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  1. #16
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    Re: Question re: Patterns for Turning

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Clemmons View Post
    I just didn't know how to show that in SketchUp.
    Do you want to learn how?
    SketchUp Authorized Training Center

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    Re: Question re: Patterns for Turning

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Clemmons View Post



    As for that undimensioned radius, that is a transition from one known dimension (3d) to another (2d). Once I have the two diameters established, it is a simple matter to freehand that radius.
    That explains why its non tangent as well, just not sure where it went.

  3. #18
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    Re: Question re: Patterns for Turning

    Carlyle Lynch did a bunch of measured drawings from antiques. His papers are really great for reproductions.

    This guy just uses a simple story stick and five minutes time.
    stair spindle- using primarily the Skew chisel - YouTube

  4. #19
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    Re: Question re: Patterns for Turning

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Richards View Post
    Do you want to learn how?
    Eventually, yes, but not just yet. Actually thought about calling you when I was doing it, but decided this is good enough to get me in the shop. Thank you for the offer. I really appreciate the help you've given me on other issues I've had.
    I'll gladly tell you how I do something. Just please don't confuse that with the right way to do it, and almost certainly not the only way.


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  6. #20
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    Re: Question re: Patterns for Turning

    Quote Originally Posted by bob vaughan View Post
    Carlyle Lynch did a bunch of measured drawings from antiques. His papers are really great for reproductions.

    This guy just uses a simple story stick and five minutes time.
    stair spindle- using primarily the Skew chisel - YouTube
    I agree Bob. Given the choice, I would take a Carlyle Lynch drawing any day. His work was outstanding.
    I'll gladly tell you how I do something. Just please don't confuse that with the right way to do it, and almost certainly not the only way.


  7. #21
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    Re: Question re: Patterns for Turning

    That is the type drawing I like to work from----------I do make a story stick and write the diameters on it where changes occur. The story stick saves a lot of time when doing undercarriage parts for a set of chairs.

    Jerry
    We make a living by what we get...............We make a life by what we give

  8. #22
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    Re: Question re: Patterns for Turning

    Ditto. I make a story stick from the supplied drawing and add my own measured dimensions.
    A rough initial piece is made and once approved by customer I complete the additional pieces.
    That is only if they have not provided me an original piece they want duplicated.

  9. #23
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    Re: Question re: Patterns for Turning

    If you are going to do custom reproductions of existing parts that need to be un-noticeable when they are set, you have to do a careful illustration with the diameter sizes at each of the positions.

    The further the legs are from each other when you assemble the chair or table the harder it is for the viewer to find the variations. So distance is good.

    Not to be a show off like most of the guys I see on Youtube doing the same leg they have been turning for 20 years and making it look simple and easy if you go out and get a skew. You can see I have done lots of spindle turning. I don't like turning. I do it as a means to an end. I think the turnings are what makes the chairs I build look good or not so good.

    This thread is about illustrations/patterns and story sticks. I think they are a must to get started as a turner and they are important if you are turning some new form. As soon as I turn out a leg, I mount it behind the blank I am turning with some homemade holding devices and I never use the stick again.

    Looking at the 2 styles of legs below I know the largest diameter of the bamboo leg and the largest diameter of the baluster leg. Turn cylinders for each type of leg. Do 50 while your at it. You will be fast.







    I usually don't turn curly but the customer is always right as they say. One Rhode Island style and one baluster style



    The key is repetition. With all the legs I have turned, I still have to work into it if I haven't done any turning for a while. Kinda like playin' the guitar. Hopefully you still have some callus on you finger tips??









    I still use these at the lathe




    This is a time saver but truthfully I don't use it that much after I make my sample leg.






    You can not turn these legs if you do not know how to sharpen your tools. Nuf said.






    legs, stretchers, arm posts all need story sticks to get started. Sadly I don't have any these days.. I just take one down and use it to put my tick marks on the cylinder then its beads and coves.






    middle leg above you can see a chip in the birds beak .. no problem that goes to the inside of the chair carriage and the viewer will not see it.


    Here are 2 bamboos side by side. No.. they are not exactly the same. This is the closest the legs will ever be. The painted legs behind the 2 curly types are all different but hard to tell.

    So.. do I think you need to start with a detailed stick? Yes.



  10. #24
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    Re: Question re: Patterns for Turning

    Quote Originally Posted by bob vaughan View Post
    Carlyle Lynch did a bunch of measured drawings from antiques. His papers are really great for reproductions.

    This guy just uses a simple story stick and five minutes time.
    stair spindle- using primarily the Skew chisel - YouTube
    Bob
    I have a dozen or more of his plans. His plans are just great.

    A long time ago, a man wanted to trade Lynch plans off to me for some rifle work. Well I got the plans(maybe 10) and you are right they are nice. I thought I would add an experience I had with Mr. Lynch as he went way out of his way to help me and I am grateful now for somethings he said to me about hanging in there.

    I was married in Winston-Salem back in 1977 thus danmart77. Whenever I went to WS I had to go down to Old Salem to visit the Single Brothers House and in particular the Vogler Gunsmith room. Right across from the gunsmith's shop was the cabinet makers shop. It was there that I fell for the Strauss desk and bookcase some of you might recall Charlie Buchanan building in cherry.



    I wanted to build the one above back in the 70's but I was over in Europe and it was hard to get measurements.



    I wrote to C Lynch when a man told me about this Virginian who illustrates lots of pieces from Old Salem and pieces found in the region. Remember, this is before the internet and email and he took the time to write me a personal letter encouraging me to build the desk above. He had just completed getting the plans printed and set me on my way. The plans were great. Its a bad photo but the desk sits in my house today. I built one for my wife as well.



    This is a candle box from a C. Lynch set of plans.


    Still haven't built the cherry desk above but I did something with veneer and solid walnut a little more elaborate from Pennsylvania.









    If there are viewers on the forum that like to work from detailed plans you can send me a PM and I will see what plans I have stored away some place. I can list them if interested.

    I will loan or sell as I don't use them these days and I hate to just have them sitting around.

    later





  11. #25
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    Re: Question re: Patterns for Turning

    Dan,
    That furniture is jaw-dropping gorgeous. I don't have the vocabulary of superlatives to adequately describe it any other way.

    On the Galbert caliper, I thought it was an overpriced gadget when I first saw it. I thought about it for a week or two and decided that I would take a chance. It was well worth it. I think that was about six or seven years ago. For doing one off turnings or maybe four alike, its a great time saver to get you in the ball park for final detailing.

  12. #26
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    Re: Question re: Patterns for Turning

    On the Galbert caliper, I thought it was an overpriced gadget when I first saw it. I thought about it for a week or two and decided that I would take a chance. It was well worth it. I think that was about six or seven years ago. For doing one off turnings or maybe four alike, its a great time saver to get you in the ball park for final detailing.

    Thank you for the compliments. I do like making desks.

    The Galbert tool is OK and I tip my hat to Pete on that one. Like many of the 2nd generation chairbuilders, Pete is about 80 teaching, 10 redesigning and 10 building chairs to sell. At 1500/chair its a tight market. Most want to build their own -- usually just one. When folks find out how much work goes in a chair, most rethink their original plan. More in another thread.


    My solution/substitute for the Galbert tool: I take a 1/16 thick piece of plastic about a foot long by 3" wide. This will be my caliper. I use it like a caliper as I cut in with my parting tool. I don't have to push and read and I don't have to reset a caliper 3 times. It is quick. Its kind of like turning a 3/4 tenon: you grab your 3/4 open end wrench and cut till the tool slips on. Done.

    How do I make it?

    I take it to the tablesaw and cut the slots/openings to the diameters of the points on the leg.

    For
    example:
    The fat part of the bamboo is 1 5/8" and the upper bamboo is 1 1/4" then the narrow part between is 1" so I cut three slots in the plastic tool for bamboo legs. Now the tool hangs on the wall and just pull it down to get the diameters. So you ask where to you measure your points. After turning one leg and mounting it in the holder(this sits just behind the blank I am turning and it doesn't move till I finish turning bamboo legs.)



    As you can see in the photos above, I get on the lathe and I just keep getting faster as I repeat. I will turn out 60 or 70 legs in a day and throw them in a bin and use them up. Lots less stress if you make a mistake on drill day. Just toss in the stove and grab another. My head is still positive.. no sparks.

    just another way



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