Sample Stools?

Status
Not open for further replies.

Dave Richards

Dave
Senior User


The originals of these are all dated to around 1950. The one front right is American. The rest are French. I think these designs would still work fine today and none would be terribly difficult to make.
 

thsb

Tim
Senior User
I like these.
i wonder how the tops of these get attached. everything i have built has had an apron so can hide what i am using to attach the top. that wouldn't be possible with these. are the stool tops small enough that one would screw the legs directly to it?
 

Dave Richards

Dave
Senior User
On the tall one, the seat would be attached with screws up through the top rails. Holes in the top rails would be counterbored. The seat on the front left stool is left loose. Seats on the other two round stools are joined to the legs with mortise and tenon joints.

The legs on the front right stool are also joined with mortise and tenon joints. In the image above it almost looks like a three-legged stool but it isn't.
 

CrealBilly

New User
Jeff
On the tall one, the seat would be attached with screws up through the top rails. Holes in the top rails would be counterbored. The seat on the front left stool is left loose. Seats on the other two round stools are joined to the legs with mortise and tenon joints.

The legs on the front right stool are also joined with mortise and tenon joints. In the image above it almost looks like a three-legged stool but it isn't.
I like the design... I'm used to seeing bracing on the legs to prevent them from collapsing under a load or working loose overtime. How do these work - could you please explain the mechanics behind the legs?
 

Dave Richards

Dave
Senior User
I like the design... I'm used to seeing bracing on the legs to prevent them from collapsing under a load or working loose overtime. How do these work - could you please explain the mechanics behind the legs?
Evidently they work well. At least the originals which are 60 years old or more are still around. As I understand it, the legs have tenons on the tops that fit into mortises on the underside of the second slat in from the outside. I doubt they would be suitable in a house of rugrats and ruffians but they'd be fine where people would take care of the furniture.

This piece by Josef Hoffmann and made around 1906 is still around and doing fine. It looks even less sturdy. I think most furniture is probably over-engineered.

 

CrealBilly

New User
Jeff
Evidently they work well. At least the originals which are 60 years old or more are still around. As I understand it, the legs have tenons on the tops that fit into mortises on the underside of the second slat in from the outside. I doubt they would be suitable in a house of rugrats and ruffians but they'd be fine where people would take care of the furniture.

This piece by Josef Hoffmann and made around 1906 is still around and doing fine. It looks even less sturdy. I think most furniture is probably over-engineered.

No way something like that would survive in the Crealbilly household very long - unless it were a decorative piece. I have 5 grandkids that we love having over all the time, pile on Pa Pa is the name of the game some times. Besides we are not little people - my sons and daughters are 6' plus. I guess I passed on the tall gene. Except for my adopted daughters who are 4' 10 and 5' and my adopted sons who are 5' 2 and 5' 4 respectively.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Our Sponsors

LATEST FOR SALE LISTINGS

Top