

I keep the new shop at 68F, which what is needed for curing conversion varnish and some veneer glues.
 

FrankK

Frank
User
I also have one of the larger 240 heaters from Northern in my 2 car garage workshop. Even though it is insulated with 6" of foam insulation, rarely will it raise the temperature above 55 degrees. When I have the aerial Jet air filter on, it circulates the air nicely though. Not toasty, but doable except for my hands, which stay on the cold side.
 

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