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Thread: Bandsaw problem

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    Bandsaw problem

    I am having trouble with my bandsaw breaking blades a lot here lately... any suggestions on how to alleviate this problem???

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    Re: Bandsaw problem

    You can text me at (704) 745-7121 with any help you have

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    Re: Bandsaw problem

    Can you be a little more vague about what you're sawing, how you're doing it, and with what (brand of bandsaw and size, also type and dimensions of the blade 1/2" xtpi or 3/4 ytpi made by???????

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    Re: Bandsaw problem

    You said "here lately" so are we to assume you had a much longer life from the same type/brand/size of blades in the past?

    If so what has changed?



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    Re: Bandsaw problem

    MRay,

    I did not have a chance to answer earlier, but please understand that as a rule Internet forums do not text replies to questions and thus such requests can be viewed as rude in some contexts, which I mention in the event that you are new to forums and unaware of that custom. The reason, quite simply, is that forums exist to freely share and dispense knowledge to the widest possible audience and not just an audience of one. Odds are that at some point another party will find themselves with a very similar problem down the road and they will be desperately searching for the same answers, and few things are more frustrating than finding an existing thread that discusses their very problem only the all important answer was never included in that same thread because it was answered offline...so they still do not have an answer (at least not without having to hack your phone to get at it, but that is a bit much for most!).

    You do not give us much to go on, but there are a handful of reasons why bandsaw blades will typically break.

    In no particular order:

    1) Too much tension was used while tensioning the blade (a common mistake for beginners and which can also potentially damage the bandsaw if too excessive). Even with bandsaws that include a tensioning gauge, they are more a suggestion than an accurate guide of how much to tension as the gauge assumes a blade of perfect length, and some manufacturers routinely make blades that are a bit over or under length which affects the accuracy of such gauges. Learn to gauge proper tension by way of deflection (pressing laterally on the blade after setting up blade guides) or by plucking the blade and becoming familiar with the tone produced (it should be a clean, unmuddied, tone that is usually very low in frequency -- if it is muddy then you likely have too little tension). That said, you only need enough tension to make a clean cut without the blade wandering or creating a barrel (rounded) cut, any tension much beyond that point is more than was required.

    2) The blade suddenly jammed in operation and the sudden shock loading broke the blade (this can occur if you overfeed an aggressive blade or use a blade with too few teeth engaged with the stock, strike a nail or other very hard object, or if the blade guides (upper or lower) are set too close to the blade such that they do not allow room for the weld joint to safely pass through them without binding. Always manually feed the the weld joint past both upper and lower blade guides after setting them to ensure that the blade passes cleanly and without binding. If you hear a pronounced "thud...thud...thud" or, especially, "bang...bang...bang" in operation then you almost certainly have the blade guides set much too tightly.

    3) A bad weld joint -- not especially common but it can happen. More common for those who weld or braze their own blade stock than with commercial gear, but even manufacturers do make bad welds occasionally. Personally I have encountered more misaligned weld joints than actua faulty welds, though both result in an equally useless blade that must be returned if still within the return period.

    4) Over-bending the blade to too tight a radius, especially when re-folding a blade for storage.

    5) If breaking at a location other than the weld joint and not being excessively bent to a tight radius then there is always the possibility of the steel band stock having been overhardened, though most blades are only hardened at the teeth and keep the band material a relatively mild and compliant steel so that it does not stress fracture prematurely.

    6) This is effectively a continuation of #4 and #5, but running too thick of a blade (the actual band thickness, not blade width -- though the two tend to roughly correlate) for your bandsaw's wheel diameter. The thicker the band stock material the more rapidly stress fractures will accumulate and the tighter your wheel diameter the more rapidly those fractures accumulate as well...so the combination of an overly thick blade combined with a bandsaw with too small wheels can rapidly lead to premature blad breakage. These sorts of fracture are pretty randomly distributed around the blade with no single area more likely than another to fail...the failure point is just the first point at which all the accumulated fractures finally all lined up and the tension overwhelmed them.

    I hope the above may be of some help to you in solving your problem.

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    Re: Bandsaw problem

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Davis View Post
    You said "here lately" so are we to assume you had a much longer life from the same type/brand/size of blades in the past?

    If so what has changed?
    thank you HPoole... your post was very helpful.

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