Looking for a froe

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Phil S

Board of Directors, President
Phil Soper
Staff member
Corporate Member
Traditional Woodworker has several
 

StephenK

New User
Stephen
Lie Neilsen and Drew Lansger at Country Workshop sells them, as well. Ed Lebetkin sold most of his to Hollywood for the move The Revenant. He was in short supply a couple of weeks ago.
 

danmart77

Dan
Corporate Member
Anybody know of where I could buy a froe, new or used. I'm in the Jacksonville area.
If there is a blacksmith in the area, you can get one made just the way you want it. Stick a straight grain piece of oak or hickory in the eye hole and go to work. This is a very simple tool but you need to find one that is the size you need for the work you are doing.

I made a few from bar stock and car leaf springs. The best part of the experience was finding I had froes that were just too big. For making windsor chair parts and 2000 shingle shakes for a restoration, the small 13" froe was the tool of choice for me.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X94MPJigySQ

Take a look at a smith making one. Maybe you can work a deal or trade with a smith in your area.
 

Jim Roche

jim
User
There is a guy in Rolesville ( a suburb of Raleigh) that specializes in hand tools, you may want to give him a try, he'd probably even ship it to you if you want. I forget his name but here's his number: 678-923-3661. You can look at some of his tools by getting on the Raleigh Craigslist and search under "woodworking".

hope this helps,
Jim
 

Rick M

Rick
Corporate Member
Speaking of making froes, I've read complaints that modern froes are often too thin and not wedge shaped. Thoughts or comments on that?
-- Rick M
 

Gofor

Mark
Corporate Member
Speaking of making froes, I've read complaints that modern froes are often too thin and not wedge shaped. Thoughts or comments on that?
-- Rick M
I bought this one a while back: http://www.leevalley.com/US/garden/page.aspx?p=67231&cat=2,44728,45794,67231. I did end up using a belt sander to taper mine a bit more, but it does work okay for splitting billets out of wet oak logs, etc. and is thick enough not to warp or bend during use. I also have used it for splitting saplings for walking sticks, and it works fine for that.

If anything, I would like a wider (edge to spine) one for a bit more leverage and control. I would give this one 5 stars for durability, but probably 3 stars for design and utility. Wider, with a broader back to slow the damage to the mallet, and with a longer taper would be better in my opinion, but it does get the job done. For smaller stuff, I use an old hunting knife that has a full taper to the back, but that is more of a splitting action, not riving.

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