Removing decades old grease

Chris C

Chris
Senior User
The gears on the Sheldon lathe are caked with nasty semi-dried grease. Anything I can soak them in to remove it.... I'd rather not default to a wire brush unless I have to.
 

Gofor

Mark
Corporate Member
Gasoline, diesel fuel, kerosene, naptha (all flammable or combustible). Krud kutter (non flammable and most espensive). For tight areas, brake cleaner sprayed in. If using gas , kerosene, etc, rinsing afterwards with DNA will help get rid of the odor. Mineral spirits will probably work also, but the fuels will most likely be quicker and more efficient.
 

Oka

Oka
Corporate Member
Kerosene and diesel 1st use a plastic scraper to get the majority off then like others said, you could use variety of cleaners ans slowly take it down to metal.

There is another way that would make it mostly one day deal. But, not sure you can rent the machine.

CO2 blasting (dry ice), we used this on wiring damaged from the Volcano eruption on the Big Island here in Hawaii.
Not sure how expensive it is but Wow, it works and zero damage.

Basically it is like sand blasting but with frozen carbon dioxide (Dry Ice) it worked amazingly. Good luck

Dry Ice Blasting Demo

Dry Ice Blasting
 
Last edited:

Gofor

Mark
Corporate Member
Another alternative if you have a small cabinet blaster is to use plastic media instead of sand. It will remove paint, debris, etc without changing any dimensional aspects of the part, and won't etch the metal. Might not work well at removing heavy corrosion. Its a lot less expensive than the dry-ice method. For delicate parts you can use baking soda.
 

Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
The simplest and easiest method is kerosine. It's slightly less flammable than gasoline.
 

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