Dying Tree I.D. - Is this an Elm?

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cpowell

Chuck
Senior User
Found this limb down this morning.



Looking closer the tree is missing a lot of leaves. Somehow I never noticed it was dying.

The limb is pretty big. Cleanup will be a pain. I think I may need to bring down the entire tree unless there's a chance of saving it.

I think it's an elm tree. Here's a pic showing bark and leaves.

The tree has a 125 inch circumference 4 feet above the ground.




Pic of leaves.


I am probably going to get it dropped and get a few of the scout dads to come by and help me cut it into smaller pieces to use for firewood, whatever unless it has any other value. If I can somehow get it cut back or eliminate whatever is infecting it and keep it alive then that's a possibility too.

It's in a good area if it has to be dropped but there is another tree nearby and a fence, neighbor's garden nearby.

It's sad to see the tree dying. At one time this tree provided a lot of shade. I had a swing on it for years that the kids used. I did not see any evidence of lightning damage and no high winds last night. It just couldn't hold the limb any longer.


Chuck
 

Bill Clemmons

Bill
Corporate Member
The leaves and bark certainly look like Elm. Feel the leaves: if they feel "rough" on one side, it's probably Elm. As Scott said, a tree this size is well worth having sawed up, and Elm is a beautiful wood. It has an unusual fleck pattern in the grain which finishes really nice. I've built several pieces out of Elm and would love to have more.

Bill
 

cpowell

Chuck
Senior User
After reading up online and looking at some more pics I think it's a Slippery Elm, sometimes called Red Elm, and is afflicted with Dutch Elm Disease. The bark is separating from the wood.

I don't know if the disease renders the wood useless for fine furniture or not. :dontknow:


Chuck
 

sawman101

Bruce Swanson
Corporate Member
It looks a lot like elm. They do grow, in spite of the Dutch Elm Disease, but usually die after several years. I haven't seen one that large since the disease hit many years ago. If it is elm, many states have prohibitions against transporting it as firewood in an effort to wipe out the disease. It does make nice lumber for many uses. On the other hand, I could be wrong--I often am.:crossedlips:
 

cpowell

Chuck
Senior User
Chuck I'm pretty sure that is a red elm otherwise known as a slippery elm.

http://www.ibiblio.org/pic/NCTrees/slipperyelm.htm

If you can take it have is sawn up into lumber. If it's big enough have it quarter sawn, it's some pretty wood...
Do you have any pics of the red elm you sawed up a few years ago? I got a few sticks but the only thing it's been used for so far was a catapult my son built for a science project.

Some of the stuff you had was really beautiful.

I thought the limb that fell would be all dried out and rotten but most of it seems to be okay.

Here's a pic.




The white/lighter layer of bark is supposed to be used for a lot of different medicinal purposes. Apparently it is combined with honey to make throat lozenges.

The heartwood is more uniform in color than it appears in this pic. I think the limb cross section in this pic is around 12 inch diameter. I'm pretty sure the limb wood will be good fire wood.

I don't know anything about making blanks. What diameter wood would be used for blanks?

In the event I get the trunk wood milled or make some blanks what is an acceptable alternative to anchor seal to coat the end grain? I doubt Rocky Mount will have anything like anchor seal.

Also, what should I use to get rid of the ants, other bugs?


Chuck
 

NCTurner

Gary
Corporate Member
For blanks the should be just 5-8" longer than the diameter and split without the pith. Latex paint has been used as a sealer in a pinch cheap from mis mixes at Borg. I could prob get some AS up your way.
 

Bill Clemmons

Bill
Corporate Member
In the first and second pics of Robert's post above you can barely see the "fleck" pattern in the grain. Wipe on a coat of oil (Tung, BLO, Danish, etc.) and it really pops out. Absolutely beautiful!!!

Bill
 

CrealBilly

Jeff
Senior User
Do you have any pics of the red elm you sawed up a few years ago? I got a few sticks but the only thing it's been used for so far was a catapult my son built for a science project.

Some of the stuff you had was really beautiful.

I thought the limb that fell would be all dried out and rotten but most of it seems to be okay.

Here's a pic.




The white/lighter layer of bark is supposed to be used for a lot of different medicinal purposes. Apparently it is combined with honey to make throat lozenges.

The heartwood is more uniform in color than it appears in this pic. I think the limb cross section in this pic is around 12 inch diameter. I'm pretty sure the limb wood will be good fire wood.

I don't know anything about making blanks. What diameter wood would be used for blanks?

In the event I get the trunk wood milled or make some blanks what is an acceptable alternative to anchor seal to coat the end grain? I doubt Rocky Mount will have anything like anchor seal.

Also, what should I use to get rid of the ants, other bugs?


Chuck
Chuck I had cut up an American elm and sent some pics over to the hobbithouseinc.com owner he posted them under elm. You'll notice the purple hue is quite distinct with American Elm. Red hue is more prominent in Red Elm. There is a good series of [strike]pics[/strike] eye candy over on hobbithouseinc ---> http://hobbithouseinc.com/personal/woodpics/elm.htm


Thanks
 

cpowell

Chuck
Senior User
Chuck I had cut up an American elm and sent some pics over to the hobbithouseinc.com owner he posted them under elm. You'll notice the purple hue is quite distinct with American Elm. Red hue is more prominent in Red Elm. There is a good series of [strike]pics[/strike] eye candy over on hobbithouseinc ---> http://hobbithouseinc.com/personal/woodpics/elm.htm


Thanks
The American Elm pics are impressive. :eusa_danc

I got a few sticks but could not remember whether it was red or Am. elm.

Chuck
 

cpowell

Chuck
Senior User
For blanks the should be just 5-8" longer than the diameter and split without the pith. Latex paint has been used as a sealer in a pinch cheap from mis mixes at Borg. I could prob get some AS up your way.
I'm not sure what you are describing here for blanks. I don't have any blanks in my shop to use as examples. I have only turned spindles/legs, etc, never bowls.

I don't mind setting wood aside and sealing it if it can find its way away from here. LOML is not fond of stacks of logs laying around. :no:

If someone from NCWWer would like to swing by and assist me in a blank cutting/sealing session for a few hours then that would be fine. I don't want to produce a bunch of things that nobody will want or pick up and transport and have them laying around. I believe I will have cheap labor to dispose of the unused wood and don't want to keep stuff around that I end up throwing out later on.

I would like an idea of what size rough diameter log would be usable. If the log is 12 inch diameter and the heartwood is 8 inch diameter then it seems too small to fool with. Is that correct?

There are some bugs to deal with - ants, etc. If the ends are sealed does that take care of the problem?


Chuck
 

sawduster

New User
Robert
I'm scared to death of a chainsaw :embaresse but would be more than willing to hoss around some wood and slap sealer to make blanks if there is enough interest ........i have a big bucket of sealer too :icon_thum
 

NCTurner

Gary
Corporate Member
I'm scared to death of a chainsaw :embaresse but would be more than willing to hoss around some wood and slap sealer to make blanks if there is enough interest ........i have a big bucket of sealer too :icon_thum
+1 Dependant on when:dontknow: Though I have a CS and am not afraid to use it.

If D = 12" cut the log to about 16" the heartwood is wanted just not the pith. about 1" of wood. I would also be happy to take in log form and deal with at my home. Bugs I don't worry about no stinking bugs that is what trash bags are for.
 

cpowell

Chuck
Senior User
+1 Dependant on when:dontknow: Though I have a CS and am not afraid to use it.

If D = 12" cut the log to about 16" the heartwood is wanted just not the pith. about 1" of wood. I would also be happy to take in log form and deal with at my home. Bugs I don't worry about no stinking bugs that is what trash bags are for.
I like your bug perspective. :gar-La;

Someone looked at the tree today and offered to fell it for a modest fee. I am traveling next week so we are looking a few weeks out.

I want to make sure that I have stuff on hand to seal the ends when we crosscut the large limbs and upper trunk area so it doesn't check too much.

I won't know how much usable wood there is until we drop it. It's possible there is a lot of soft wood. The tree is old and has been afflicted for the last 3 years or so.

There is a guy near here with a portable saw mill. I will see if I can reach him and find out the cost to cut some of it up. I don't really have any room to sticker and stack it so I need to think about where I may be able to store some of it.

I would like to cut into the largest part of the limb that has fallen and see how it looks.

I will have to check on latex paint prices for sealing.


Chuck
 
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