Making Colonial Shutters

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mgoins

New User
Marvin
Or, stated another way, “What to do with the molding, scraps, and 3 1x8 old growth pine boards left over from paneling our Reading Room? We’ve wanted Colonial type shutters for our home for several years, but, their considerable expense was prohibitive. But, we have a shop now! And, the will to try it.

This thread will document the quest to build a set of Colonial Shutters for the window that matches the paneling in our Reading Room. By the end of the quest, we’ll see if the will survives to continue on through the rest of the house.

Below are a couple pictures of the Reading Room. Here’s a link to the entire story of the Paneling Project: http://ncwoodworker.net/forums/showthread.php?t=28394

West Wall:
IMG_0301.jpg


South Wall:
IMG_0335.jpg


Here’s what we’re shooting for. I snatched this vintage example from the curb a few months ago.
IMG_1774.jpg


Louvers will be: 1 ¼” x 5 5/8”. Looked at using the Woodline Shutter Set, but they’re Out of Stock for 2-3 weeks, and I have 2 weeks of vacation. Decided to see what I do with what I have.

Here’s a pic of the stock pile to be used. A tremendous amount of shorts, and cut-offs from the paneling project. Should be just enough...
IMG_1726.jpg


Step 1 – Resaw to split the stock in half, 21/64”.
IMG_1772.jpg


Step 1 – Resaw Complete
IMG_1773.jpg


Step 2 – Plane to 5/16” thick
IMG_1839.jpg


Step 3 – Form Louvers on table saw. Blade is tilted to 5 degrees.
IMG_1840.jpg


Step 4 – Roundover completed.
IMG_1843.jpg


Started the project on 12/20/2010 with machine setup. 4 machines were tuned up, jigs made, and set up for producing the louvers. Plus, installation and setup of the mortise attachment on the drill press, and Tenoning Jig on the table saw for production of the rails and stiles.

At this point, the frames & stiles are rough cut, and all louvers formed.

Next steps:
- Jig for drilling louvers for shutter pins.
- Adjustment Rod
- Jig for attachment of louvers to adjustment rod

Thanks for playing along.
 

junquecol

Bruce
User
Instead of drilling for pins, why not make pins on each shutter leaf? Make a jig, and using a plug cutter, cut pin out. Then using TS, or BS remove the waste just like you do for a tennon. You might have to do some clean up with a utility knife.
 

mgoins

New User
Marvin
Instead of drilling for pins, why not make pins on each shutter leaf? Make a jig, and using a plug cutter, cut pin out. Then using TS, or BS remove the waste just like you do for a tennon. You might have to do some clean up with a utility knife.

Have never used a plug cutter. Do you think a plug cutter would cut smoothly enough to not blow out, I'd prefer to go all wood, if we could figure out how to do it.
 

mgoins

New User
Marvin
12/27/2010 – Jig Day

Out in the shop by 7am, first order of business was roughing out the adjustment rods, using the same setup as the louvers, just without the angle cuts. The scrap pile is now down next to nothing, with the bin looking closer to toothpicks & sawdust. Every stationary tool and small clamp in the shop has been put to use.

Adjustment Rods
IMG_1844.jpg


Router Table Setup. 3/16” roundover bit. Fingerboards are made from reclaimed door frame.
IMG_1845.jpg


Next up were jigs. Drill press is a 1953 Craftsman 15” with an Atlas W68 Universal Vise – almost sold the Vise a year or so ago – guys on OWWM made me aware of what I had – glad I held onto it.

· Stile Drilling Jig - Need a jig to control drilling evenly spaced holes along the length of the stile. 1” apart. Example shows using 2 1/8” drill bits, one in the drill & one in the ‘spacer hole’.

· Louver Drilling Jig – is setup to drill a 9/64” hole in the meatiest part of the louver to accept the shutter pin.

Stile Drilling Jig:
IMG_1846.jpg


Stile Drilling Jig – up-close
IMG_1847.jpg


Louver Drilling Jig
IMG_1848.jpg



Looking into adjustment rod installation, I’ve seen a couple options. Let me know your thoughts on this.
1) Staples. At this point, I don’t have a stapler, or air compressor, and though I know I should use this opportunity to add tools to the crib, I’m thinking of going a different route. Also, since we’re using old growth pine with knots, and relatively thin stock, I’m nervous of hitting a knot on the adjustment rods, blowing out, and ruining the project.
2) Screw eyes. I’ve seen a couple people online use 1/8” brass screw eyes & they seem a step up from staples.
 

Sealeveler

Tony
Corporate Member
Thanks for the play x play.Like your jigs too.Drill press is a winner,especially with the vise.
Tony
 

mgoins

New User
Marvin
12/28/2010 – Man, is it cold outside… 9 degrees here in East Tennessee. Most of the snow from the weekend is still on the ground. Hate to say it, but, I didn’t jump up excited to get hit with the shock of the cold to warm up the shop this morning. Went out about 8:30a.

Noticed yesterday that the Stile Drilling Jig was off slightly, due to the X-Y table on the vise not being aligned properly with the bit. Spent quite a bit of time this morning, working on alignment. After quite a while of sighting by eye, and continually being off like before. Came up with using the drill bit to align the jig, lower the drill press all the way & run the face of the jig across it, but it too flimsy and would bend. So, I remember I had an alignment pin from replaced it with the mortise attachment alignment pin, and it worked like a champ.

Here’s a pic of alignment pin – basically a large piece of drill stock.
IMG_1849.jpg


The finished product on a piece of scrap.
IMG_1850.jpg


At this point, I think I’m done for a little while. Need to order a 3/16”D edge beading bit, the shutter pins, & screw eyes. ‘Til later…
 

Glennbear

Moderator
Glenn
Your reading room is fantastic looking Marvin, thank you for keeping us informed on your shutter project. Although I have never made a set, I like the idea of the screw eyes vs staples also. :wsmile:
 

mgoins

New User
Marvin
This week saw the arrival of a few parts required for the project, just in time for the weekend.
- a 3/16"D Beading Bit from MLCS
- Qty. 400 #217 1/8" brass screw eyes from Woodcrafter.com. Great prices - $1.60/100.
- shutter pin samples. Have found a couple options to pick up shutter pins in bulk. E&T Fasteners ($15 minimum), and Outwater Plastics ($25 minimum). Hopefully, once pricing is known from E&T, I can get an order placed with of them on Monday & have them by next weekend.

Made a little progress today...

Flipped the Stile Drilling Jig around & added another jig to drill the holes in the louvers for the Brass Screw Eyes. 1/16" bit.
IMG_0016.jpg


Delta Tenon Jig setup to cut the tenons on the Shutter Rails. Got the Jig on clearance at Lowe's for $25 a couple years ago. This is the first time it's been used. Worked pretty well - but, wished I had one of the vintage cast iron Tenon Jigs - maybe one day...
IMG_0021.jpg


Tenons Cut ready to go.
IMG_0022.jpg


Things ought to begin coming together next weekend. Til later...
 
Last edited:

junquecol

Bruce
User
Your jig is cast iron, just not as massive as the old ones. I had a problem with mine wanting to tip, so I solved that problem.
 

mgoins

New User
Marvin
Your jig is cast iron, just not as massive as the old ones. I had a problem with mine wanting to tip, so I solved that problem.

Sorry for the confusion - meant I'd like to have one of the vintage Delta Tenon jigs. This one wants to tip too. How'd you go about fixing the tipping problem?
 

b4man

New User
Barbara
This is a fantastic thread! Thanks Marvin for the time and pix you have put into this project.


Barbara
 

mgoins

New User
Marvin
01/16/2011 - This week saw the arrival of the last parts required to complete the project - Shutter Pins. Further progress had been hampered waiting on them. They arrived just in time for the weekend.

Ordered them from Outwater Plastics. They will sell to the public in bulk, $25 minimum. Even so, quite a bit of money was saved over buying retail, and enough left over to do a few more windows.
- Qty. 1000 Shutter Pins - Part# SP-1
- Qty. 1000 Tension Control Pins - Part# SP-19 (am planning on using these every 5th louver & see how they do).

Was excited to get out in the shop today - but, there was a sense of foreboding. Considering the project is made from old growth pine scraps, and is to match existing panelling made from the same stuff, i can't down run down to H*me D*pot to pick up another board. One major mistake & it could be game over.

Drilling the stiles for the louver pins is probably the most important operation of the project, as the eye could follow inconsistencies in the pattern. Took an hour to test drill a couple of test boards, & noticed that the drillng jig was allowing the holes to 'walk' away from the witness marks drawn on the board. The 'pin' was so tight, that it was hard to tell when it was in the previous hole. Ended up marking all stiles & sighting by eye. Worked out really well.

Using the louver pin jig to drill the holes
IMG_1860.jpg


Cutting Mortises in the Stiles
IMG_1861.jpg


Louver Holes Drilled - the 'extra' holes will be covered by bottom rail - Whew!
IMG_1862.jpg


A little 'loose tenon joinery' to fix where I mortised to the wrong line... - Whew!
IMG_1863.jpg


Adjustment Rod Slot Cutting Jig
IMG_1864.jpg


Rails ready for installation
IMG_1865.jpg


Next the Miter Box was set up w/a stop block to cut test louver stock at 5 5/8". Didn't want to waste the good stuff, if there was a problem.

Next the 24 louvers were run thru the louver drilling jig to drill for the pins.
IMG_1848.jpg


The moment of truth...
IMG_1866.jpg


Am proud of the result so far. This is the most challenging woodworking project I've ever done. Every tool in the shop has been put to use & there have been times I wished there was a 3rd drill press & a 2nd router table to use.

One down, 7 more to go...
 

mgoins

New User
Marvin
Can’t believe it’s been a month since the last update… Shop time has been hard to come by lately. The snow brought out snowboarding interest in my kids, been on the slopes at Winterplace in West Virginia, or Wolf Ridge in North Carolina the last 3 weekends.

Got out in the shop early this morning to see how much progress could be made today. Got quite a bit accomplished - one more day, and we’ll be ready for a test fitting all of them. Nearly everything’s been made & is ready for assembly. The exception being the adjustment rods, they need to be cut to size & the recess made in the top rail for them to rest. Hopefully, we’ll get to that tomorrow afternoon.

Chopped what seemed like a gazillion louvers today. Actually, the project calls for nearly 200. 24 louvers per section on the bottom, totaling 96, and 23 louvers per section on the top, totaling 92.

Louvers galore… These have been drilled for pins on each end.
IMG_0002.jpg


Another view – thought this looked interesting… These have just been drilled in the center for screw eyes to attach to the adjustment rods.
IMG_0003.jpg


Stiles drilled for louvers with mortises cut, rails rabbeted.
IMG_0004.jpg



Getting there…
 

MarkE

Mark
Corporate Member
Now that this has been re-opened, please give us an update. This is a great project to watch.
 

mgoins

New User
Marvin
Now that this has been re-opened, please give us an update. This is a great project to watch.

Good evening, Mark - our posts passed in the mail. Not sure why the first page of the post, shows up on the 2nd page, though - strange.

Thanks for watching.
 

Gotcha6

Dennis
Staff member
Corporate Member
Good evening, Mark - our posts passed in the mail. Not sure why the first page of the post, shows up on the 2nd page, though - strange.

Thanks for watching.

Marvin, I don't think pagination has anything to do with a post being reopened, rather it is a function of the available memory for screen size relative to scrolling properties of the software.

At least that's the best lie I could come up with that sounded like geekspeak. :gar-La;
 

mgoins

New User
Marvin
2/26/2011 - Got out in the shop early this morning. Worked an hour here & there all day. Made a little progress. Learned to use a plunge router - have had it (P-C 890) for probably 5-6 years, but never had a reason to use it til today. Worked really well once I got used to it. Used it to cut the recesses for the adjustment rods on the top rails of each shutter section.

Adjustment rod recess jig. It's sized to cut a slot 3/8" wide x 5/8" long, using a 1/2" template collar w/a 1/4" straight bit. I don't have a vise... Thank goodness for that Atlas X-Y table vise...
IMG_0065.jpg


Rails with recesses cut.
IMG_0066.jpg


Shutter Parts sanded and ready for a little A-ssem-bl-y...
IMG_0067.jpg


We're getting there...
 

mgoins

New User
Marvin
02/27/2011 - Sunday afternoon - Cut mortises for the hinges. Added a hinge mortise template to the adjustment rod recess jig - laid it out to cut both mating surfaces at once - saves a lot of time & ensures the hinges mate up correctly.

Hinge Mortise Jig
IMG_0068.jpg


Shutter Frames Assembled
IMG_0069.jpg


First real one - assembled - 7 more to go.
IMG_0070.jpg
 
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