Help with this Repair...

mpnmatthews

New User
Mike
Repairing a 1950 Hammond C-2 and Tone Cabinet...

This cabinet has endured some injuries to the inside of the cabinet... See pics below.

Can this be repaired or replaced? Best techniques? A molding product, perhaps?

I was thinking of cutting away the damaged portion and attaching a replacement piece of wood with horizontal wooden pegs or steel pins and wood glue. Sink two vertical screws through the upper joint and clamp up.

Your thoughts?
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Attachments

FlyingRon

Board of Directors, Webmaster
Ron
Staff member
Corporate Member
DQ
Hard to see, but it looks like you could just replace the entire vertical style (at least up to some point) using whatever joinery was holding it in to begin with.
 

mpnmatthews

New User
Mike
Hard to see, but it looks like you could just replace the entire vertical style (at least up to some point) using whatever joinery was holding it in to begin with.
That's what I was thinking...

I was also thinking that I could put on a wrap-around brass kick plate... That would cover most of this damage and also provide some additional structural strength. I do also want to put some low-key profile ball bearing casters on the cabinet to facilitate moving it around the room.
 

JimD

Jim
Senior User
DQ
I agree it is hard to see exactly what is going on but if the damage is only to the veneer, the material underneith is solid, just somewhat stained, I would put new veneer on matching it to the old as well as possible. If you refinish the whole thing it will help it blend in.
 

TENdriver

TENdriver
User
If the tenons weren’t exposed, you could repair in place by planing the damaged area on a diagonal and scarfing in new material. Then plane back to original dimensions. It’s possible it could still work. I’d use a longer ruler to see if it would.

The other option (if possible) is to pull the vertical stiles. Do the same scarfs and mortise to allow for the tenons.

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Last option is fully replace the stiles.

Others may come up with additional options, but those are the first three that come to mind.


Lastly, I would try to determine what caused the damage and see if there’s a practical way to “armor” that area!
 
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Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
DQ
That looks like localized water damage at the base of the legs extending upward a few inches. Was that organ somehow sitting in standing water?

What's the back part of the organ look like? I don't recall seeing a pic of those parts.
 

mpnmatthews

New User
Mike
That looks like localized water damage at the base of the legs extending upward a few inches. Was that organ somehow sitting in standing water?

What's the back part of the organ look like? I don't recall seeing a pic of those parts.
Well yes, I do have photos of the back... Here they are.

But I don't think this is water damage, although I can't be sure since someone else (possibly several people) owned this organ in the 68 yrs before I got it.

There is virtually no damage to the back base panel of the organ, and the pieces that came off and left these injuries were split off from the styles... Jagged edges, lots of splinters, and the wood was so tight that I could put those peices back and they would be held in place.

I'm leaning towards using a structural, moldable wood filler like the Abatron Wood restoration kit. It stabilizes and protects the wood and will provide long-lasting results as this organ will be kept inside.

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redknife

Chris
Corporate Member
DQ
I’ve used a fair bit of that Abatron Wood restoration on outside trim rot repairs. I know you can dye and stain it but I think it would be hard to make it look right. I’ve always painted it. For interior use, you don’t need the Liquidwood protection that Abatron provides, although it is necessary as a primer. Outdoors, you get the benefit of rot stabilization and structure. Indoors it is an expensive product that adds to the finish difficulty. If you do choose to use it, don’t overapply the WoodEpox as it is hard to sand.

The problem I see with that diagonal repair is that it will not hold up to sheer stress without some joinery. Looks like a foot hit as one turned away could knock it off.

Well yes, I do have photos of the back... Here they are.

But I don't think this is water damage, although I can't be sure since someone else (possibly several people) owned this organ in the 68 yrs before I got it.

There is virtually no damage to the back base panel of the organ, and the pieces that came off and left these injuries were split off from the styles... Jagged edges, lots of splinters, and the wood was so tight that I could put those peices back and they would be held in place.

I'm leaning towards using a structural, moldable wood filler like the Abatron Wood restoration kit. It stabilizes and protects the wood and will provide long-lasting results as this organ will be kept inside.

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