A Journey in Time...

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Gotcha6

Dennis
Staff member
Corporate Member
Lest anyone thing I've been a little slack in my WWing endeavors this year, let me show you some of what I've been working on. This is a custom Wine Cellar for a customer of ours that we've been working on since March. In addition to the supervisory aspect of all this, I've done all the on site carpentry. With there being 12 steps into this cellar, yo can see why I nicknamed this project "The 12 Step Program". This is pretty photo heavy so if you're on dial up, be patient:

First, there's the entry doors. We took the original cellar doors and clad them with hammered copper and applied steel strap hinges and pulls:


"But wait!" you say, "Won't that make them too heavy to open?" Yes, it will, so we installed automatic gate openers and gas shocks to give them a boost. We also modified some old doors to make an entry into the cellar itself, although they don't show up very well here:


Then we put faux stone veneer and stone treads and risers on the steps and had to cut out and brace the floor rim band to get head clearance. The ceiling here is lowered to allow HVAC ducting to cross over above:



At the foot of the stairs we needed a place for the empties. It also doubles as a concealed door to the HVAC service area:


On the wall opposite we installed an old leaded glass window:



Once inside, I built a wine rack to fit the space. It had to be designed so as to be brought down in segments and assembled in the cellar with minimal head clearance after receiving a distressing and antiquing finish by others. The ceiling was made of rough sawn oak from Virginia. The T & G sections were made in removable panels for access to piping and equipment above. All finishes had to be water based to avoid possible hydrocarbon contamination of the wine:



The angle cabinet got a set of drawers instead of the sloped display rack. But we also added a full extension slide out counter below. Lighting is accomplished by a low voltage track mounted to the wall above the cabinet with arms extending out as much as 24":




Then on the opposite side we built a counter with arched stone top and sides back lit the shelves with LED ribbon lights (on a dimmer, of course). The top was milled and glued on site and then stained in place. The piece above the top is an antique relief transom that was fitted with a wine glass rack and mounted into the stone work. To the right is a copper vessel and basin mounted onto the wall:


The original wine rack they wanted to use was an antique that was disassembled and placed into the basement after the floor was installed and prior to the stone installation:


The entire space is insulated and climate controlled for temp and humidity. I may add some other pics later on, but this has been a challenging and enjoyable project for a couple of great customers for me. Although they weren't sure sometimes what they wanted, we were able to work through any issues and ultimately create the space they were looking for.
Thanks for looking.
 

MarkE

Mark
Corporate Member
Beautiful job! Some real craftsmanship in there, blending the old with the new.
 
T

toolferone

Wow, that is a awesome cellar! And a lot of work. Very nicely done!
 

Glennbear

Moderator
Glenn
Very nicely done Dennis :icon_thum Given the complexity of the project and obvious expense I would hazard a guess that the cutomer is not employed as a Wal-Mart greeter. :gar-La;
 

bobby g

Bob
Corporate Member
Very nice work Dennis. Great theme and implementation! How does the handrail move in and out of position?

bobby g
 

sawman101

Bruce Swanson
Corporate Member
Great work Dennis! If I had a wine cellar, I would also need a waste basket to throw the screw caps in.:gar-Bi
 

JackLeg

Reggie
Corporate Member
Dennis, that is a beautiful job!! :eusa_clap I can see why it took so long, but, you satisfied the client and that's the main thing. Merry Christmas!! :wsmile:
 

Gotcha6

Dennis
Staff member
Corporate Member
Very nice work Dennis. Great theme and implementation! How does the handrail move in and out of position?

bobby g

Handrail is welded to the underside of the door leaf so it folds down with the door as it closes.
 
M

McRabbet

Superb job! Having built one myself back in 2007, I know the long hours involved! The fact that this one is in a stone cellar makes it all that much ore special. I love the kegs in the walls and the antique copper fixtures, too.

One minor comment that I did in mine was to make a shelf that extended out from each ten-bottle vertical section at the fourth set of cleats so a bottle from the case in that section could be placed on the shelf (it had a routed depression) and a second bottle could stand on the counter below that. That way, a full case could fit in one section. Here's a picture (and no, it is not bowed at the top; that's an artifact from the wide angle lens):

100_3080.JPG

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T

toolferone

Handrail is welded to the underside of the door leaf so it folds down with the door as it closes.

It took me a 2nd and 3rd look to see that the handrail is in 2 pieces. One attached to the door and the other attached to the stone wall. The picture makes it look like the handrail is one single long piece. Am I right?
 

Gotcha6

Dennis
Staff member
Corporate Member
It is two pieces. Upper is welded to the door and is positioned to be aligned with the lower rail that is attached to the stone when opened.
 
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