WTB beginner lathe tool set

Stackwoodworks

Andrew
User
Hi all,

I’ve got an old delta lathe that I plan on using primary for chair parts. It came with some old carbon steel tooling and I was looking to upgrade to HSS. Wondering if anyone has a beginner set that they’ve upgraded from that they would want to sell?

I’m primarily looking for a roughing gouge, detail gouge, parting tool, and skew.

Let me know if you’ve got something you want to part with or can point me in the right direction for a good beginner set.

Thanks,
Andrew
 

Hmerkle

Board of Directors, Development Director
Hank
Corporate Member
Let me look,
I may have some Older (budget friendly) Robert Sorby chisels, you might have to clean some rust off them... likely no roughing gouge...
 

NOTW

Notw
Senior User
I'm sure Chris can help you out but if not I've used this set and have no real complaints
 

chris_goris

Chris
Senior User
I'm sure Chris can help you out but if not I've used this set and have no real complaints
that looks like a fairly decent set for the money, anybody know anything about these?
 

NOTW

Notw
Senior User
I have them and used them for several years, use these and a homemade set of carbide turning tools. Keep in mind Andrew the chisels are only half of the battle you will also need a way to sharpen them. I use an 8" slow speed grinder and wolverine style jig for sharpening.
 

HITCH-

Hitch
User
I started with some of the Benjamin's Best lathe tools as well and can't complain. Some folks claim that they are not HSS. While they might not be the same quality of steel as some of the renowned brands, they have worked well for me and were cost effective.
I would probably opt for the 8 piece set.

 

charlessenf

Charles
Senior User
I've been using a set I bought to match teh HFT Lathe I was gifted one December morning long ago. Haven't sharpen them yet - don't know how - but don't make chair legs or furniture either.
I suspect learning how to sharpen these tools would go a long way toward making them useful to a real craftsman. Or, learning which one to use first and so on.
It seems to me that the steel won't break a project, and the length and heft of the tool (the feel of it) are more important in the hands of an experienced wood turner.

NOTE:
Through SUN 9/25 they have a 10% Off coupon #12894110 that applies toward "Any Item* over $50;" a 15% Off Coupon 12891953 applicable to any item 20-50 dollars, and a 30% Off Coupon 12882422 applicable towards any item retailing for $20 or less. Gives one a pretty clear idea of where their markup points lie.

It's been a while since I've see one of those 'good old' 20% Off coupons - or Free Flashlights and such.

If folks come across them, post teh info and Coupon Number here 'cause everyone don't see everything what happens all the time.
 
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SabertoothBunny

SabertoothBunny
User
Honestly, the starter set from Harbor Freight is perfect for this. You will get a feel for how the tools work, it has the basic starter ones to learn with and making mistakes while sharpening them won't be as frustrating due to the reasonable price. Grab the 20% coupon and these are very much worth learning with. I started with this set of tools.

 

charlessenf

Charles
Senior User
I started with some of the Benjamin's Best lathe tools as well and can't complain. Some folks claim that they are not HSS. While they might not be the same quality of steel as some of the renowned brands, they have worked well for me and were cost effective.
I would probably opt for the 8 piece set.

These look like copies of the set I got from HFT - down to teh cheap wooden box. Do you think there is a plant in China that makes the same set but prints different names on the tools and boxes? Nah.
 

cyclopentadiene

Update your profile with your name
User
Try. https://thompsonlathetools.com/

They are some of the best out there and are only marginally more expensive than the low cost ones mentioned in the thread. You can purchase 1 handle and several tools. As you progress you can then turn your own handles.
Cheap tools do not hold an edge and will just frustrate you. You will then throw more good money after bad by replacing the cheap tools.
 

iclark

Ivan
User
The Benjamin Best set includes an oval skew. The Harbor Freight set has 2 traditional skews. The traditional (rectangular cross-section) skews are a much better tool.

If you are going to start with a set, the HFT is a better chance and it does not hurt as much while you are learning to sharpen and finding out whether turning is something that you want to pursue.

Once you get some practice/experience, then the tools that Doug Thompson makes are highly recommended. The hard part is deciding which of the grinds to get. The alternative source for the skews would be the Lacer signature tools. I got mine from Alan when he was here for a short course.

There are a lot of AAW clubs around the country. They usually offer demos and mentoring. The benefit of that can not be overstated.
 

Stackwoodworks

Andrew
User
I have them and used them for several years, use these and a homemade set of carbide turning tools. Keep in mind Andrew the chisels are only half of the battle you will also need a way to sharpen them. I use an 8" slow speed grinder and wolverine style jig for sharpening.
The Benjamin’s best were the ones I was looking at if I was buying new, so it’s nice to see those recommended here. I’ve got a slow speed grinder and Wolverine jig that I found a good price on used a while back so I feel good in that department.
 

Jim Wallace

jimwallacewoodturning.com
Jim
Corporate Member
I agree with Cyclo that better tools will serve you in the long run. I love my Thompson Tools, but for economy with quality I would look at Crown tools at Hartville Tool. Hartville seems to have one of the best selections at lowest price and free shipping to boot. Crown tools are available in a variety of steel choices. They are accurately ground.
 

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