Grizzly Combo 12” Jointer/Planer 120v

Johnathon

J Flip
User
Was browsing today and came across this tool at Grizzly: 12" Combo Planer/Jointer at Grizzly.com

In my shop 220v isn't an option without a significant electrical overhaul. So this may be a good option to get me more than 6" capacity in a 110v/15amp tool. It still has short beds, but I might be able to deal if it means I can stop ripping and regluing every board I buy.

Just thought I'd share for others who might be in my situation.
 

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smurg

Marty
Senior User
I have heard a lot of heartache with the budget combo units (Jet), but don't have any experience with this Grizzly unit in particular.
 

Johnathon

J Flip
User
I have heard a lot of heartache with the budget combo units (Jet), but don't have any experience with this Grizzly unit in particular.
I've heard the same. Not sure if this will be any better. I'll probably wait for some more reviews before I jump.
 

petebucy4638

Pete
Corporate Member
Was browsing today and came across this tool at Grizzly: 12" Combo Planer/Jointer at Grizzly.com

In my shop 220v isn't an option without a significant electrical overhaul. So this may be a good option to get me more than 6" capacity in a 110v/15amp tool. It still has short beds, but I might be able to deal if it means I can stop ripping and regluing every board I buy.

Just thought I'd share for others who might be in my situation.
One of the things that often restricts adding 220v outlets in a shop is that the panel is full of breakers. If the load capacity is there, you can often rectify this by installing a subpanel. If all you need is one or two 220v outlets, another solution is to isolate low-load 120v circuits, such as lighting circuits or other circuits with light loads and connecting two of those circuits together with a wire nut and a third wire (pigtail) and connecting the two circuits to one breaker. If it is a 15 amp breaker, you might want to replace it with a 20 amp breaker. You may have to shuffle a few breakers around, but this can often allow you to add one or more double pole, 220v breakers to your shop. If you don't want to pull wire to distant points in your shop, a good #10 extension cord with the right outlets can get the job done and offer you some flexibility to move your equipment around, if needed. Just a thought.
 

Johnathon

J Flip
User
One of the things that often restricts adding 220v outlets in a shop is that the panel is full of breakers. If the load capacity is there, you can often rectify this by installing a subpanel. If all you need is one or two 220v outlets, another solution is to isolate low-load 120v circuits, such as lighting circuits or other circuits with light loads and connecting two of those circuits together with a wire nut and a third wire (pigtail) and connecting the two circuits to one breaker. If it is a 15 amp breaker, you might want to replace it with a 20 amp breaker. You may have to shuffle a few breakers around, but this can often allow you to add one or more double pole, 220v breakers to your shop. If you don't want to pull wire to distant points in your shop, a good #10 extension cord with the right outlets can get the job done and offer you some flexibility to move your equipment around, if needed. Just a thought.
Unfortunately it's not that simple. My detached garage was built in the 70s and is wired with a single 30amp breaker from the panel in the house. The house is also underserved, with a 100amp service. So between having to upgrade the service, replace the main panel, and install a sub (or more likely run a new service/main to the garage and make the house panel the sub), I'm in for a lot more money than I have just to get 220v in the garage.

It'd be cheaper to buy a full set of Lie-Nielson tools and switch to manpower.
 

ssmith

Scott
Senior User
… If all you need is one or two 220v outlets, another solution is to isolate low-load 120v circuits, such as lighting circuits or other circuits with light loads and connecting two of those circuits together with a wire nut and a third wire (pigtail) and connecting the two circuits to one breaker. If it is a 15 amp breaker, you might want to replace it with a 20 amp breaker. …
Before bumping to a 20A breaker you’d need to confirm both legs use 12 gauge wire. 14 gauge on a 20A breaker could be overloaded. Another solution would be to free up slots by replacing 1 or more full height breakers with 2 half-height breakers sized to the wire (14 ga / 15 A, 12 ga / 20 A).
 

bowman

Board of Directors, Webmaster
Neal
Staff member
Corporate Member
Before bumping to a 20A breaker you’d need to confirm both legs use 12 gauge wire. 14 gauge on a 20A breaker could be overloaded. Another solution would be to free up slots by replacing 1 or more full height breakers with 2 half-height breakers sized to the wire (14 ga / 15 A, 12 ga / 20 A).
I agree with this comment and process to free up space in the breaker box
 

petebucy4638

Pete
Corporate Member
Before bumping to a 20A breaker you’d need to confirm both legs use 12 gauge wire. 14 gauge on a 20A breaker could be overloaded. Another solution would be to free up slots by replacing 1 or more full height breakers with 2 half-height breakers sized to the wire (14 ga / 15 A, 12 ga / 20 A).
Before bumping to a 20A breaker you’d need to confirm both legs use 12 gauge wire. 14 gauge on a 20A breaker could be overloaded. Another solution would be to free up slots by replacing 1 or more full height breakers with 2 half-height breakers sized to the wire (14 ga / 15 A, 12 ga / 20 A).
Absolutely, you should not use a 20 amp breaker on a 15 gauge or smaller conductor. I have found that it is not uncommon to find 15 amp breakers on #12 conductors. I should have added that caveat in my post. Thanks for pointing that out.
 

Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
Was browsing today and came across this tool at Grizzly: 12" Combo Planer/Jointer at Grizzly.com

In my shop 220v isn't an option without a significant electrical overhaul. So this may be a good option to get me more than 6" capacity in a 110v/15amp tool. It still has short beds, but I might be able to deal if it means I can stop ripping and regluing every board I buy.

Just thought I'd share for others who might be in my situation.
My dad had one similar to that, European; and the last time I saw it was probably 50 years ago when he was still alive.

He did all his jointing and planing on that machine, and built stuff I can only dream of.

1668885476420.png
 

smurg

Marty
Senior User
My dad had one similar to that, European; and the last time I saw it was probably 50 years ago when he was still alive.

He did all his jointing and planing on that machine, and built stuff I can only dream of.

View attachment 214888
The heavy iron SCM or Feldor models are completely solid if you're talking about something like that. Where it can be touch and go is with the cheaper benchtop units.
 

BKHam

Bradley
User
complaints about tools are the same as restaurants. people tell many more people about your bad experiences than your good ones. the machine prob works as it says it does.

judging from the size, the machine looks pretty light duty. If it suits your working, it could be a cool space saver.
 

brdobbs

Beau
User
I have a 13" Hammer combo unit. It has a 3 or 5 hp motor in it, and weighs about 800lbs. I've never had issues with it over the past 10 years. This unit is only 1.5hp, so I think you might find it lacking with larger, dense boards. But get the best tools you can afford, and fit into your shop, and go from there.
 

drw

Donn
Corporate Member
Willem, I have seen your Dad's work (Phil has some pieces) and it is beautiful...he was a true craftsman. That said, if there is a "woodworking gene", it seems to have been passed on to you.
 

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