Learning Woodworker in Raleigh

djyoungcity

djyoungcity
User
Male 32 years old new to woodworking here in Raleigh. We live near Crabtree Mall. Slowly getting a 1 car garage shop built out. Right now working with a basic table saw and miter saw to get things going (along with lots of hand held tools, power and non-powered). Would love to get to know more people in the area and work off experience of setting up shop layout/working through projects/understanding more of what I should look for when buying upgrades to the shop. I don't want to spend money to spend money, but don't want to buy the same tool in 2 years because I outgrew it.

Next upgrades to the shop:
1) Air Filtration System - ive heard this makes a big difference in airborne dust, and for the price of these, seems like a no-brainer.
2) Sub-Panel with 60 amp service and 220 and 110 outlets installed throughout garage. Right now I have about 1/2 of 1 15amp circuit with 1 outlet in the garage. Very limiting is an understatement
3) Drill Press
4) Band Saw (would like re-saw and curve cutting abilities in 1)
5) Oscillating Sander/Belt/Disc Sander
6) Lumber Rack
7) Upgraded Table Saw, current fence just is not up to snuff and the power is lacking for anything above pine. Eyeing the saw stop, but the price is just quite a bit. But my fingers are worth 10x that price.
8) Router Table - Possibly integrated into saw stop, just to save space
9) True Dust Collection System with 4 inch pipes. Right now I have 2 shopvacs with 2.5" blast gates for table saw/miter saw/aux ports for cleanup.
10) Planer
11) Jointer
12) Maybe scroll saw, depends on how good of a band saw I get that can keep tension on those small blades.
13) Bosch Sliding Miter Saw, more a want than a need at this point for what I use it for

Current Projects:
- Assembly table with storage/built in shop vac
- Miter saw station with storage/built in shop vac

Future Projects:
- Lumber Rack
- Built ins for living room
- Breakfast nook/built in benches
- Floating Shelves in bathroom
- Coffee table for basement
- Console table for basement
- L Computer desk with cabinets above
- Storage/workbench for wife's crafting habit
- Potting bench for wife's gardening habit

I love reading all the projects and ideas people have on here and hopefully will be able to add to the community over time.
 
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RedBeard

Burns
Corporate Member
Welcome to the site. I live about 5 minutes up from Crabtree. No where nearly as accomplished as a lot of people on this site but I have done most of the projects you have listed that you want to do. As my wife will tell you this is not a particularly cheap hobby. IMO the best way to accumulate all the tools you’re wanting is buy them on an as needed basis and over time you will end up with a well stocked shop. I have always had good luck buying used. I check CL and FB marketplace regularly. The best advice I can give when buying used is wait for the right deal but be ready to pounce quickly. You’re welcome to check out/use what I’ve got if you would like.
 

Graywolf

Board of Directors, Vice President
Richard
Corporate Member
Welcome to the forum, you’ll learn a lot here.
 

Pop Golden

Pop
Corporate Member
A few ideas: Air filter take a look at the Axiom Stratus. I think it's the best improvement so far.
Router table look at JessEm I have been very happy with mine.
Dust Collection look over the Harbor Fright DC with the Dust Deputy upstream. My son has this system for 2 or 3 years and has yet to empty the bag on the DC. The Dust Deputy gets it all.
Scroll saw try to find an old DeWalt 2nd hand. The newer models aren't as well made.
Just my 2 cents for what it's worth.

Pop
 

SabertoothBunny

SabertoothBunny
User
I would encourage you to look into the WEN tools. They are a step up from the Harbor Freight and I would say as good as Ryobi if not better. WEN are great starter tools overall at a really reasonable price. I personally have they hand planer, adjustable router (a bit chunky but powerful), and got their 10" band saw last month on sale. The band saw has been chewing through cherry, elm, and oak without too much difficulty.

WEN offers pretty much everything on your list to include air filtration systems. It is a good way to get started and learn tools before investing substantial money into tools you may not use again or rarely.
 

Herdfan2005

Jason
Senior User
Welcome, I'm over in Knightdale with a modest shop with budget friendly tools, happy to catch up and talk shop over brews. 40M.

I put in a 60amp subpanel on my own (permits and all) when I moved to town 2 years ago, money and time well spent. No power issues in my garage now. I run a 240v dust collector and table saw.
 

djyoungcity

djyoungcity
User
I would encourage you to look into the WEN tools. They are a step up from the Harbor Freight and I would say as good as Ryobi if not better. WEN are great starter tools overall at a really reasonable price. I personally have they hand planer, adjustable router (a bit chunky but powerful), and got their 10" band saw last month on sale. The band saw has been chewing through cherry, elm, and oak without too much difficulty.

WEN offers pretty much everything on your list to include air filtration systems. It is a good way to get started and learn tools before investing substantial money into tools you may not use again or rarely.
I am eying WEN tools as the good middle ground for now. Things like the Air Filtration, Band Saw, Sander (oscillating/Belt), Drill Press, etc. They all seem to be really well designed and built for the money.
 
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Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
Welcome to NCWW. You have a big list of "next upgrades to the shop"! How's your budget?

Priorities for your new shop, maybe.....

1. Upgrade the electrical system adding mostly circuits at 115 volts with 20 amp breakers

1 outlet in the garage. Very limiting is an understatement
2. What kinds of tools do you have now and who are they made by? Dewalt, Bosch, Craftsman, etc. Which ones do you use most frequently? Upgrade as required/needed but buy the best that you can afford at this time.

I don't want to spend money to spend money, but don't want to buy the same tool in 2 years because I outgrew it.
Eyeing the saw stop, but the price is just quite a bit. But my fingers are worth 10x that price.
A Sawstop won't save your fingers but may help prevent a more serious injury. The safest thing with any table saw is for YOU to practice good safety techniques.
 

djyoungcity

djyoungcity
User
Welcome to NCWW. You have a big list of "next upgrades to the shop"! How's your budget?

Priorities for your new shop, maybe.....

1. Upgrade the electrical system adding mostly circuits at 115 volts with 20 amp breakers
I 100% agree with this statement, thats why its number 1 on the list. Hard to do anything in the shop now without flipping a breaker. I plan for 2-3 220 receptacles and at least 2-3 110 20 amp circuits. Whoever decided 1 outlet in a garage bay shared with the entire basement did not think through what a garage should be used for...

2. What kinds of tools do you have now and who are they made by? Dewalt, Bosch, Craftsman, etc. Which ones do you use most frequently? Upgrade as required/needed but buy the best that you can afford at this time.
- Miter saw dual bevel 12 inch non sliding - Metabo/Hitachi
- 10 Inch Kobalt Jobsite Table Saw. Was a steal for $179 but the fence is always 1/4 off or more from one side to the other. It does have a 30 inch rip capacity, so that has had me keep it around longer than I should
- Handheld routers/circular saw/drills/impact/multi tool etc
- Yes the dirty word in some parts, a Kreg K5. This thing has helped stand up all of my shop furniture quicker and easier than anticipated.
- I am in the Ryobi line of battery tools and honestly very pleased, could they be better, probably, but for 1/3 of what other tools cost, they perform well for me.


I use Miter saw and Table saw the most now (as its all I have), its 1 step at a time on a per project basis, and looking at spending 300-400 a month or so to get it where it needs to be.
Keeping a list of priorities and projects help me stay in check to not buy something and not use it.

A Sawstop won't save your fingers but may help prevent a more serious injury. The safest thing with any table saw is for YOU to practice good safety techniques.
- Agreed there learning how to create safe and accurate cuts is more important than relying on a backup safety mechanism. Something about another 1500 to prevent a bigger injury seems worth it to me though. I know 2 people with stumpy nubs from table saw injuries. Their fault or not, anything to reduce risk in the shop is a good investment in my eye.
 
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Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
I 100% agree with this statement, thats why its number 1 on the list. Hard to do anything in the shop now without flipping a breaker. I plan for 2-3 220 receptacles and at least 2-3 110 20 amp circuits. Whoever decided 1 outlet in a garage bay shared with the entire basement did not think through what a garage should be used for...


- Miter saw dual bevel 12 inch non sliding - Metabo/Hitachi
- 10 Inch Kobalt Jobsite Table Saw. Was a steal for $179 but the fence is always 1/4 off or more from one side to the other. It does have a 30 inch rip capacity, so that has had me keep it around longer than I should
- Handheld routers/circular saw/drills/impact/multi tool etc
- Yes the dirty word in some parts, a Kreg K5. This thing has helped stand up all of my shop furniture quicker and easier than anticipated.
- I am in the Ryobi line of battery tools and honestly very pleased, could they be better, probably, but for 1/3 of what other tools cost, they perform well for me.


I use Miter saw and Table saw the most now (as its all I have), its 1 step at a time on a per project basis, and looking at spending 300-400 a month or so to get it where it needs to be.
Keeping a list of priorities and projects help me stay in check to not buy something and not use it.


- Agreed there learning how to create safe and accurate cuts is more important than relying on a backup safety mechanism. Something about another 1500 to prevent a bigger injury seems worth it to me though. I know 2 people with stumpy nubs from table saw injuries. Their fault or not, anything to reduce risk in the shop is a good investment in my eye.
That's fine, carry on and make some more sawdust!
 

Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
You too, make alot of sawdust, but keep the shop clean too
I'm in a 2 car garage without cars but I can only use 1/2 of it because of all of our other stuff in the other half. I usually clean as I go and can keep it fairly clean with the ShopVac and a lawn blower.
 

Phil S

Board of Directors, President
Phil Soper
Staff member
Corporate Member
I am in NE Raleigh. You are welcome to visit. I have a reasonably well equipped shop. You can test drive both power and hand tools.
 

djyoungcity

djyoungcity
User
Thanks to everyone for such a warm welcome. If y’all get PMs from me a couple months or what’s down the road to hang and talk shop, don’t think it’s weird.
 

Alex Stokes

New User
Alex
You've found the right place, loads of good friends, experience, advice - and directions to find equipment and also - **wood**!!
 

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