Oliver 299D magnetic starter issue?

Howie

Howie
Senior User
If it blows up, keep your opinions on my advice to yourself :)
So mad at myself at the point I may just stick my head real close when I throw the switch. A lot of hours waisted but learning alot also.
Thanks again
 

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bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
The time will only be wasted if you make the same mistakes twice.
Those old mag starters can be exasperating at first. Been down that road a lot.
 

Oka

Board of Directors, Vice President
Casey
Staff member
Corporate Member
I agree with Bob. Likely the coil on it is incompatible with the lower voltage.

It sounds to me like the coil is rated for the higher voltage and a coil change is in order.
 

bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
The 299 literature I read states that the planer comes equipped with low voltage control magnetic starter so that 40 volt coil makes perfect sense.
 

Howie

Howie
Senior User
Looks like I'm out of luck Mr. Bob, it's steep down 480 to 240. I 've read you can reverse em but seems like given it's age don't want to chance it. So a new starter in the offing.

Thanks again
 

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bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
Old electrical stuff is such a pain! Things previous owners did are often a mystery.
I assume that the motors are dual voltage 220/440 and are currently connected to run on 220 three phase.
 

Howie

Howie
Senior User
The motors are 220/440 and were configured 440v. I changed them to 240v because thats what I'm now producing. There is a chance I can change just he coil should know the answer tonight either way I have to make a decision...tic tok aaannnnd I just discovered I mounted the thermal upside down when I reassembled, fun fun!!
 

bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
I see no reason why putting a 220 volt coil in won't work.
Lots of things can still be an annoyance in the electrical system. Every now and then one of the contacts gets a little too corroded and won't make full contact. This condition starves the motors.

Renewing the contacts isn't hard. Push them down and twist them out. There's a spring in there so be careful it doesn't fly into never never land.

I'll usually rub the contact's surface on 320 grit to knock off the rocks, then go to 400 and or 500 to get a good polish. A file isn't your friend.

That extra set of contacts on the right can be used for the full voltage legs. Chances are that set of contacts are the interlock for the little coil so they have never carried full voltage current.


1       contacts.jpg
 

bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
I'll go worst case scenario on those contact points. Lets say a set is so badly pitted that it isn't worth fixing. Option 1: buy new contact sets on eBay once you figure which stock number they are. Option 2: fix it yourself. Those points are generally silver soldered on so with a propane torch, take off the old ones and put on new ones. I've done that many times. I'll just find a mag starter with points about the same size and de-solder them and solder them on the strip. Its a pain to do, but when the machine is a good one, well worth the effort.

Below is a set of contacts from a drum switch on my metal lathe. Before and after silver solder. I later found the stock number of the contacts and could have ordered them. Maybe next time I will but this starter has been in use since the late 1960s so I'm not too worried about it.

1        drumcontacts - 1.jpg 1        drumcontacts - 2.jpg
 

Howie

Howie
Senior User
I see no reason why putting a 220 volt coil in won't work.
Lots of things can still be an annoyance in the electrical system. Every now and then one of the contacts gets a little too corroded and won't make full contact. This condition starves the motors.

Renewing the contacts isn't hard. Push them down and twist them out. There's a spring in there so be careful it doesn't fly into never never land.

I'll usually rub the contact's surface on 320 grit to knock off the rocks, then go to 400 and or 500 to get a good polish. A file isn't your friend.

That extra set of contacts on the right can be used for the full voltage legs. Chances are that set of contacts are the interlock for the little coil so they have never carried full voltage current.


View attachment 214564
Cleaned up sprung contacts and their oppisites before I reassembled. Just orderd this one, what do you think? >NEW CUTLER-HAMMER 9-1010-2 COIL 208/220 V 2nd pic. my original.
1667346982202.png
 

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bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
Looks close enough to me. I don't have a stock number list of coils for that starter. I know its covered by bulletin 9586 but that series number covers a lot of sizes.
 

Howie

Howie
Senior User
Looks close enough to me. I don't have a stock number list of coils for that starter. I know its covered by bulletin 9586 but that series number covers a lot of sizes.
Cleaned up sprung contacts and their oppisites before I reassembled. Just orderd this one, what do you think? >NEW CUTLER-HAMMER 9-1010-2 COIL 208/220 V 2nd pic. my original.
View attachment 214570
Ordred a 2nd one, both can be returned if not suitable. TY for your help.
 

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Howie

Howie
Senior User
I had a Moak table saw once that had a dual voltage motor and when I bought it, it was set up for 440. I too had it set up via a phase converter and a buddy of mine advised that I had purchase and install new heaters in the starter for it to work correctly. I followed his advice and it ran flawlessly.

Unfortunately it's been quite some time since I did that and no longer have that saw. It seems I had to cross reference the heater make/model to know what to purchase to run it on the 3ph 220 but I don't remember exactly how I did it.

Fortunately for us, we have Bob Vaughn who regularly visits this site and I feel certain that he can advise you of the process. More good news is that I remember the heaters being inexpensive as I purchased them off of eBay.

Good Luck with your project!

Jim
Hey Jim, I have a couple of 220 60 cy coild on the way to try. When you say heaters you mean whats in the picture correct?

TY
 

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bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
Not Jim, but you are correct those are called heaters.
Current passes through them. If the current is too much they get hot causing an internal bimetallic strip to move out of position so a spring loaded catch uncoils and disconnect the circuit. (or something like that)
Heaters with lower rating have thinner wire, heaters with a higher amp rating have thicker wire.
 

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