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  1. #1
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    Bandsaw wheel bearing question

    My 14 inch bandsaw (18 years old) is starting to make odd random clicking noises that I have traced to the lower wheel bearing (probably). I really don't want to take it apart this close to Christmas so my question is assuming it is the wheel bearing, what kind of damage can I cause if I continue to use it for another couple of weeks. The project I'm working on uses western cedar so that is what I will be cutting. Thanks.

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    Re: Bandsaw wheel bearing question

    You should be OK for a few days, sometimes even years. Get the number off bearings (there are two,)and stop at local Fastenal store and have them get you some. Be sure and buy 2RS, meaning sealed. As for Fastenal bearing quality, our daughter's Honda Civic has over 200K on a 6203 - 2RS bearing from Fastenal. It's in the tension pulley for the serpentine belt, which drive all the accessories (AC, alternator, PS pump.) Put new (Fastenal) bearings in alternator on our Ford Areostar. Both bearings were less than $15, plus brushes (about $5.) While lot cheaper than $200 for a reman alternator. Because the 6203 is such a common bearing, I keep some on hand, even though it's less than 3 miles to Fastenal
    Last edited by junquecol; 12-20-2018 at 10:04 PM.

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  4. #3
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    Re: Bandsaw wheel bearing question

    "Clicking noises" can be a lot of things. Usually its little more than a loose set screw in an aluminum pulley. Aluminum has to 'spring' to it so a setscrew against a shaft has to be checked from time to time. Let it go for too long and the pulley will wallow or the shaft will wear.

    An 18-year old 14" band saw isn't much of a description for determining bearing size. If a Delta saw the bearing size will be 6204. If Asian saw, who knows, but either 6204 or 6203 size. Bruce is right on about getting double seals.

    What if its not the bearings, but indeed the lower shaft. Chances are that if its clicking already, then the shaft is toast. Continuing running the saw will make a ruined shaft even more ruined. Below are photos of an Asian import that did some clicking..... maybe even more than 'some' clicking.




    1 clicking - 1.jpg

    1 clicking - 2.jpg

  5. #4
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    Re: Bandsaw wheel bearing question

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom from Clayton View Post
    My 14 inch bandsaw (18 years old) is starting to make odd random clicking noises that I have traced to the lower wheel bearing (probably). I really don't want to take it apart this close to Christmas so my question is assuming it is the wheel bearing, what kind of damage can I cause if I continue to use it for another couple of weeks. The project I'm working on uses western cedar so that is what I will be cutting. Thanks.
    The risks that you run by waiting are only if the bearing starts to either lock up or disintegrate. We just repaired on of the sawmills where a bearing froze up and started spinning on the shaft.

    What should have been a 30 minute repair turned out to be a full day due to the hassles of getting the seized parts apart.

    In addition to Fastenal, Motion Industries in Garner offers very high quality bearings. Industrial Suppliers such as Cruco in Sanford also carry them, but often times they are a lower, Chinese grade bearing.

    When you press the bearing in and out, be sure to only press on the outer race.

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    Re: Bandsaw wheel bearing question

    Quote Originally Posted by scsmith42 View Post
    When you press the bearing in and out, be sure to only press on the outer race.
    I know that's a typo, but just to clarify...
    Pressing on a bearing, the INNER race should take the load.
    Usually when removing a bearing its because the bearing is bad so where you press or pull on a bad bearing will be more a matter of convenience rather than technical protocol.

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    Re: Bandsaw wheel bearing question

    Quote Originally Posted by bob vaughan View Post
    I know that's a typo, but just to clarify...
    Pressing on a bearing, the INNER race should take the load.
    Usually when removing a bearing its because the bearing is bad so where you press or pull on a bad bearing will be more a matter of convenience rather than technical protocol.

    Bob, that was not a typo on my part (but I recognize that you and I may be thinking about this in two different ways).

    Typically band wheel bearings are pressed into the wheel itself, and they float on an axle, shaft or spindle. In other applications - such as rear axles on 60's and 70's vintage automobiles - the bearings are pressed onto the axle and slipped into the housing.

    Presuming that his band wheel's have the bearings pressed into the wheels, if you install them by pressing on the inner race you will damage the bearing due to the fact that the press load is being transferred through the ball bearings to the outer race- where the friction occurs as it is installed.

    I'm presuming that you're thinking of installations where the outer race floats in a housing, and the bearing is a "press fit" onto a shaft. In those instances, you are completely correct in that the inner race should take the load.

    So let me correct my earlier statement.

    Tom, be sure to press on the race that is the friction fit into your application. If the inner race is a slip fit over a bolt, shaft or axle, then the bearing should be pressed into place by only applying force to the outer race.

    On the other hand, if it's a press fit onto the spindle and slips into the wheel, then only apply force to the inner race.

    Applying installation force to the slip fit bearing race will in all liklihood damage the bearing.

    Scott

    Nomenclature-of-a-deep-groove-ball-bearing-5 (1).png

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    Re: Bandsaw wheel bearing question

    Scott,
    All good points. Most 14" band saws that I know of have the lower bearings in the main body castings and are pressed on the shaft. Many of the Chinese/Taiwan/Italian larger band saws will have the bearings in the wheels. This convention may have changes with the advent of the various designs of the sheet metal bodied Chinese/Taiwan saws being offered today but the original poster said the saw was 18 years old.

    ...lets hope its nothing more than a loose pulley, but this does make for an interesting conversation.

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    Re: Bandsaw wheel bearing question

    Thanks for the early Christmas present. Tightened the pulley and the wheel nuts and no clicking so far. Only the lower wheel could be tightened - it wasn't loose but did get snugged up a bit. Once again NCWoodworkers come through.

  10. #9
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    Re: Bandsaw wheel bearing question

    I'm glad it ended well for you. It doesn't always work out that way.
    The setscrews used in pulleys (aluminum or otherwise) are much harder than the shafts and keyways they press against. What can happen is that a loose pulley will become a hammering device for the point of the hardened setscrew. If left too long, bad things happen to the shaft as shown on the top shaft of the below photo.



    1 loose - 1.jpg

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