Outreach Volunteers Needed - King Cub Scouts

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
Webelos/AOL Elective Adventure: Build It
Complete the following requirements.
  1. Learn about some basic tools and the proper use of each tool. Learn about and understand the need for safety when you work with tools.
  2. With the guidance of your Webelos den leader, parent, or guardian, select a carpentry project and build it.
  3. List the tools that you use safely as you build your project; create a list of materials needed to build your project. Put a checkmark next to the tools on your list that you used for the first time.
  4. Learn about a construction career. With your Webelos den leader, parent, or guardian, visit a construction site, and interview someone working in a construction career.
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
The Official BSA Whittling Chip
for Bear Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts
is a Wallet Card (No. 34223A) and/or Patch (08598)
(shown above)

While the Insignia Guide states that this emblem is not for uniform wear, the Whittling Chip patch is considered a "Temporary Patch"
and, if worn, should be worn centered on the RIGHT Pocket of the Cub Scout or Webelos Scout Uniform Shirt (NOT on a pocket flap),
or on a patch vest, blanket or outer wear. Scouts who earned it while in Cub Scouts may also wear it on the BACK of a merit badge sash.
It should NOT be sewn on a pocket flap
Requirements:
  1. Know the safety rules for handling a knife.
  2. Show that you know how to take care of and use a pocketknife.
  3. Make a carving with a pocketknife.* Work with your den leader or other adult when doing this.
  4. Read, understand and promise to abide by the "Knives Are Not Toys" guidelines.
  5. Read, understand and promise to abide by the "Pocketknife Pledge."
*One of the items carved for requirement 3 of the "Bear Claws" adventure
may be used to fulfill Whittling Chip requirement 3.
The Pocketknife Pledge:
In return for the privilege of carrying a pocketknife to designated Cub Scout functions, I agree to the following:
  • I will treat my pocketknife with the respect due a useful tool.
  • I will always close my pocketknife and put it away when not in use.
  • I will not use my pocketknife when it might injure someone near me.
  • I promise never to throw my pocketknife for any reason.
  • I will use my pocketknife in a safe manner at all times.
Knives Are Not Toys Guidelines
  • Close the blade with the palm of your hand.
  • Never use a knife on something that will dull or break it.
  • Be Careful that you do not cut yourself or any person nearby.
  • Never use a knife to strip the bark from a tree.
  • Do not carve your initials into anything that does not belong to you.
Knife Safety Rules
  • A knife is a tool, not a toy
  • Know how to sharpen a knife.
    A sharp knife is safer than a dull knife because it is less likely to slip and cut you.
  • Keep the blade clean.
  • Never carry an open pocketknife
  • When you are not using your knife, close it and put it away.
  • When you are using the cutting blade, do not try to make big shavings or chips. Eay does it.
  • Make a safety circle. Before you pick up your knife to use it, stretch your arm out and turn in a circle.
    If you cannot touch anyone or anything else, it is safe to use your knife.
    While using your knife, be sure to watch in case someone walks toward you and gets too close.
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
Cub Scouts are not allowed to use power tools. Hand tools would be great things to bring and demonstrate, let them use, learn the names and how to sharpen. Make a small project with hand tools. Cut, drill, nail, apply a finish. Safety, personal protection, eyewear, dust mask, etc.

A handsaw miter box would be great for them to learn.

The younger kids (Bobcat and Tiger) are very limited in what they are allowed to do. Assembly of a small project and talking about safety and how trees are made into wood may be the extent of what most clubs will ever do.

Bears and Webelos can do slightly more advanced projects. Before handling sharp tools they must have their toting chip, means they have learned to handle a pocket knife and can begin to use cutting tools. Safety is a huge part of all these badges.

Scouting is not what it was when we were young, very much watered down.

We have a great opportunity to help these kids learn things they will not see any where else.
 

Berta

Berta
Corporate Member
So, I believe (hope) we still have a hand saw, hammer and drill on the trailer. What other hand tools should we bring for this? A plane? I am not a hand tool expert. Tool box should be one of the two builds for sure. We can have the parts pre cut. They should probably nail them together. We will need wood glue. I suggest popular. Can you teach whittling? Your thoughts?
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
I also have several Hand crank drills, brace and bit sets, hand planes, yankee drills, probably anything else...
 

Barry W

Co-Director of Outreach
Barry
Corporate Member
I would like to volunteerI have an old miter box but am
Tonika, Consider yourself volunteered :) It would probably be best for us to have a planning/work session possibly after the Charlotte outreach event. If agreeable with those who want to attend, we can use my shop. It would be very good for those with Scout experience to be involved. Berta, what is the budget for supplies and materials?

I have an old miter box but am not sure if I an find the saw.
 

Berta

Berta
Corporate Member
Well, I am hoping to get the needed hand tools loaned from whoever is willing.
I am sure I can buy the wood and incidentals. What do we need needs to be determined first.
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
We had a very productive meeting tonight. They like the camp chair idea and think all the kids will like it and they will be useful when camping. These are extreme examples just showing that they can be decorated in many ways. The basic idea is very simple, just one board cut in half. One piece becomes the seat and one piece becomes the back. The back needs a through mortise, the seat needs a long tenon. That’s it decorate with paint, carving, drill holes, cut out designs, unlimited possibilities.

They are willing to buy the wood.

Since these are kids I thought 1x10 should be strong enough. Maybe some larger/older kids will want 2x12. Soft pine is light and easy to work.

They have picnic tables under a shelter that can serve as work benches. They would like to have 28 kids make these. I think we can do 10. Maybe if we have more volunteers to help?
 

Barry W

Co-Director of Outreach
Barry
Corporate Member
Okay, now that we decided at tonight's meeting what we are going to help the young woodworkers build, it's time for volunteer sign-up. We had a great Outreach event last weekend in Charlotte and this will be even more rewarding because we are working with kids. Some children have never seen tools, let alone worked with them to build something. This is the official Sign-Up List and I would like to fill this table quickly. Thanks.

King Cub Scouts Outreach Event
Tonika
Dirk
Mike Davis
Barry
Raymond
Neal
 
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bowman

Board of Directors, Events Director
Neal
Staff member
Corporate Member
Cool idea Mike. Put me down Barry.
 

Phil S

Board of Directors, President
Phil Soper
Staff member
Corporate Member
The only hand tool left on the trailer that we saw was a flush trim saw.
Flush trim saw was the only saw on the trailer. The only hand tools removed where a couple of chisel sets and the carving sets. I seem to remember there were a few egg beater style drills and at least one hammer
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
I have hand saws, brace and bits, egg beaters, chisels, mallets. At least 4 of each, can set up and sharpen a few more saws. Could use more rip saws, I only have two.

The bigger news is this ;
They are interested in a train the trainer session or sessions to get more of their volunteers ready to teach woodworking to the kids. There are thousands of Scouts (boys and girls) in NC and hundreds of Scouting volunteers. If we can train dozens they can train more and many more kids can be introduced to woodworking.

The kids are allowed to use hand tools, no power tools. They would also like to have a tool list and sources to buy hand tools. I don’t expect this to go over the top but I think any small spark is worth the effort.
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
Maybe we can them build a “workshop-in-a-box” with just the tools need for simple projects, at least 5 of each tool? That could be kept at a central location and checked out for different troops to use for a week or two at a time.
 

Raymond

Raymond
Corporate Member
I will bring my Japanese style saws (just to have some extras on hand). Are there any other hand tools that might be needed?

I will also bring my chisel roll and a standard rip saw and standard cross cut saw.
 
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