Festool (Ad #2)

Special Events in the next 30 days

Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Corporate Member
    DQ

    Nickname
    Mike (65)
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Cary, NC
    Posts
    1,826
    Visit Freq
    6.92 visits/week
    Threads
    339
    Classifieds
    0

    Dado Clean-out Bit

    Is there any reason not to use this bit to create shallow dadoes? My collection of (sharp) router bits is somewhat slim at the moment, but I already have one of these that I've never used. The bearing would cause it to work well with my router dado jig I'm trying to make.

    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Board of Directors
    President
    Corporate Member
    DQ
    Mike Davis's Avatar
    Nickname
    Mike
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Walnut Cove, NC
    Posts
    12,660
    Visit Freq
    6.96 visits/week
    Threads
    746
    Classifieds
    0

    Re: Dado Clean-out Bit

    Looks like that is 1/2"? is that the size of the wood to be inserted or will you make two passes?

    If two be sure to cut in the correct direction each time.



    One machine can do the work of 50 ordinary men. No machine can do the work of one extraordinary man." -Elbert Hubbard

    WWFD

  3. #3
    Papa Red Senior User
    DQ
    red's Avatar
    Nickname
    Red
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Denver, NC
    Posts
    2,335
    Visit Freq
    4.38 visits/week
    Threads
    49
    Classifieds
    0

    Re: Dado Clean-out Bit

    It will work fine.

    Red
    Red

  4. #4
    Senior User
    DQ

    Nickname
    Jim
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Lexington, SC
    Posts
    1,509
    Visit Freq
    5.00 visits/week
    Threads
    24
    Classifieds
    0

    Re: Dado Clean-out Bit

    I agree with Red. I have a similar router bit I use to make shallow dados with a router jig. One side of the jig moves so you can set it to the piece that will go into the dado. Works well. The dados I make with this are 1/8 or less deep. Their main purpose is to align the parts during assembly. I would use a more robust bit to make a deeper dado but for a shallow one, that sort of bit is what I use.

  5. #5
    Corporate Member
    DQ

    Nickname
    Mike (65)
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Cary, NC
    Posts
    1,826
    Visit Freq
    6.92 visits/week
    Threads
    339
    Classifieds
    0

    Re: Dado Clean-out Bit

    Mike, it will be two passes with cuts in the right direction.

    Thanks.

  6. #6
    Board of Directors
    President
    Corporate Member
    DQ
    Mike Davis's Avatar
    Nickname
    Mike
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Walnut Cove, NC
    Posts
    12,660
    Visit Freq
    6.96 visits/week
    Threads
    746
    Classifieds
    0

    Re: Dado Clean-out Bit

    I always mark my jig so I cut into the cut, when I first started using a router I didn't mark my jig and accidentally made a climb cut and the router got away from me.



    One machine can do the work of 50 ordinary men. No machine can do the work of one extraordinary man." -Elbert Hubbard

    WWFD

  7. #7
    Senior User
    Nickname
    Jeff
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Rougemont, NC
    Posts
    7,588
    Visit Freq
    6.85 visits/week
    Threads
    649
    Classifieds
    0

    Re: Dado Clean-out Bit

    Why don't you make dados by cross cutting the board with a dado blade and your new SawStop? Just curious but the router bit and your jig should work too.

    https://www.amanatool.com/45460-s-ca...l?ff=1&fp=8395
    Last edited by Jeff; 08-08-2018 at 02:29 PM.

  8. #8
    Board of Directors
    President
    Corporate Member
    DQ
    Mike Davis's Avatar
    Nickname
    Mike
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Walnut Cove, NC
    Posts
    12,660
    Visit Freq
    6.96 visits/week
    Threads
    746
    Classifieds
    0

    Re: Dado Clean-out Bit

    Long boards are a little hard to handle and can slip ruining the dado. Really need a sliding table for that. A sled will work if it is pretty wide.



    One machine can do the work of 50 ordinary men. No machine can do the work of one extraordinary man." -Elbert Hubbard

    WWFD

  9. #9
    Senior User
    DQ

    Nickname
    Jim
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Lexington, SC
    Posts
    1,509
    Visit Freq
    5.00 visits/week
    Threads
    24
    Classifieds
    0

    Re: Dado Clean-out Bit

    I've found a jig for my tracksaw track to be a great way to make longer dados. It holds my PC690 router well, even has micro adjustment, and it is nice because, just like the tracksaw, the router cannot deviate from the line of the track. If you clamp the track, the router is going to follow the line. I guess if you have an automatic feeder for your table saw it might do the same but I don't and having the material move slightly away from the fence is a risk. My track saw and the jig were made by DeWalt.

    Climb cutting is sometimes a good thing but it can make control difficult. It is not a way to cut away much wood. A shallow climb cut pass can minimize fuzziness along the cut line. It it happens unexpectedly, it is not hard to ding your jig or workpiece.

    My bit like that has a 1/4 shank and that is one of the reasons I take only shallow cuts with it. Even a good collet can slip on a 1/4 shank bit. So I do not try to take deep cuts. A lot of the time the dado is part of a glued and screwed joint and I want adequate material at the bottom of the dado for the screw to go through.
    Last edited by JimD; 08-08-2018 at 03:30 PM.

  10. #10
    Corporate Member
    DQ

    Nickname
    Mike (65)
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Cary, NC
    Posts
    1,826
    Visit Freq
    6.92 visits/week
    Threads
    339
    Classifieds
    0

    Re: Dado Clean-out Bit

    I was milling a slot in a piece of plywood last night using my router table and fence. Part of the cut requires doing a climb cut. Sure enough, the board moved a little, so the slot has some variability to it. It doesn't matter in this case since it's just a utility clip idea that I decided to use. The next time I have to do a climb cut, I will hopefully use some sort of guide that keeps the board from moving away from the fence.

  11. #11
    Staff Advisor
    Corporate Member
    DQ
    Joe Scharle's Avatar
    Nickname
    Joe (75)
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    New Bern, NC
    Posts
    5,564
    Visit Freq
    3.85 visits/week
    Threads
    686
    Classifieds
    0

    Re: Dado Clean-out Bit

    Mike, I use a dado cleanout bit mostly for hinge mortises. They work nicely if the hinge corners are 1/2 " radia. However, I setup my large dado jigs to use 3/8" or 1/2" spiral downcut bits. Downcut spiral leave a crisp entry edge. And I always use the jig that will require at least 2 passes for the desired dado width. So if I had only one jig, it would be the one that uses a 3/8" bit.
    The face of my jigs show which router, which bit and which directions to push the router. These pics may give you some ideas...





    Last edited by Joe Scharle; 08-09-2018 at 11:45 AM.
    Always be yourself because the people that matter don't mind, and the ones who mind, don't matter.

  12. The following 3 users say Thank You to Joe Scharle :


  13. #12
    Senior User
    Nickname
    DrBob
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Baldwin, FL
    Posts
    737
    Visit Freq
    3.73 visits/week
    Threads
    62
    Classifieds
    0

    Re: Dado Clean-out Bit

    You can use it, just be ware of tear out.

    This can be alleviated by pre-scoring the dado with a sharp knife.

  14. The following user says Thank You to Rwe2156 for this useful post:


Similar Threads

  1. Shop is CLEAN
    By CrealBilly in forum General Woodworking
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 09-28-2012, 09:03 AM
  2. Another scofflaw comes clean.
    By jazzflute in forum Who We Are
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 03-09-2012, 05:18 PM
  3. Keeping' it clean (the air)
    By CarvedTones in forum Safety & Health
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 08-20-2008, 06:38 PM
  4. Clean-up CA Glue?
    By WoodWrangler in forum General Woodworking
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 11-20-2007, 06:35 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •