A good Brush matters for finishing

danmart77

Dan
Corporate Member
In my haste to encourage others to consider different colored flakes of shellac, I forgot to mention how I put my finish on large and small pieces. I still have a brush that I used 30 years ago but lately I've been loosing hair in the finish.

For applying varnish I have a couple brushes and for shellac I have several. When all is said and done I love this new brush I found on a violin building site that is available without getting too pricey. The brush I use now is offered by the Jack Richeson company. As you can see on the handle it is made in Italy. I think they know a little about finishing.

184972


The brush above is the 1 3/8 round brush offered at Amazon for around 12-13 dollars.

184973

The pointed sash brush is a must for oil and shellac under certain applications. I use this to get in small details but with shellac you need to load the brush and NOT run out on the sweep.

I have used the brush above for a year now and I must confess it is my go to brush for all shellac applications. No cleaning just put the brush in a small baggy to keep dust off of it.

The sash brush must be cleaned after varnish work but it too is wonderful.

Why get one of these? Unlike the foam brush this can be used again and again and not fill the landfill. The other important factor is how much finish the round brush can hold without dripping. Its unique. Until you try one you'll just have to take my word.. I guess.

Give it a try.
 

nn4jw

Jim
Corporate Member
I only saw one review on Amazon for the top domed brush. It wasn't good and said the brush shed bristles badly. That's not what you've experienced though? Spotty QA maybe?
 

Rwe2156

DrBob
Senior User
Not familiar with those but I'll definitely check them out.

But you are correct about one thing: do not scrimp on brushes.

And remembering to clean & store them correctly. A good brush will last a long time.
 

danmart77

Dan
Corporate Member
I only saw one review on Amazon for the top domed brush. It wasn't good and said the brush shed bristles badly. That's not what you've experienced though? Spotty QA maybe?
I have not found a brush that will not have a hair fall out. With shellac this is meaningless really. You can pluck it off the surface, dip the brush in some alcohol and pull the surrounding area with one pass.

I've only used the brush a dozen times and I am just very impressed with the performance. The cost is 1/3 of what I have paid 10 years ago for a good hog hair brush.

Take a look at a typical natural bristle list. They just are not cheap.

https://www.jerrysartarama.com/global-arts-escoda-natural-chungking-bristle-brushes?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIjPfe6_fI4QIVjK_ICh18YQY6EAQYAyABEgIHRfD_BwE
 

nn4jw

Jim
Corporate Member
I have not found a brush that will not have a hair fall out. With shellac this is meaningless really. You can pluck it off the surface, dip the brush in some alcohol and pull the surrounding area with one pass.

I've only used the brush a dozen times and I am just very impressed with the performance. The cost is 1/3 of what I have paid 10 years ago for a good hog hair brush.

Take a look at a typical natural bristle list. They just are not cheap.

https://www.jerrysartarama.com/global-arts-escoda-natural-chungking-bristle-brushes?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIjPfe6_fI4QIVjK_ICh18YQY6EAQYAyABEgIHRfD_BwE
I've never had a brush at any price point that didn't drop at least the occasional hair either. In any case I did order those brushes the same day even after the One (1) review to try out.
 

danmart77

Dan
Corporate Member
Jim
The most important thing to jump out at you will be the amount of shellac the brush can hold and not make a mess. As many others here and elsewhere point out, you just can not go back very easily when you brush gets dry. Once you see how much the brush will hold based to some degree on how thick or thin you cut your shellac .. you're in the tall rows.

After your comment about hair loss while working I went back and that seems to be a routine comment in the chalk paint world. I am not familiar with this medium but it sounds very different than working with shellac.

Another user posted that he leaves his brush in the solvent(alcohol) when the brush is not in use. I can see that as somewhat useful but I thin my shellac quite a bit more than most others having first learned to use Seedlac thinned way down and then thickened up after a few coats.

At the time, we were in a museum setting and the use of boiled linseed as a base was required to replicate the original process.

Later
 

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