Window Rot Repair UPDATE

David Turner

David
Corporate Member
DQ
I have a mess on my front window. It has numerous places of dry/wet rot. I've consulted two rot repair local "experts" and both recommend replacing the entire window trim with P.V.C. Have not received their quotes yet but I'm sure it is going to be expensive. There is evidence of previous repairs with wood that did not hold up. It is kind of hard to see the rot in the upper arced sections but all 6 have some amount of rot and the paint is all that is holding it together.

Anybody have experience with these type of repairs? Any suggestions or recommendations?

David Turner
North Raleigh



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Hmerkle

Board of Directors, Secretary
Hank
Corporate Member
DQ
Watching David, because I have the same problem with some windows AND wood n the front porch - going to tear into the front porch next weekend...
 
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zdorsch

Zach
Senior User
DQ
I’m wondering how they flashed the head casing in those windows. Is there any metal above the window trim or was it just caulked?

It seems like water is getting behind at the top of the window and running down to where the arches meet (the middle window to right window looks like the paint is compromised?).

Liquid flashing may be a good option when repairing. I’m not familiar with flashing rounded windows like that, but I have also put a metal drip edge extending past the window and several inches up from the window—I’m not sure how that would work in the case of those windows. I wonder if lead or copper and then soldered would be a good idea.

Edit: Did a brief search and found this:


Liquid flashing on the wall, window flange and then over the flange extending to the wall. Followed by lead or copper soldered where it meets the window arches.

I will also guess your sheathing will look similar to what is pictured in the link—but hopefully not!
 

David Turner

David
Corporate Member
DQ
I have now had time to drive around the Bedford area and have found 4 other Charleston style houses like mine with the triple round top windows. One has had the complete PVC update the two others are like mine and in a sad state of repairs. It is hard to see if the flashing goes up and under the siding or not. One of the "experts" told me they did not make a round top arched flashing!?

David
 

Graywolf

Richard
Corporate Member
DQ
I've seen that flashing done, it's much like step flashing on a chimney and not the greatest thing in the world for long term protection. That being said there are some modern products and membranes available on the market today that can do the job. For more info on that topic I would suggest Fine Home Building and or This Old House magazines/web sites. I agree with Zach water is getting behind the window casing and getting trapped. With nowhere to go it's destroying the wood.
 

Henry W

HenryW
Senior User
DQ
No direct experience with arch top windows, but if you are getting water in behind the siding, then the studs themselves are prone to rot (depends on how well the house wrap was done - or not). I have seen rotted studs - and the entire wall needed to be replaced. When the trim comes off, be certain to check the structure itself, as much as is possible.
 

Oka

New User
Oka
I have dealt with this hundreds of times. Bottom line, you have remove the dryrot 1st. So, Remove the window trim, Then, reframe the affected area, then flash use bituthene or the liquid applied material depending what you prefer. I always use roll lead for curved windows. IT is kinda expensive but........ no leaks. Always wear gloves. THe caulking and bituthene, Get the urethane version, and replace the finish material material and caulk with Sika or Sonneborne or equal. The low modulus version is like butyl caulk as it does not dry hard. Then you can paint. One of things on the east coast is the lack of Redwood trim and Cedar trim wood that is not too expensive. Both are superior to Dry rot resistance. Cedar is actually better. If you do not use cedar or redwood, then cypress and to a lesser degree Doug fir that has be borate treated.
Not a big fan of the plastic, though I have used it quite a bit does not look like real wood no matter what others say..... at least to me. But it does look ok. If you are near an edge with the plastic make sure you pre drill for the fasteners or it can shatter a piece of it off. It is kinda brittle near the edge depending on the brand. If you have to make a radius, you need to heat it, Be careful when heating over heating will make it lose its texture. If you want more info just pm and glad the help.
 

danmart77

Dan
Corporate Member
DQ
I think you have to pull down the window trim entirely and evaluate the amount of damage behind the trim. It seems like the top of the windows were not flashed correctly?

Its a hard to see example below David but here is the flashing I did above the doors and windows with copper. Without going into the "should have stuff" you have some repairs that need to be addressed.
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JimD

Jim
Senior User
DQ
If you can find it dry enough pressure treated wood takes paint well and does not rot. It could be an option to remake the trim.

I like Siroflex Duo-Sil caulk. You can order it from Amazon or there are dealers who have it, a shingle distributor near me carries it. It is urethane so it stays flexible and can be painted. It comes in a range of colors but I have always used the white. It shrinks a lot less than normal painters caulk.

I agree with the others about flashing. Flexible window tape would at least help but metal flashing would hold up better. Can you get behind the siding?
 

David Turner

David
Corporate Member
DQ
Tried to get 3 quotes but one contractor did not reply. The 2 that did both recommended tear off and replacement of all trim with PVC. Not sure yet about damage to the building walls/structure. Will have to make that determination after removal of the wood trim. Prices ranged from $1085 to $1700. Lowest cost bidder has done another window in the addition just like miine and so has experience. They are to start tomorrow 6/18/19. More information in the future.

David
 

danmart77

Dan
Corporate Member
DQ
The top of the arch needs to be flashed with lead tape as Oka stated earlier for the best results. Tape can do the job but if you are going to the trouble of pulling the entire facade down, get the best materials in place.

Zach mentioned a contractor up in Mass. He is well informed but I would add to his inputs.

186474

186475

I have seen this method more than any other around windows. The course at the bottom of the window should flash out above the clapboard to get the water out from behind the siding.

Additionally, when I did Hardie and Nichiha cement siding I always had 50 to 60 pieces of cut flashing to place behind the joints of the siding where they butt together. Its just better and if one of the crew nails a piece of siding and forgets to put the flashing down, he can slide in the aluminum flashing piece and not tear up the end of the 12' siding piece. By the way that nail is closer to the edge than I like.
 

zdorsch

Zach
Senior User
DQ
Make absolutely certain they are using some type of solid flashing like Dan mentioned—lead/copper/stainless something that an be brazed or welded solid.

While rigid flashing is not the cheapest, tape will degrade as will caulking and spending that money on pvc is worthless if the water can still get behind the trim. (I like using a rain screen as well, and am doing so on my own home with fiber cement, but that will only add to the cost).
 

Cuthriell

New User
Cuthriell
I am currently repairing window frame rot and have been using TotalBoat Thixo Fast Cure 2:1 Epoxy System. We have repaired a lot of damaged wood over the last few years with this. I never use the mixing nozzles. Just squirt out enough and mix by hand. We use Wood Hardener first, after the worst wood is removed. I have also used Bondo Home Solutions Wood filler to build up some areas but don,t have any run time on it.

Mike


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David Turner

David
Corporate Member
DQ
After 42 years in the Industrial Construction business, I'm not sure any contractor can make me totally happy but at 76 I don't do ladders real well so I'm going to have to rely on others. They did a reasonably good job just not exactly like I would have done, but I'm happy. It is all PVC now and it was flashed behind the siding. Damage was not as extensive as I thought but I have a clear mind about the longevity of the window now. See Pictures below

David Turner
 

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