Festool (Ad #2)

Special Events in the next 30 days

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 20
  1. #1
    User
    Nickname
    wally
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Stanfield, NC
    Posts
    70
    Visit Freq
    0.42 visits/week
    Threads
    14
    Classifieds
    0

    My most frustrating tool

    I am a little embarrassed to post this, but I suspect that we all have a tool that just seems to fight us at every turn. Mine is a 25" Woodtech dual drum sander. I have a 20" planer, so this machine is used just to flatten boards and panels and save hours with a belt sander.

    I just cannot seem to keep the belts from burning. I know that this happens quicker with Cherry, Maple and Walnut, but Red and White Oak ?? give me a break. I guess this post is somewhere between a rant and a plea for help..Let me give you some specifics. The machine is set up properly and I have been on the customer service line several times-not much help there. I am running 100 and 120 grit belts purchase from Industrial Abrasives in PA (next order goes to Klingspor.) I have tried many different belt speeds across the platen, nothing seems to make a difference. Cut depth is very light at 1/16 on each pass. I have a good Oneida Cyclone dust collection system. Still, it seems I make just a couple passes through the sander and here come the black streaks. What I thought would save me a lot of time from the chore of sanding has not worked well for me.

    Any thought from the community? Has anyone out there had actual experience similar to mine and beat it? Your thoughts, and maybe your prayers are requested.

  2. #2
    Board of Directors
    President
    Corporate Member
    DQ
    Mike Davis's Avatar
    Nickname
    Mike
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Walnut Cove, NC
    Posts
    12,564
    Visit Freq
    6.96 visits/week
    Threads
    736
    Classifieds
    0

    Re: My most frustrating tool

    Try reducing the depth of cut to 1/32 or even less. 1/16 is a lot to take off with 120 grit paper. Or switch to 40 grit for the first passes to really cut deep like 1/16 inch.



    One machine can do the work of 50 ordinary men. No machine can do the work of one extraordinary man." -Elbert Hubbard

    WWFD

  3. The following user says Thank You to Mike Davis for this useful post:


  4. #3
    Corporate Member
    DQ

    Nickname
    Rob
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Wadesboro, NC
    Posts
    110
    Visit Freq
    6.92 visits/week
    Threads
    30
    Classifieds
    0

    Re: My most frustrating tool

    Wally,

    I, too, have the Woodtech 25" double drum sander. I have had problems with burning particularly on cherry but can get most other species through without a problem. A couple of suggestions. Use Alumina Zirconia belts for sanding. I also use a 100 grit front drum and 120 grit back drum. These blue belts seem to me to cause far less burning. I agree with Mike, reduce your sanding pass to 1/32" or less with these two grits. I take a very light pass each time. It takes more time but I get better results. I'm not sure what to suggest for feed rate. I use a moderate (about half way on the speed dial) rate. Too slow and you increase the heat build up, too fast and you overload the machine. I really love this machine for the flat finish I can get on panels, etc. It can be a little frustrating with burning and a belt tearing shortly after installing but otherwise I have had good experiences with it.

    Rob Liles

  5. #4
    Corporate Member
    DQ
    FredP's Avatar
    Nickname
    Fred (61)
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    franklinton, nc
    Posts
    5,677
    Visit Freq
    6.96 visits/week
    Threads
    208
    Classifieds
    0

    Re: My most frustrating tool

    I have the same sander. 1/16 is way too much. I use 80 and 120 grit and only take off 1/64 or so each pass. Slow the feed down as well. Cherry maple and most exotics will burn some on any drum sander. Drums get hot.
    fred p If it ain't broke you aint trying hard enough

  6. #5
    Board of Directors
    Events Director
    Corporate Member
    DQ
    Berta's Avatar
    Nickname
    Roberta
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Cameron, NC
    Posts
    3,166
    Visit Freq
    6.35 visits/week
    Threads
    291
    Classifieds
    0

    Re: My most frustrating tool

    I have the old Delta one belt. And I agree 1/32 is the most. Just enough to start the sanding. Also, very light touches throughout the entire process.
    Berta

  7. #6
    Corporate Member
    DQ
    JohnW's Avatar
    Nickname
    John (64)
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    849
    Visit Freq
    5.08 visits/week
    Threads
    58
    Classifieds
    0

    Re: My most frustrating tool

    I had same issue when I first used my drum sander. I was taking a very small bite but still got burning. Someone suggested I speed up my feed rate. That made a big difference. I was going slow thinking it would help take pressure on the belt and drum lessen or eliminate burning. Turns out you can go too slow.

  8. #7
    Senior User
    DQ
    Skymaster's Avatar
    Nickname
    Jack (78)
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Zebulon, NC
    Posts
    1,856
    Visit Freq
    6.69 visits/week
    Threads
    43
    Classifieds
    0

    Re: My most frustrating tool

    +1 on all above i have a 22-44 1/64 per pass anything else burn baby burn

  9. The following 2 users say Thank You to Skymaster :


  10. #8
    Senior User
    DQ

    Nickname
    Chris
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Ayden, NC
    Posts
    1,213
    Visit Freq
    6.88 visits/week
    Threads
    185
    Classifieds
    0

    Re: My most frustrating tool

    Quote Originally Posted by Skymaster View Post
    +1 on all above i have a 22-44 1/64 per pass anything else burn baby burn
    +2....I have a 22-44 also

  11. #9
    Senior User
    DQ
    frankc4113's Avatar
    Nickname
    Frank (77)
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Pinehurst, NC
    Posts
    230
    Visit Freq
    7.04 visits/week
    Threads
    24
    Classifieds
    0

    Re: My most frustrating tool

    When you're feeding narrower stock through machine, prior to putting it through, place it on an angle so that you use the entire sanding drum on the machine and not just a couple inches or so. That drum gets hot so if you can spread the job so to use the entire 25" or whatever the size of the drum is, you then spread the heat over the entire drum.
    Also, taking the smallest sanding cut goes a long way in preserving the entire machine and saving costs on sandpaper. That stuff isn't cheap.
    In addition, much of the stock you feed through the machine may vary ever so slightly so what can start out as 3/4" stock, may very well become 13/16" as it goes through so that the initial 1/32" or so you want to initially remove, now becomes 2 or 3 times that amount.

  12. #10
    Administrator Corporate Member
    DQ
    ehpoole's Avatar
    Nickname
    Ethan (47)
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Anderson, SC
    Posts
    6,041
    Visit Freq
    6.69 visits/week
    Threads
    207
    Classifieds
    0

    Re: My most frustrating tool

    For woods that are prone to burning you will want slower speeds and shallower cuts to greatly reduce the heat buildup during sanding and that cut depth decreases as the grit number increases. Removing 1/16” at 120-grit feels awfully aggressive to me and it is likely to generate a considerable amount of heat. One does not ordinarily use sanding drums/belts for major dimensioning changes as that is what thickness planers are for.

    As also mentioned above, placing narrower pieces on a diagonal also helps to reduce heat buildup as then for a given section of your belt the narrower pass dimensions means that section of belt spends less time trapped between the belt and wood and so has both less time to heat up and more time to shed heat.

    But you will still want to dial back on the aggressive cut depths when using higher grits. If you need major dimensioning changes and can not use a thickness planer then either make more shallower passes at your 120-grit or consider using a more aggressive grit like 60-80 grit and that should keep things cooler when combined with slower belt speeds.

    Good luck!

  13. #11
    Senior User
    DQ

    Nickname
    Pete (67)
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Tallahassee, FL
    Posts
    52
    Visit Freq
    3.73 visits/week
    Threads
    9
    Classifieds
    0

    Re: My most frustrating tool

    As everyone has already said light passes and fast enough but not too fast feed is key. For me DC suction was key as well. Are you sure you are getting good enough suction at the machine? No blockages, major leaks, or anything? Dust buildup on the belt can cause the problem.

  14. #12
    Senior User
    DQ
    walnutjerry's Avatar
    Nickname
    Jerry
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Salisbury, NC
    Posts
    1,616
    Visit Freq
    6.12 visits/week
    Threads
    95
    Classifieds
    0

    Re: My most frustrating tool

    I have a "Woodmaster" 37" drum sander but the principle is the same. 1/16 is way too heavy a cut for a sander as others have stated. A sander should work in thousandths--------not sixteenths. One full turn with the crank is 1/16 " on my sander------1/8 turn is how I use mine and 2 or 3 passes at the same setting. I also clean the drum with the cleaning stick ever so often to remove the dust the collector does not pickup. I also use a moderate feed rate. Never have the burning problem. 120 grit is usually what I run.
    We make a living by what we get...............We make a life by what we give

  15. The following user says Thank You to walnutjerry for this useful post:


  16. #13
    Board of Directors
    Treasurer
    Corporate Member
    DQ
    KenOfCary's Avatar
    Nickname
    Ken
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Floyd, VA
    Posts
    7,832
    Visit Freq
    6.81 visits/week
    Threads
    525
    Classifieds
    0

    Re: My most frustrating tool

    Planers are for removing stock and flattening boards - Drum sanders are for finish work - go lightly when using them - as others have said.
    I don't believe in Astrology. I'm a Sagittarius and we're skeptical.

    "May the grain be with you" - Roy Underhill

  17. #14
    User
    Nickname
    wally
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Stanfield, NC
    Posts
    70
    Visit Freq
    0.42 visits/week
    Threads
    14
    Classifieds
    0

    Re: My most frustrating tool

    Clearly I have been taking too heavy a cut. Not sure what one turn of the handle on my machine is equivalent to in depth, but I have always used 1/8 turn of the handle. Need to experiment with less movement of the handle. I may also be feeding the stock too slow, thinking I am going in the right direction with speed over the platen, when in fact I was actually building heat. I do run boards through at an angle for all but the last cut so that I am using the whole length of the roller. Time to change the belts (again) and experiment with some lighter depth of cuts. I may also try some of the blue belts that Klingspor offers and see how that changes things. Thanks to everybody who responded.

    Wally

  18. #15
    Senior User
    DQ
    Skymaster's Avatar
    Nickname
    Jack (78)
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Zebulon, NC
    Posts
    1,856
    Visit Freq
    6.69 visits/week
    Threads
    43
    Classifieds
    0

    Re: My most frustrating tool

    Usually right on the machine is a data plate, or a stamping in the hand wheel stating what 1 revolution is. My sander is 1 rev equals 1/16, so i go 1/4 turn per pass. also when you are close to final dimension, reverse your pcs and run em thru the SAME setting this will flatten better if your head is slightly out of parallel

Similar Threads

  1. Tool for dremel tool bits
    By danmart77 in forum General Woodworking
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 07-27-2016, 06:30 AM
  2. Tool Challenges (cooperative tool tests)
    By SteveHall in forum Power Tools and Their Use
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-09-2008, 10:25 PM
  3. Handy Tool or Scary Tool
    By sapwood in forum Safety & Health
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 10-04-2007, 09:38 AM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-18-2007, 09:26 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •