Hand saw recommendation

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manfre

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Manfre
I'm looking to purchase a hand saw to cut dovetails and tenons, but don't want to dive in just yet and get specialized saws for each task. I might find that I don't like it as much and don't want to invest too heavily in specialized hand tools just yet. The only hand saws I have right now are a flush cut saw and a tree limbing saw. Any recommendations on what saw to purchase?
 

cyclopentadiene

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I purchased a Dozuki saw and never use any other handsaw in my collection. It is very versatile for all types of cutting from dovetails to flush cut. It is also very fast.
 

kooshball

David
Corporate Member
I have dedicated saws for each task but unless your are cutting large tenons you really only need two (don't forget you will need to crosscut the shoulder of the tenon).

On the rip side of things I recommend any of the saws from Bad Axe tools. They make many different sizes so you can easily select your rip saw to be large enough for 90% of your tenons but still easy to handle on the dovetails. Assuming that you will true up your shoulders with a plane you can be less selective on the crosscut saw for now and just pickup something used at the shop above the Woodwright's school in Pittsboro.

I have found hand cut dovetails to be faster for me since I am not doing repetitive, production work...if you change your mind you will be able to get most if not all your money back out of the those saws by selling them.
 

kooshball

David
Corporate Member
Forgot to add that bad axe has an "all purpose" tooth option which could eliminate the need for a second saw...

Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2
 

Mike Davis

Mike
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oldetoolworkshop

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Aaron
I really tried to use non-dovetail saws to cut dovetails but ended up getting one anyway and my dovetails definitely got better. Here is my recommendation,

1) Buy a dedicated dovetail saw either vintage (Ed Lebetkin's shop over the Woodwright's School has a good selection of older but good users) or get a new one from Lie-Neilson as Mike suggested or a 16 tpi Veritas from Lee-Valley here => http://www.leevalley.com/US/Wood/page.aspx?p=64007&cat=1,42884,68511&ap=1 $68

2) For an overall crosscut and rip combo you can't beat a sash saw. They do both really well. You could probably get a vintage one at Ed's and have Bill Anderson file it special for you. Here is some more information on these => http://thesawblog.com/?p=1362

These two saws can do most of your bench sawing (aside from having a turning saw these are nice too :)). Contact Matt Cianci on "The Saw Blog" web site, he is a great guy and lives for saws. If he can't answer your questions no one can.

-Aaron
 

manfre

New User
Manfre
Great responses so far.

The Bad Axe saws are impressive, but definitely more than I'm willing to lay out right now, even if they retain their value for resale.

The crown gent's saw will most likely be the saw I buy because at $26 shipped, it's well within my budget and is cheap enough that I could let it collect dust without feeling guilty and not expensive enough to prevent me from upgrading in the future.
 

Roy G

Roy
Senior User
For dovetails and cutting tenons, be sure to get a rip-tooth saw. My experience is it goes much faster than if you try to use a carcase saw with cross-cut teeth.

Roy G
 

kooshball

David
Corporate Member
Manfre, I have one the gents saws mentioned...you are welcomed to borrow it and see what you think.
 

Rick M

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Rick
+1 Roy. Definitely get a saw filed for rip cuts unless you really like moving your arm back and forth while hearing zzzz,zzzz,zzzz and not getting anywhere. :D A properly set and sharpened rip saw is an eye opening experience.
 

KenOfCary

Ken
Staff member
Corporate Member
I like the Veritas saws from Lee Valley, both the rip and crosscut carcass saws and the newer dovetail saw for, you guessed it, dovetails. I also have a couple of older saws I got from Ed's shop, that I should probably get rid of now that the Veritas is my goto dovetail saw.

Need a decent Dovetail saw for the tool chest, Mike?
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
If its better than the gents saw Tim donated, sure. Otherwise, maybe my son could use it.

I'm still building his tool set too.
 

bluedawg76

New User
Sam
+1
I like the Veritas saws from Lee Valley, both the rip and crosscut carcass saws and the newer dovetail saw
i've been quite happy with these. If I had to choose one, I'd go for a rip pattern. A small rip saw can still crosscut well as long as the rake is not too aggressive ~8 degrees or so, but a standard crosscut saw w/ a 15 degree rake is much too slow for rip cuts imo.
 

manfre

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Manfre
Thinking out loud... I could get a good rip saw and cross cut with the circular saw. I have a guide and good blades so there shouldn't really be any tear out. I also am not motivated to complete projects only using hand tools.
 

bluedawg76

New User
Sam
I'm looking to purchase a hand saw to cut dovetails and tenons, but don't want to dive in just yet and get specialized saws for each task.
not sure a circular saw would work as well here, ymmv

I also am not motivated to complete projects only using hand tools.
i don't think it's that binary. I commonly use both hand and power tools to complete a project as do most folks. I generally choose the tool best suited to the task and my mood.
 

kooshball

David
Corporate Member
not sure a circular saw would work as well here, ymmv


i don't think it's that binary. I commonly use both hand and power tools to complete a project as do most folks. I generally choose the tool best suited to the task and my mood.
+1 like I mentioned before, I am more comfortable and faster with hand saws for joinery...but I would never contemplate ripping a pice of 4/4 stock for a dining table by hand...
 
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