Digital Woodworking

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timf67

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Tim
I wanted to share my first "fully digital" woodworking project. I was a little worried that going digital would be somehow less satisfying, but I am finding that going digital lets you be more creative in the design aspect and it takes some of the stress out of the part cutting process. This project is a gift for my Father's 75th birthday (he is the one who infected me with the woodworking bug) and each of his children, children-in-law and grandchildren will write him letters to put in the box. It is a keyed miter lidded box (no hinge) that measures about 7.5"x10.5"x4.5". I used a piece of 3/8" thick quarter-sawn cherry for the sides and used my CNC machine to miter fold the sides for a truly continuous grain all the way around. The glue-up was simple due to the perfect miters and there were no gaps. I used a wavy grained piece of flat sawn cherry for the lid and engraved a quote in the lid. While cutting parts out of 3/4" baltic birch for a different project, I cut parts for the keyed miter sled out of the waste areas. The miter sled assembled with just 1/4-20 bolts due to the quarter inch alignment holes in each piece. I then cut the keys out of some 1/8" walnut using the CNC machine. Then I sanded to 320 grit and put a coat of Tung oil on it. I will likely rub in a few coats of amber shellac once it is dry. Feel free to ask any questions!

TimIMG_4665.jpgIMG_4679.jpgIMG_4678.jpgIMG_4676.jpgIMG_4675.jpgIMG_4674.jpgIMG_4673.jpgIMG_4672.jpgIMG_4671.jpgIMG_4642.jpgIMG_4661.jpg
 

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Bruce
Corporate Member
DQ
Oh darn! I didn't think that I needed to go digital.
Verrrrry nicely done. An heirloom for sure.
 

timf67

Member
Tim
I recognize Kent's dust shoe .. but who is the manufacturer of your CNC?
Technically, I am the manufacturer. It is called the Platform CNC. It is a kit with the structural parts supplied by Grunblau Design and the motion control parts (drives and controllers) provided by CNC router parts. I then modified the base design by adding Hiwin rails on all axes.
 

timf67

Member
Tim
Nice, what bit did you use for the miter sides? And what software?
I used a standard 90 degree vee bit and a V-carve toolpath in Vectric V-carve Pro to do the miters. Just make the vector be twice as wide as your material is thick and set the flat depth at material thickness. Also make sure you carry the vector far enough past the edges of your piece to make the miter go the full width.
 

riggsp

Phil
Corporate Member
DQ
Very neat...I find that my CNC has changed my woodworking considerably...I’m going to have to try that miter fold...I use Vectric Aspire and I’m really pleased with how easy it is to use.
 

kserdar

Ken
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I used a standard 90 degree vee bit and a V-carve toolpath in Vectric V-carve Pro to do the miters. Just make the vector be twice as wide as your material is thick and set the flat depth at material thickness. Also make sure you carry the vector far enough past the edges of your piece to make the miter go the full width.
Wouldn't it be easier to just make one vector line (at the corner). Tell V-carve to cut "on" the vector for the depth (width) of the board?

Since, I too, use Aspire ... maybe cutting "on" the line is not available in V-Carve?
 

timf67

Member
Tim
Wouldn't it be easier to just make one vector line (at the corner). Tell V-carve to cut "on" the vector for the depth (width) of the board?

Since, I too, use Aspire ... maybe cutting "on" the line is not available in V-Carve?
Good point. In theory you are right, but a couple of things to consider. First, V-Carve Pro doesn't have a cut on vector option for the V-carve tool path. Second, even if it did, I prefer the tool path that I can create which takes smaller "bites" and allows me to be able to cut a groove that is wider than my v-bit. Workholding is always an issue for me (and many CNC'ers), so small bites = small cutting forces and an easier time holding the work piece in one place.
 

kserdar

Ken
User
Good point. In theory you are right, but a couple of things to consider. First, V-Carve Pro doesn't have a cut on vector option for the V-carve tool path. Second, even if it did, I prefer the tool path that I can create which takes smaller "bites" and allows me to be able to cut a groove that is wider than my v-bit. Workholding is always an issue for me (and many CNC'ers), so small bites = small cutting forces and an easier time holding the work piece in one place.
Aspire allows "depth of cut" ... so you can make many small bites. Basic rule is 1/2 * bit diameter = depth of cut.
Also, can control direction of cut. Biggest drawback for single vector is one side gets climb cut. But, there are other features in Aspire to fix that.
 

kg5000

New Member
Kenny
Great project! The dark joinery pieces provide nice contrast. I really like the quotation on top.
 
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