Some of you may know the long story behind the "Chest of many drawers"

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
Interesting.

if the pieces are joined it will no longer be modular and will then have the same transportation problem as the previous design.

I was hoping for something that can be easily disassembled and loaded in a compact car.
 

Phil S

Board of Directors, President
Phil Soper
Staff member
Corporate Member
Interesting.

if the pieces are joined it will no longer be modular and will then have the same transportation problem as the previous design.

I was hoping for something that can be easily disassembled and loaded in a compact car.
Possible to dissemble if the connectors are removable. I will work on a better method - quite sure one of our mechanical designers can come up with better method to connect
 

Hmerkle

Hank
Corporate Member
but if we come up with some kind of "hardware" (thinking of a wooden wedge system) that holds the boxes together that would work...
Also, one could put three "triangles" together and then that would be modularized...
 

Hmerkle

Hank
Corporate Member
what about a "Barrister bookcase style" with drawers, then it is easily transported...
Then you could incorporate Phil's triangle design along with square drawers...
 

creasman

Jim
Corporate Member
What if each triangle were a separate unit? These could be stacked in different configurations, perhaps one unit, individually or multiple units, to build whatever configuration you wanted. They could be locked together using rare earth magnets.

The main build would be to make the triangle shells. These would need to be very exact, each equilateral and the same size. They should have a back and the magnets pre-installed. Once the stackable shells are made, then hand one out to each woodworker to make drawer/door/infill. Bring them back together and let the buyer assemble to their liking.

Thoughts?
 

Phil S

Board of Directors, President
Phil Soper
Staff member
Corporate Member
What if each triangle were a separate unit? These could be stacked in different configurations, perhaps one unit, individually or multiple units, to build whatever configuration you wanted. They could be locked together using rare earth magnets.

The main build would be to make the triangle shells. These would need to be very exact, each equilateral and the same size. They should have a back and the magnets pre-installed. Once the stackable shells are made, then hand one out to each woodworker to make drawer/door/infill. Bring them back together and let the buyer assemble to their liking.

Thoughts?
Indeed I did mean for each triangle box to be separate - connectivity allows them to be arranged in multiple configurations - think Legos. I like the idea of magnets, but I am struggling how they would work in some configurations where you only have point to point contact as in the open configuration I used as an example.
 

Hmerkle

Hank
Corporate Member
Indeed I did mean for each triangle box to be separate - connectivity allows them to be arranged in multiple configurations - think Legos. I like the idea of magnets, but I am struggling how they would work in some configurations where you only have point to point contact as in the open configuration I used as an example.
Going off Jim's idea, what if you made a "four triangle-triangle" (you may need a few singles) but you could put the magnets on the faces and configure in multiple ways! The base would need to be ~40" wide (ene more upside down triangle) rather than 35", but...

another idea: the "open" spaces could actually be "Box" that would connect the the other three boxes of the 4-piece triangle...

This design would be so great in a child's room! (what fun!)

1613850215254.png
 

Phil S

Board of Directors, President
Phil Soper
Staff member
Corporate Member
Going off Jim's idea, what if you made a "four triangle-triangle" (you may need a few singles) but you could put the magnets on the faces and configure in multiple ways! The base would need to be ~40" wide (ene more upside down triangle) rather than 35", but...

another idea: the "open" spaces could actually be "Box" that would connect the the other three boxes of the 4-piece triangle...

This design would be so great in a child's room! (what fun!)

View attachment 199988
You could put drawers - point down in the open spaces without making another box. If the boxes were 5/8 thick and you had a 1/4 overlay then you would have 1/8 spacing between all drawers. A segmented front from Charlie could go upside down - who would know
Yes it would look great in a kids room. Leave the top few off and put a small top on it
A six inch style with maybe six or eight inch depth could also be good in a kitchen
Or even screw storage in a fancy workshop
 

creasman

Jim
Corporate Member
I like the idea of magnets, but I am struggling how they would work in some configurations where you only have point to point contact as in the open configuration I used as an example.
I was thinking that even the open spaces would consist of a triangle shell. All triangles would be the same. Just half would have drawers/doors and the other half would only have backs (or maybe no back). It makes sense to leave the inverted triangles (point down) open. A drawer might not slide as well in one of these spaces.

Regarding the magnets, each rectangular side of the triangular prism would have four magnets near the corners. The polarity would be opposite on the sides for open vs drawer space. [Pretty sure that would work, but I'm still on my first cup of coffee... need another cup or so to convince myself.] This way any open space could attach to any drawer space regardless how you orient the triangle.

In terms of a picture the magnets polarity would be opposite. From the side perspective, below.

1613910921005.png


Or, in terms of how the front view would look straight on.

1613911289710.png


Magnets might get expensive. It would take 12 per triangle. A quick search shows the 3/4" ones at about $15 for 20.
 

Phil S

Board of Directors, President
Phil Soper
Staff member
Corporate Member
The more I think about magnets I get less sold on them. Magnets snap together pretty hard, I see pinched fingers as one tried to align the edges when stacking them. Additionally they would show on the exposed sides, plus I am thinking they would eliminate the possibility of reversing some drawers if you wanted to. And would the magnets affect some items being stored in the drawer, i.e.; flash drives. What is option B or C ??
 

JohnnyR

John
Corporate Member
I think we have to be more specific as to the use/user. If for children it would have to be on the floor with either a small base or a short chest under it and the 'doors' more suitable for a child but enough of a keep sake so it won't be discarded as he/she ages. If for a politician I could only see it in some permanent space such as the governor's mansion and this would need prior approval. For a home it would be pretty large to find a spot for it. It's too tall for a kitchen counter. I could see it as a wine rack with a chest of drawers under it and if placed in a kitchen (few would have the space) using the drawers for spices etc. May be best in some historical/art building or in a NC welcome center along the highway. I think we should focus on giving away whatever we make rather than selling it as a main purpose is to recognize NCWW and its artists/crafters.
 

creasman

Jim
Corporate Member
I see your points. Those rare earth magnets can be quite strong. Perhaps try an experiment with different strengths of magnets to see how much force they exert. Unless you dedicate some triangles as being for the ends only you probably have some part of the locking mechanism exposed.

The sliding, butterfly dovetails that you show in the original diagram are one type of locking joint. However, I can't quite see how these work if you want the piece to have multiple configurations.

Another locking joint would be to use a key hole on one face and the matching key on the other. You lock the sides together by putting the head of the key into the hole and then slide the unit back an inch until the faces are flush, locking them in place. The key heads would need to protrude above the surface, requiring certain triangles to be for the base and sides as these faces should not have keys or holes.

Another option would be to use the types of fasteners found in IKEA furniture. They're similar to the key hole, where you insert a pin (the key) and then lock this in place by tightening a cam that locks around the head of the key. "Some assembly required" with this approach.

Interested in seeing what ideas others have for attaching.
 

Hmerkle

Hank
Corporate Member
I woldn't be so quick to give up on the magnets - by installing them deeper, you could get varying strengths, and perhaps the key-hole or fastener idea in combination might be a better solution -- I like the key-hole idea, but It might limit configuration... not sure...

I keep going back to the barrister bookcase idea with this structure inside the modular case... but guessing from the crickets, that is not popular.

A little shocked we have only a few people commenting...
 

bowman

Board of Directors, Events Director
Neal
Staff member
Corporate Member
I'm trying to wrap my brain around the project :)eek:). The triangle design is interesting.
 

Phil S

Board of Directors, President
Phil Soper
Staff member
Corporate Member
Another thought, completely off the wall - no actually on the wall
Wall hanging probably 4 wide by 3 high No case work Reasonably light Easy to donate
I could see one hanging on the wall of a children's hospital waiting room. 9 or 10 committed members seems doable

It is an Irish Love symbol
love symbol.jpg
 

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