New SawStop - advice needed on fence and outfeed table

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BrianBDH

New User
Brian
Sawstop.jpg

Santa has come early to my house. Been wanting one of these for a very long time, but couldn't pull the trigger. Couple of months ago, I reluctantly gave my 17 yr old the okay to use my old TS for some of his projects. I came home from work one day and he was cutting some plywood with nobody around. Even though I have taught him TS safety, and he wasn't doing anything unsafe, the hair on the back of my neck still stood up. So made the decision to buy the SawStop. The wife helped a lot by letting Santa pay for half.

So today I did the initial saw assembly. Took my time, enjoyed the work. Now I need some advice from SawStop and from other contractor saw users.

1. SawStop users - I bought the base 1.75 HP model with the 30" contractor fence. I would like to know what opinions are on this fence. It looks kind of light and flimsy to me. I thought about upgrading the T-glide fence, but another $200 seemed high. I have a Delta T2 fence that I think I am going to mount on this saw. Then I can include the SawStop contractor fence with my old saw when I sell it.

2. Contractor Saw users - My previous saw was a direct drive. I mounted an outfeed table to the rear fence angle via some hinges that allowed it to swing down. This let me roll the saw up against the wall of my garage for storage. I was hoping some of you could help with ideas of how to mount an outfeed table on the contractor saw (with the motor sticking out the back) which would also hinge down for storage. Any ideas of pictures would be very much appreciated.

Thanks everybody and Merry Christmas!

Brian
 

Mark Gottesman

New User
Mark
Delta T2 is a good fence. I would only replace it if you thought it was holding you back. Simple, rugged, holds settings and is easy to adjust.

Out feed table. I see two solutions to your question. A roll around outfeed table with locking casters, storage and a lip that extends over the motor. Or, Add a fixed table extension out the back that extends past the motor (with cutout for motor when doing angle cuts) and then a folding table attached to that. Hope that makes sense and have fun with the new saw.
 

tarheelz

New User
Dave
Congrats on the new toy!

As Mark says, see how their basic fence works for you for a while.

I have the T-Glide on my 36" PCS and I can say that I like it very very much. Unfortunately, I can't tell you whether I would have been just as happy with the basic fence. (I do know now that I could never live with the smaller fence as I need a space to hold my [pencil, DC remote, safety glasses, push stick].
 

JimD

Jim
Senior User
My solution to the need for outfeed support is to make my router table 1/4 inch lower than my table saw and move it into position when I need outfeed support. My old workbench was also the same height as the router table and served as outfeed support too (then the router table was infeed support). Since getting a tracksaw, I rarely need the outfeed support, however.
 

KenOfCary

Ken
Staff member
Corporate Member
I have a Vega Fence on my SawStop PCS. Already had the fence and ordered the saw without one. Saved a little money that way and the Vega fence is very nice. It has a micro-adjust feature that I actually use occasionally. Not often, but occasionally. They have great customer service as well. One of the knobs for the handle broke during assembly, I emailed them a picture of it and they sent a replacement overnight.

My assembly table is also the outfeed table for the saw. Complete with routed grooves to extend the range of the miter channels. (which collect a lot of sawdust btw.)
 

junquecol

Bruce
User
Consider making your out feed table detachable. Use two folding legs on rear, and a couple pins that drop into holes on rear rail on the front.
 

Rwe2156

DrBob
Senior User
For outfeed table, you can install a permanent 12" or so wide extension along the back of the top that projects just beyond the motor. Mount angled support braces anchored to the side or back of the machine. Then put a hinged extension off of that.

I made mine wide enough to accommodate the the runners of my crosscut sled when pushed past the blade. That way the extension table doesn't need slots in the top.

It doesn't have to hinged. You could make the extension table mobile and then it doubles as an assembly table when not needed.

I can post a pic of mine if it helps.
 

BrianBDH

New User
Brian
Thanks for the outfield table suggestions. I'm still thinking about what will work best. I should have said before that I can't use a separate table because I don't have room to store another table. Also, my garage floor or driveway where I do projects is not level. So the out feed table has to be supported by the saw body so it will maintain its relationship and position.

I have decided to move the Delta T2 fence to the new saw. All I have to do is drill a few new holes in the front angle support. Looking at the contractor fence, I just don't even want to waste my time mounting it. I would never be happy with it.

Now I have another question. After the recent rains I have already had to fight surface rust on the cast iron table. I put I light coat of bees wax/olive oil mixture on yesterday, but it didn't completely protect from the high humidity. What do you guys use to keep cast iron from rusting?

Thanks.

Brian
 

KenOfCary

Ken
Staff member
Corporate Member
The T9 products are pretty good for rust prevention and removal if you're meticulous about applying them. Keep sawdust off the cast iron - it collects moisture. I've used paste wax successfully - just make sure it doesn't have any silicone components. But if your saw is in an unconditioned space you will constantly have to battle humidity changes. The last few days in this area have been brutal on unconditioned spaces. Consider a dehumidifier or additional insulation if you're in an unconditioned garage.

Several of our members fight this problem this time of year, Salem (eyekode) comes to mind. He may have some tips for dealing with the problem.

Best advice I can give is keep a vigil and don't let the rust get ahead of you. As long as you deal with it as it happens, you won't get pitted surfaces, which are hard to deal with. A light coat of rust is easily removed. He said knowing easy is not always an operable word.
 

Mark Gottesman

New User
Mark
I use bowling alley wax. However, my workspace is under the house, stays at 50-60% humidity and 50-70 degrees year round. Things will rust, but it takes a long while. I never have seen machines "sweating".
 

Rwe2156

DrBob
Senior User
Thanks for the outfield table suggestions. I'm still thinking about what will work best. I should have said before that I can't use a separate table because I don't have room to store another table. Also, my garage floor or driveway where I do projects is not level. So the out feed table has to be supported by the saw body so it will maintain its relationship and position.
Then a hinges support table will work for you. There's couple YouTube videos out there regarding thiis.
keep in mind if you install the permanent extension and hinge off that, you won't need more than 30" or so to give you 48" beyond the blade.

if you can afford it, an aftermarket Biesmeyer type fence is nice. If money is no option, look at the Incra fences.

I have another question. After the recent rains I have already had to fight surface rust on the cast iron table. I put I light coat of bees wax/olive oil mixture on yesterday, but it didn't completely protect from the high humidity. What do you guys use to keep cast iron from rusting?

Thanks.

Brian
the more you use your table saw the less problems you will have with rust ;-). That being said, when its 40 and 40% humidity one night and 70 and 90% the next day, condensation happens. Cool equipment doesn't get along with muggy days. Blah blah blah....you already know that, so if you can insulate your garage or shop and close it up, that helps immensely.

I don't like wax I don't think it binds well enough to prevent rust. The only thing I use I'd the BoeShield spray coating.

When there is rust, I use good ole WD-40 and a scotchbrite pad or even an orbital sander. Once it's off, I clean with brake cleaner or denatured alcohol and apply BoeShield.

Before my shop was closed in, I found if I cut a piece of drop cloth or canvas to the size of the cast iron top and an equivalent piece of 3/4 plywood on top, that helped immensely. You can also try making a cover for your machine with a drawstring at the bottom and keep a tub of DampRid underneath.
 

Rwe2156

DrBob
Senior User
I use bowling alley wax. However, my workspace is under the house, stays at 50-60% humidity and 50-70 degrees year round. Things will rust, but it takes a long while. I never have seen machines "sweating".
i live in Florida. A couple weeks ago, it was down in the 30's every night for 5 days with highs in the 60's but the humidity was never over 60%. Then bam, it was 40 one morning and got up to almost 80 and it rained. When I got home from work ,there was almost water dripping off the bed of my 20" planer. Yeah, it happens but it's a tropical thing.
 

BrianBDH

New User
Brian
Here is the new saw with the Delta fence installed


Sawstop2.JPG


Money was/isdefinitely a consideration or I would have bought a cabinet saw with the betterfence. By the time I have finished running a dedicated 20 amp circuit in mygarage, buying a 12 gauge extension cord, transferred the fence, built the newoutfeed table and the new router table on the right wing; I will be into thisproject for around $2200.

I knew what it was going to cost and I am very happy to have the safety andpeace of mind that this technology brings. Do I wish it was cheaper? Darnright! But I don't have any buyer's remorse.

Now I am just ready to cut something! Using the main saw to make the outfeedand the router table will be a good trial.


Still working out the outfeed table plans. Thanks for all the suggestions so far.

Brian



 

BrianBDH

New User
Brian
Worked on my outfeed table today. Pretty happy with the way it worked out and I saved a few $$ by re-using the old outfeed table.

Its always level with the table because it is hinged and braced off the table.

IMG_10954.JPG


I might add a edge piece at some point to reduce chipping of the melomine, but I have used this same piece for several years already.

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Brian
 

Hmerkle

Board of Directors, Development Director
Hank
Corporate Member
ABSOLUTELY BRILLIANT Brian!


Every out-feed on contractor's saws I have seen has some "super-secret hinge-linkage mechanism" to make it go around the motor.

What a way to keep it simple and be able to roll the saw right up to the wall or another machine!
 

scoobycarolan

New User
Scoobs
Brian, congrats! I lived with a crappy $250 Skil table saw for several years and INSTANTLY everything the sawstop touches is dead straight and incredible. It looks like you've already been given a sick outfeed table plan, what you should do now is make a killer crosscut sled. I had my saw for 5 months before I built one and let me tell you, I can size parts up so much faster now and it just gives me total confidence that my X-cuts are dead 90 degrees. I also never bothered running nice blades, but I got a Freud thin kerf glue line rip and man, its like a whole new world. I'm keeping the blade it came with as my backup. CONGRATS!
 

Roy G

Roy
Senior User
Two things to try for your rust problem. First is to set up a fan to constantly move the air. This keeps the moisture from settling out on your saw's top. Another is to make your cross cut sled the same size as the top and keep it on the saw except when ripping.

Roy G
 
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