Reasonably Priced Non Ethanol Fuel

junquecol

Bruce
User
Most places charge about a buck a gallon more for ethanol free fuel, and it's usually mid grade. The Exon station on Williams Street (NC 55) in Apex near the rail road underpass charges (as of Thursday) $2.89 a gallon for ethanol free fuel, which is only $0.30 a gallon more than their regular grade of fuel. Don't know if it's regular or mid grade, but based upon price I would assume it's regular, which is what most small engines require.
 

Jeff

New User
Jeff
In North Durham Exxon today.
grade$/gallondifference/gallon
no ETHANOL, grade 903.09
Premium 892.820.27
Regular 872.520.57
 
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Brantnative

Jeff
Corporate Member
I always wondered why ethanol free gas was 40 cents cheaper in Lincolnton ($2.89) than in Denver ($3.29). They're only 15 miles apart. I'll have to go and check the grades at each location.
 

Hmerkle

Board of Directors, Vice President
Hank
Corporate Member
It IS important.
Especially in small gas engines (lawnmower, pressure washer, generator, weed eater, etc.)
newer ones are being designed to work with the ethanol, but most will fail over time (carburetor issues)if you put ethanol fuel in them
 

Jeff

New User
Jeff
It IS important.
Especially in small gas engines (lawnmower, pressure washer, generator, weed eater, etc.)
newer ones are being designed to work with the ethanol, but most will fail over time (carburetor issues)if you put ethanol fuel in them
Why do they fail over time with ethanol in the gas? I've had mixed results with my small equipment.
 

Hmerkle

Board of Directors, Vice President
Hank
Corporate Member
The ethanol separates from the gas.
1. it can attack fuel lines
2. it can attack aluminum (corroding)
3. if can create a "gummy"mass in the fuel bowl or filters and when that gets in the jet it requires a carburator job.

you are VERY correct that you will have mixed results. this is not a 100% thing

If you choose to use ethanol, the best thing you can do is NOT leave it in the engine for long periods of time (over winter for lawn equipment, in a generator between testing - EMPTY the fuel!)
 

Jeff

New User
Jeff
The ethanol separates from the gas.
1. it can attack fuel lines
2. it can attack aluminum (corroding)
3. if can create a "gummy"mass in the fuel bowl or filters and when that gets in the jet it requires a carburator job.
A good idea to remove the fuel at the end of the season and run the equipment dry.
The ethanol isn't separated from the gas when you get it from the pump. I suspect that the gas absorbs moisture (water) from the air over time and that ethanol/water mix is then insoluble in the gas so it settles to the bottom.

1. it can attack fuel lines
So the synthetic fuel lines aren't ethanol resistant?
2. it can attack aluminum (corroding)
Aluminum where? The fuel tank or combustion chamber?
3. if can create a "gummy"mass in the fuel bowl or filters and when that gets in the jet it requires a carburator job.
I've seen that in my weed eater and leaf blower requiring a new carburetor but not in my lawnmowers or chainsaw. The generator has had some gummy varnish in the float bowl that caused the float to stick. Easily cleaned by removing the bowl and using some carb cleaner.
 

Hmerkle

Board of Directors, Vice President
Hank
Corporate Member
" I suspect that the gas absorbs moisture (water) from the air over time and that ethanol/water mix is then insoluble in the gas so it settles to the bottom."
Jeff, I think that is true - I am not sure of the chemistry, but if you open an old float bowl, you can see the separation, unless it has already turned into a gel!
1. it can attack fuel lines
So the synthetic fuel lines aren't ethanol resistant?
While it is not logical - I have seen the damage - typically "tygon" style tubing seems to breakdown and needs to be replaced.
2. it can attack aluminum (corroding)
Aluminum where? The fuel tank or combustion chamber?
The fuel bowl and the carburetor itself - specifically the ports, when they are corroded, it is a "throw it away and buy a new carb" day!
3. if can create a "gummy"mass in the fuel bowl or filters and when that gets in the jet it requires a carburator job.
I've seen that in my weed eater and leaf blower requiring a new carburetor but not in my lawnmowers or chainsaw. The generator has had some gummy varnish in the float bowl that caused the float to stick. Easily cleaned by removing the bowl and using some carb cleaner.
You might have caught that soon enough - I would suggest getting a "mechanic in a bottle" (FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS!!! or look on You Tube - get ALL the gas out, get the MIB into the carb however you can) to get a "deeper" cleaning of the fuel paths to eliminate future problems. Because if the float was stuck, then the next step is that crap is going to get into the jet and again it is "New Carburetor day!" THE last thing you want is a problem with the generator when you need it...
 

cpw

New User
Charles
The Quality Plus where we usually fuel up has ethanol free premium currently at $3.25/gal. There's a mom & pop place outside of town that has ethanol free midgrade that is usually a bit cheaper, but it's so far out of my way that it is usually not worth the difference for 5 gallons.
 

junquecol

Bruce
User
The Quality Plus where we usually fuel up has ethanol free premium currently at $3.25/gal. There's a mom & pop place outside of town that has ethanol free midgrade that is usually a bit cheaper, but it's so far out of my way that it is usually not worth the difference for 5 gallons.
One place about the same distance away as the Exon has mid grade for $3.39 a gallon. Exon is on my traveled path. I run alcohol free in small engines EXCEPT generators. In generators, because of volume used, it makes sense to run ethanol fuel. After each use, fuel is shut off and carburetor is run dry. Every three months, tank is drained and replaced with fresh fuel. All my fuel has Staron added to it at time of filling the cans.
 

Mike Wilkins

Mike
Senior User
I had to take my pressure washer back to the dealer to have the carb cleaned due to leaving regular gas in the tank/carb over the winter. Since then I have begun to use the 4-stroke fuel available from Lowes and outdoor power equipment dealers in the gallon cans. This contains a fuel stabilizer, which is great for seldom used machines like pressure washers. I also use the available pre-mixed fuel in my weed eater and blower, as it also contains a fuel stabilizer. After winter storage, they start up like you used the machine yesterday.
 

Jeff

New User
Jeff
to use the 4-stroke fuel available from Lowes and outdoor power equipment dealers in the gallon cans. This contains a fuel stabilizer, which is great for seldom used machines like pressure washers.
Something like this product?

 

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