Dust Collector Wiring

frankc4113

Frank C
Corporate Member
I'm looking to wire a 120V dust collector to a 220V table saw using a relay so that when I turn the saw on the dust collector starts up. Some time ago a friend of mine who was an electrical engineer did that for me on another saw that was 220V. I just don't remember the way to get it done. If there is anyone that knows how to wire the 120V dust collector in to the 220V saw I would appreciate it.
 

JimD

Jim
Senior User
If you can find a relay with a 220V trigger circuit that can control your 120V DC (amperage) it would work. I did a really quick google search and didn't see one. But I did not try very hard. You would wire the relay trigger circuit in parallel with the motor (the current draw is tiny) and then let the relay switch the hot wire for the DC. You could fit the relay into an electrical box with a plug for the DC.
 

JimD

Jim
Senior User
What Charlie said will work as long as the table saw switch can handle the current (amps) for both the table saw and the DC. I would be concerned unless I knew it was capable of it. But Charlie is right that 220 is just line to line with either of the lines providing 120 to neutral.
 

frankc4113

Frank C
Corporate Member
Thanks so much for the replies.
I just called Ivac Switch in Canada at 8PM expecting that the place would be closed but never the less, I thought I would try. A man by the name of Dave answered the phone from his home and was most helpful. I ordered 2 parts that when connected will turn the dust collector on when the saw starts and keep it on for whatever time you set it for after shutting the saw off. The total was $138 which included shipping.
For anyone who may want to use the Ivac system I will list the 2 pieces. You can buy them through other Ivac dealers but Dave was so helpful I would advise to order them directly from Ivac.
Parts are: 1. Pro Tool Plus #TP-NA
2. Ivac Pro Switch #S11520-A-NA
 

junquecol

Bruce
User
You don't need a relay. Connect the 120V power wire (black) to one of the 120V output connections on the 220V switch. Connect the 110V ground wire (white) to ground.
Be certain that the 220 switch can handle the total amps.
NEC doesn't allow for using gound as a neutral anymore, even though there are still millions of dryers and stoves that do such.
 

Alan in Little Washington

Alan Schaffter
Corporate Member
The simplest way to do it is with a relay (contactor) that has a coil rated at 220v and contacts rated for the voltage and amperage of the DC. You can typically find them on Ebay and surplus websites for under $10.

For "delay on off" you can add a delay on off relay. But, delay on off is not needed unless your DC has a cyclone and is far away from the source of dust. At typical DC air speeds of 4000 fpm (67 fps), it takes no time at all* for the lingering dust to reach the DC- less time that it will take you to clear the stock and off-cut and turn the saw off!! There is no need for it at all with bag systems, just ones with cyclones.

* less than .2 sec to go 10'
 

Alan in Little Washington

Alan Schaffter
Corporate Member
I have been using the same long ranger remote for over 15 years. Just clip it to your belt and you can control your dust collector everywhere that you go. Long Ranger III Remote 110V Starter | Klingspor's Woodworking Shop
But you can't operate your blast gate that way, and frankly to me that is just as important or more so if you let your DC run continuously. Unless your DC makes objectionable noise, you can leave it going. You'll want the highest CFM the DC will generate at the machine currently being used. If you have multiple machines and blast gates, you'll need to close all the others and will constantly be opening and closing blast gates as you move from machine to machine. I often go back and forth between tablesaw and jointer when I'm preparing a lot of stock.

Another option for the relay solution I mentioned above is to get a relay with a low voltage coil and contacts rated for your DC (e.g. 12 V / 120V). Then use a small 12V transformer with a 220V primary that runs off the saw to power the relay. That would only cost a few bucks more.

The problem with my earlier and this solution is that operating the saw for multiple short periods may exceed the DC motor's duty cycle and cause it to overheat. Remember, starting a DC w/o a blast gate puts the mosts strain (highest current draw) on the motor. That is one reason I designed my autogate system so it wouldn't turn the DC off.
 

Pop Golden

Pop
Corporate Member
I'm with Brad. Just setting up my system, but my blast gates are at the machines so it's not too far to open & close when needed. I too am a proud owner of a Long Ranger. I set up my 1st. shop with a RAS & a Shopsmith. When you use a Shopsmith you quickly learn & develop the habit of sawing or whatever all possible parts before resetting the machine for another operation. This would mean you do all sawing possible before going to the jointer. To keep things simple leave both gates open. Your DC should be able to handle the 2 machine draw.

Pop
 

DavidK

David
Corporate Member
The problem with my earlier and this solution is that operating the saw for multiple short periods may exceed the DC motor's duty cycle and cause it to overheat. Remember, starting a DC w/o a blast gate puts the mosts strain (highest current draw) on the motor. That is one reason I designed my autogate system so it wouldn't turn the DC off.
Starting and stopping a DC motor will cause it to overheat, but counter-intuitively the most strain on the motor is with no restriction (all gates open). When there is no/minimal air flow, it does not take much energy.
 

Alan in Little Washington

Alan Schaffter
Corporate Member
Starting and stopping a DC motor will cause it to overheat, but counter-intuitively the most strain on the motor is with no restriction (all gates open). When there is no/minimal air flow, it does not take much energy.
It is a function of time. Not just all gates open but little to no ductwork- that will cause the breaker to pop in a heartbeat.
 

Our Sponsors

LATEST FOR SALE LISTINGS

Top