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Thread: Workshop wiring

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    Workshop wiring

    The more I research this subject, the more I discover how complicated it is.

    In the UK we have a single voltage and a single outlet/plug type; you just buy your equipment, plug it in, and use it.

    Not so here.

    The situation is I need to tell the builder now what additional outlets I need them to run now before drywall goes up.
    Ideally I'd get 5 x 120V 20A and 5 x 240V 20A/30A but at $150 and $300 each respectively, I need to keep it to the absolute minimum to avoid shelling out $thousands on wiring.

    I thought I could get away with 2 x 120V 20A and 1 x 240V 40A (total cost $600) and use the 240V to run two tools simultaneously.
    Apparently that's not possible. I would need to have another dedicated 240V 20A/30A outlet, at a cost of another $300.

    A secondary issue is I don't know what amps or even the plug type is going to be for the equipment - I haven't bought it yet.
    The three Grizzly table saws I'm considering all have different plugs - 6-20, 6-15, L6-30.
    Then there's the dust collector which I haven't even started looking at yet.

    So should I get a 240V 15A circuit with a 6-15 socket, a 20A circuit with corresponding socket, a 30A circuit, all three or what?

    How do you plan the wiring and outlets in advance? Or is it something which can only be done once you've purchased the tools?
    What happens when you change tools? Do you have to rewire the shop, change outlets, etc?

    As a newcomer to the country it seems extremely user unfriendly and makes things far more complicated than they need to be.

    I'm almost at the point where I'm just going to call it quits and contract out the jobs I want doing in the house rather than do them myself.
    Last edited by Brogan; 04-12-2017 at 12:26 AM.

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    Re: Workshop wiring

    After much Googling, this is what I was planning to do with the single 240V outlet - the far right outlet in the image.



    https://www.walmart.com/ip/Tripp-Lit...itter/23140215
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    Re: Workshop wiring

    I am not electrical expert but I think you can make your own splitter for a whole lot less then $82.00.
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    Scott

    "Ability is what you are capable of doing. Motivation determines what you do. Attitude determines how well you do it."
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    Re: Workshop wiring

    That's what I was planning to do originally but based on everything I've read (and been told here in another thread), it's not permitted as the breaker will be 40A and the receptacles on the splitter will be 20A/30A.

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    Re: Workshop wiring

    You can split a 20A branch circuit into many 15A or 20A circuits since the breaker will adequately protect all the wiring and receptacles. A 20A receptacle on a 40A breaker allows up to 40A to flow through the 20A receptacle. That is not permitted.

    The splitter on the far right splits an existing 20A receptacle into Qty=2 20A receptacles.

    Note that most 15A receptacles are rated for 20A, so you can put most 15A receptacles on a 20A breaker.


    Having the builder pull a single cable for a 60A subpanel should have you setup for all your future needs. It will likely be cheaper than having them run a bunch of separate branch circuits and gives you future flexibility.

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    Re: Workshop wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeremy Scuteri View Post
    Having the builder pull a single cable for a 60A subpanel should have you setup for all your future needs. It will likely be cheaper than having them run a bunch of separate branch circuits and gives you future flexibility.
    I asked for a quote last night - waiting to hear back from them.

    I figured a surface mounted 100A sub panel would be the best option - that would provide more than enough capacity for multiple 240V and 120V outlets and make it easy to run surface mounted conduit.

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    Re: Workshop wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by Brogan View Post
    I asked for a quote last night - waiting to hear back from them.

    I figured a surface mounted 100A sub panel would be the best option - that would provide more than enough capacity for multiple 240V and 120V outlets and make it easy to run surface mounted conduit.
    I went with a 100A sub panel. From that I ran three 220v circuits and four 110v circuits. My 110v are all 20amp. My 220v are all 40 amp. Since I did my own wiring, well my BIL did most of it, I used #10 wire throughout.
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    Re: Workshop wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by Brogan View Post
    I figured a surface mounted 100A sub panel would be the best option - that would provide more than enough capacity for multiple 240V and 120V outlets and make it easy to run surface mounted conduit.




    If that ends up being crazy expensive, you might ask him the cost for a 60A subpanel and see if that is more reasonable.

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    Re: Workshop wiring

    Thanks guys - I appreciate the help and input.

    I'll follow up once I have the quote from the builder.

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    Re: Workshop wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeremy Scuteri View Post



    If that ends up being crazy expensive, you might ask him the cost for a 60A subpanel and see if that is more reasonable.
    If the builder is gouging, just hire your own sub after they are gone. A decent electrician and drywaller would be far less than the prices I'm seeing from you. I have pretty much the same setup as Scott, it is more than I'll ever need in the current shop space.

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    Re: Workshop wiring

    Agree with above comments about running a 60A subpanel. I can imagine no situation where you would need 100A... two table saws running + a dust collector would put you at ~50A. Here's a good article to help you estimate your maximum loads. http://www.woodmagazine.com/woodwork...orkshop-wiring

    Regarding the splitter, 1) you can make a 40A splitter as said above, 2) if you know your tools will draw <20A each, then you can just make a splitter with 20A parts. It won't be up to code, but it's just a non-permanent plug that you can remove whenever you like, and will never be subject to inspection.

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    Re: Workshop wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by Lowlander View Post
    A decent electrician and drywaller would be far less than the prices I'm seeing from you.
    I assumed that would be the case also, so asked for a few quotes.

    The price for 1 x 240V and 1 x 120V surface mounted was $425-$500 and that was without pulling a permit (which costs $75) and they said the price would go up because of it due to the extra time they would have to spend on site, etc.

    Which ironically makes the builder's quote cheaper.

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    Re: Workshop wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by marinosr View Post
    Agree with above comments about running a 60A subpanel. I can imagine no situation where you would need 100A.
    That's a good point - the simultaneous load would be well below 100A so yes, I could get away with a 60A panel.


    Quote Originally Posted by marinosr View Post
    It won't be up to code, but it's just a non-permanent plug that you can remove whenever you like, and will never be subject to inspection.
    That's what I was planning to do but perhaps the sub panel is the better option.

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    Re: Workshop wiring

    I went with a 100 amp box because of the flexibility it provides. If you add a HVAC system it adds up. Also some GFI's were required.

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    Re: Workshop wiring

    Quote Originally Posted by Brogan View Post
    I assumed that would be the case also, so asked for a few quotes.

    The price for 1 x 240V and 1 x 120V surface mounted was $425-$500 and that was without pulling a permit (which costs $75) and they said the price would go up because of it due to the extra time they would have to spend on site, etc.

    Which ironically makes the builder's quote cheaper.
    Good grief! That's expensive.
    I would have the builder finish. Pull a permit if needed. Then install the sub breaker, conduit lines, electrical boxes and wires where you want them. Find a decent electrician and have them hook everything up.

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