How to bevel the edge of a circle?

Berta

Berta
Corporate Member
I have successfully cut circles with a router and circle cutting jig. The hole doesn’t have to go clear through, just make it the bottom. I would make the bevel on the router table with a guide pin.
 

JohnnyR

John
Corporate Member
Another thing to think about - that acute angle will be very prone to chip out or splinters in use. It will also be tough to hold up any kind of 'film' finish. I would suggest that you either round it over or a small vertical cut-off of the angle, and account for the waste in your dimensions.
 

Yelverton

Mitch
Corporate Member
Another thing to think about - that acute angle will be very prone to chip out or splinters in use. It will also be tough to hold up any kind of 'film' finish. I would suggest that you either round it over or a small vertical cut-off of the angle, and account for the waste in your dimensions.
Yep, my plan is to have a small vertical band on the top edge with the chamfer below.
 

Steve_Honeycutt

Chat Administartor
Steve
Corporate Member
Unless you want to buy a router bit, I would use the router pin concept on the table saw. You could clamp two boards in a “V” shape on the table saw. With some careful measuring and test cuts, you could have this finished quickly.
 

Skymaster

Jack
Senior User
ELECTRONS ARE OUR ENEMY, THEY MUST BE ELIMINATED WITH ALL DUE PREJUDICE !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

TENdriver

TENdriver
User
Mitch,

I used to think a router, a pattern bit and a template were a great solution. Then I moved on to hand tools!

Instead of creating a one size template, I think a safer and more practical solution is a V-notched fence that can be used to safely route a variety of circle sizes.

You are going to be routing end grain, and the notched fence is an easier and safer way to do that work.

I’ve seen multiple (and some very dramatic) fails when a router bit catches in end grain.



image.jpg
 

mkepke

Mark
Senior User
A lot of ways to skin this particular cat.

Another is to power sand a blank into a circle and then sand in the chamfer. Basically what Berta described using a circle cutting jig with a pin, but replace the router with a power sander of some type. It's easily done using a disc sander, but could be done with e.g. a belt sander if that's what one has.

-Mark
 

Yelverton

Mitch
Corporate Member
Just a quick update on this project - I ended up making a table saw circle jig and a router circle jig. I used the former to cut out the circle, including the chamfer, in one step. I used the latter to route a ring-shaped groove in the bottom of the piece of the bearing to sit in. Nice to have both on hand as I designed them in a way that will let me cut a wide range of circle sizes with the same jigs. Thanks to all for your input.
 

Attachments

Yelverton

Mitch
Corporate Member
Nice figure in that wood!
Thanks - I could have spent time finding some material that was more uniform, but I decided that I like the contrast. A little bit of figure adds just enough interest without it being too perfect to worry about actually using it.
 

junquecol

Bruce
User
Just a quick update on this project - I ended up making a table saw circle jig and a router circle jig. I used the former to cut out the circle, including the chamfer, in one step. I used the latter to route a ring-shaped groove in the bottom of the piece of the bearing to sit in. Nice to have both on hand as I designed them in a way that will let me cut a wide range of circle sizes with the same jigs. Thanks to all for your input.
Hopefully we will be seeing pictures of the jigs also.
 

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