Floating Shelf with Shaper and Power Feeder

Jeremy Scuteri

Jeremy
Staff member
Corporate Member
I spent some time using the shaper with the power feeder that I installed back in February. (https://ncwoodworker.net/forums/index.php?threads/power-feeder-mounting-install.69273/)

I'm making a floating shelf for a soundbar that will sit under a wall mounted TV. I'm really impressed with the finish that comes off the shaper.


I wasn't able to use the power feeder for the edges, but I had a sled that worked well. I did have to move the cutterhead up when using the sled which was a bit of a pain.
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Auxiliary fence for the drill press. This thing has gotten a lot of use for different tasks, originally made for the tablesaw.
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Holes and the mounting hardware.
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bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
I did have to move the cutterhead up when using the sled which was a bit of a pain.
Nice photos.
Yep, adjusting the cutter up to compensate for the thickness of the sled is the nature of the beast sometimes but its clear that the result was worth the effort. You got things the way they needed to be.
 

Skymaster

Jack
Senior User
Jeremy, try this next time for the rails. cut the lumber to width DO NOT RIP, run full widths thru with feeder, then rip to width
 

Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
Looks nice Jeremy.
How are you going to support that on the wall?
Floating shelves seem to be the new trend, I am putting out around $1,500 a month of those right now. Envelope which fits I’ve a frame.

.
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Jeremy Scuteri

Jeremy
Staff member
Corporate Member
How are you going to support that on the wall?
The mounting hardware in the last pic is located so that it will be screwed into studs. I'm hoping that will be enough. We will see how that goes, this is my first floating shelf.
 

Jeremy Scuteri

Jeremy
Staff member
Corporate Member
Jeremy, try this next time for the rails. cut the lumber to width DO NOT RIP, run full widths thru with feeder, then rip to width
How much width do you think is needed to run the edges through the shaper with the power feeder (as opposed to using the sled and having to raise and lower the cutterhead).
 

chris_goris

Chris
Senior User
Jeremy, whenever I have had to do something like this (end grain shaping) , I clamp a sacrificial board across both fence faces, something thin is fine, like 1/4 plywood. I do this before setting the cutter depth relative to the fence face (axial distance) so the cutter is behind this fence. Now this next step is not for the faint of heart but on my shaper its quite easy and safe. I turn on the shaper and "plunge" the cutter through the fence by backing up the entire fence. With my PM2700 the entire fence is guided by a large pipe so it seamlessly and easily is handcranked back. with yours, youll need to just push it back. when you plunge through you end up with a zero clearance insert like on a tablesaw and solid material under and all around the cutter. I do all of this as to block off any possible way of the workpiece (some can be narrow) getting sucked into the cutter as it is unsupported by the fence, like the hold down clamps do on your sled. Then you can run your long lengths with your feeder and simply use a miter slide to do the ends.
 

Skymaster

Jack
Senior User
How much width do you think is needed to run the edges through the shaper with the power feeder (as opposed to using the sled and having to raise and lower the cutterhead).
Jeremy, lets say rails are 2 1/2" and you have x? stock, just figure how many 2 1/2" pc in it, so 2x8 is really 7 1/2" 3 2 1/2 is 7 1/2 so make them 2 1/4 and you get 3 per a 2x8. How many rails needed divided by 3 equals how many 2 x 8 pcs cut to exact rail overal length. Run the pile thru shaper, then rip to correct rail width on tablesaw. I am going to start doing this also.I believe this will save effort,time etc plus feeder is working not us
 

kserdar

Ken
User
The mounting hardware in the last pic is located so that it will be screwed into studs. I'm hoping that will be enough. We will see how that goes, this is my first floating shelf.
The holes for mounting to the wall appear to be much wider then a 2x4? Also, how does it attach to the shelf?
 

Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
The mounting hardware in the last pic is located so that it will be screwed into studs. I'm hoping that will be enough. We will see how that goes, this is my first floating shelf.
You will be fine, there will be a bit of flexing , but can carry quite a bit of weight.
 

Willemjm

Willem
Corporate Member
Jeremy, whenever I have had to do something like this (end grain shaping) , I clamp a sacrificial board across both fence faces, something thin is fine, like 1/4 plywood. I do this before setting the cutter depth relative to the fence face (axial distance) so the cutter is behind this fence. Now this next step is not for the faint of heart but on my shaper its quite easy and safe. I turn on the shaper and "plunge" the cutter through the fence by backing up the entire fence. With my PM2700 the entire fence is guided by a large pipe so it seamlessly and easily is handcranked back. with yours, youll need to just push it back. when you plunge through you end up with a zero clearance insert like on a tablesaw and solid material under and all around the cutter. I do all of this as to block off any possible way of the workpiece (some can be narrow) getting sucked into the cutter as it is unsupported by the fence, like the hold down clamps do on your sled. Then you can run your long lengths with your feeder and simply use a miter slide to do the ends.
I do this as simple as possible. Use my table saw miter gauge with a fence and just do a bunch of small cuts until I reach the shaper fence. Do the short cuts first and the long cuts with power feeder removes any tear-out.

Your method is a good trick though, I must remember that.

If I have to do a whole bunch I have a pneumatic jig, rides on air, but it set up for all my cope cuts on a dedicated shaper so there is setup time involved. For one or two shelves the simple method beats time.
 
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Jeremy Scuteri

Jeremy
Staff member
Corporate Member
The holes for mounting to the wall appear to be much wider then a 2x4? Also, how does it attach to the shelf?
Yes, I'll only get one screw in a stud, the other will be in a drywall anchor. I think friction will keep the supports in the shelf. There is a cross hole in the mount, not sure how useful it will be.
 

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