Farm table build

LocoWoodWork

Steve
Senior User
Making a rustic farm table for youngest daughter. Most of the wood is RO which has been air drying for nearly three years. The legs are 3"X4"X29" rough cut pine, tapered bottom insides and notched on top outsides to accept the skirts. She wants it rough looking and prefers the stain/weathered appearance. I'm going to try and grey/age the inside of the legs (tapered cuts) to better match the rest of the wood. She wants to try and keep it from looking red (they call it RO for a reason ;)), so I'll try my best. Here is a progress report:
https://photos.app.goo.gl/pEkuq62EAxjS1hh8A
 

Henry W

HenryW
Senior User
I'm going to try and grey/age the inside of the legs (tapered cuts) to better match the rest of the wood. She wants to try and keep it from looking red (they call it RO for a reason ;)), so I'll try my best.
I have no experience with this product but have seen an ad from Klingspor's that it was on sale earlier this month
https://www.woodworkingshop.com/product/pn00201/
Here the product description
"[FONT=&amp]Pioneer Wood Patina is a safe, water based powder concentrate. When applied to new wood this product gives the surface a "barn wood" patina. Gives any home project, interior or exterior, that warm, rustic, barn wood look. Perfect for contractors and DIY projects such as siding, decking and hand rails, interior accent walls and furniture."

6$/qt or $15/gallon

if you use it please post a review. I am curious.

AND - table looking good so far!


[/FONT]
 
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LocoWoodWork

Steve
Senior User
I'll keep you posted and share info on any products I may use.

I have no experience with this product but have seen an ad from Klingspor's that it was on sale earlier this month
https://www.woodworkingshop.com/product/pn00201/
Here the product description
"[FONT=&amp]Pioneer Wood Patina is a safe, water based powder concentrate. When applied to new wood this product gives the surface a "barn wood" patina. Gives any home project, interior or exterior, that warm, rustic, barn wood look. Perfect for contractors and DIY projects such as siding, decking and hand rails, interior accent walls and furniture."

6$/qt or $15/gallon

if you use it please post a review. I am curious.

AND - table looking good so far!


[/FONT]
 

photostu

Stuart
Senior User
Do you mind explaining the joinery between the legs and the apron? It looks like a lap joint, but not exactly a half lap, the exterior potion of the apron remaining looks very thin. Am I mis-seeing this? Just curious as I get ready to build a table base as well.
 

Chilihead

Chilihead
User
I've had really good luck aging oak for that barnwood look with a solution made from dissolving steel wool in vinegar. It makes a chemical stain. The process takes a few minutes for the solution to react with the tanin in the wood. So if you try it be patient and don't put too much on at first.
 

LocoWoodWork

Steve
Senior User
Me explaining joinery...:rotflm: Google seems to refer to this joinery as "corner full half lap joint". Basically, the top of the legs (outside facing) are cut so that the aprons/skirts sit flush with the outside of the legs. Here's a pic I found online https://photos.app.goo.gl/wBqv6xkwfCNBGLkp8

Do you mind explaining the joinery between the legs and the apron? It looks like a lap joint, but not exactly a half lap, the exterior potion of the apron remaining looks very thin. Am I mis-seeing this? Just curious as I get ready to build a table base as well.
 

LocoWoodWork

Steve
Senior User
I read about that technique. Does it leave a "red look"? Daughter does not want "red" looking table, might have to get some maple or hickory. If not I may try the vinegar concoction.

I've had really good luck aging oak for that barnwood look with a solution made from dissolving steel wool in vinegar. It makes a chemical stain. The process takes a few minutes for the solution to react with the tanin in the wood. So if you try it be patient and don't put too much on at first.
 

Roy G

Roy
Senior User
Steve, how rough are you going to leave it? You might get a few comments when sweaters are snagged.

Roy G
 

Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
Similar to this but both faces of the leg corner are cut out like your photo.

https://www.woodmagazine.com/woodworking-tips/techniques/joinery/half-lap-joints

In addition to glue on the leg corner joints/skirts are you going to also use dowel pins through the skirts into the legs?






Me explaining joinery...:rotflm: Google seems to refer to this joinery as "corner full half lap joint". Basically, the top of the legs (outside facing) are cut so that the aprons/skirts sit flush with the outside of the legs. Here's a pic I found online https://photos.app.goo.gl/wBqv6xkwfCNBGLkp8
 
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Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
Doesn't that vinegar/steel wool mixture turn black when it reacts with the tannins present in the red or white oak? Maybe a light application turns gray (a lighter shade of black). I wonder how it'll look on the pine legs which don't contain much tannic acid? :icon_scra


I've had really good luck aging oak for that barnwood look with a solution made from dissolving steel wool in vinegar. It makes a chemical stain. The process takes a few minutes for the solution to react with the tanin in the wood. So if you try it be patient and don't put too much on at first.
 

Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
I know nothing about it but take a look at their FAQ page. It's cheap enough to try for the heck of it.

http://www.pioneer-wood.com/faq


I have no experience with this product but have seen an ad from Klingspor's that it was on sale earlier this month
https://www.woodworkingshop.com/product/pn00201/
Here the product description
"[FONT=&amp]Pioneer Wood Patina is a safe, water based powder concentrate. When applied to new wood this product gives the surface a "barn wood" patina. Gives any home project, interior or exterior, that warm, rustic, barn wood look. Perfect for contractors and DIY projects such as siding, decking and hand rails, interior accent walls and furniture."

6$/qt or $15/gallon

if you use it please post a review. I am curious.

AND - table looking good so far!


[/FONT]
 

LocoWoodWork

Steve
Senior User
I've sanded the legs smooth enough that there are no sweater snags and plan to do the same for the top/skirts while leaving some saw marks for character. If it's to snaggy upon completion I'll probably coat the legs/skirts with a few coats of satin water based poly.

Steve, how rough are you going to leave it? You might get a few comments when sweaters are snagged.

Roy G

I do plan to use dowels through skirts/legs in addition to glue.

Similar to this but both faces of the leg corner are cut out like your photo.

https://www.woodmagazine.com/woodworking-tips/techniques/joinery/half-lap-joints

In addition to glue on the leg corner joints/skirts are you going to also use dowel pins through the skirts into the legs?
 

LocoWoodWork

Steve
Senior User
Managed to get a little more done on the table. I used a grinder with a rough sanding disk to "groove the inside of the legs IOT try and match the sawmill marks on the outside. Once this was done, granddaughter helped stain the grooves with leftover firewood charcoal from the BBQ pit. 183800


Daughter picked-up some weathered wood stain which we used on the legs and aprons. This actually blended the YP legs and RO aprons pretty well according to her... that's all that matters as I work for fun not for $$$.
183802


I glued, clamped and fastened aprons to the legs with 3" wood screws.

183803


Next I cut some oak strips, pre drilled, glued and fastened to the inside of the apron corners.

183804


Next I cut some 3/4" plywood corner brackets. These are also glued, clamped and screwed into the oak strips mentioned above.


183806


Next, I removed on 3" screw at a time, drilled a 3/8" and glued in a 3/8" dowel where each screw was previously located.


183807
183807


Here you see the freshly inserted dowels. Color change is due to wiping off excess glue with wet rag.



183808

One coat of water based poly. Also added center support piece (sure it's called something else)
 

LocoWoodWork

Steve
Senior User
Dry fitting the top. Still need to plane the bottom of the top's boards as they are not the same thickness
183940
183941
183942
. Once planed, I plan to instal biscuits, glue-up and sand the top so that it matches the aprons. (Smooth but with saw marks) Then it will be a couple of coats of water poly and then I expect to eat some biscuits at it... guess I should inform daughter!;)
 
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