Drill Press Question

Tman

Tman
User
Hello everyone!

I just picked up a used drill press that had semi torn belts. I was able to lessen the tension on the motor pulley but have no clue how to pull the idler (center) pulley from place or lessen it's tension to put on a new belt on.

All the videos I saw online showed the idler pulley easily pulled up from place and is kept down by gravity. I tried everything to pry/wiggle that pulley up but to no avail and don't to put too much force and break something

Any ideas?
 

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Raymond

Raymond
Corporate Member
If you can't see or find the center pulley mount bolt, the only option I see is to loosen the motor mount bolts and tilt the motor enough to put the new belt on.

Someone on here may have a better idea or experience with that make and model of drill press.
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
It should be mounted on an arm that allows it to swing from front to back. It may be rusted or stuck. Try tapping with a rubber mallet to loosen the arm.
 

tvrgeek

tvrgeek
User
Idler arm should be loose. That is the same design as 99% of them out there.

Go for the cogged series belts and be aware, measure carefully as Chinese belts may have a standard marking, but can be incorrect. It took several tries to get belts on my Delta. The difference is in the measurement being outside length vs running length.
 

Michael Mathews

Michael
Corporate Member
I believe this is what Mike is trying to say:
You can see the weld on the plate where the pivot pin is attached at the end of the red line.
The green line should be the direction of the pivot around that pin.
1590140187959.png
 

Tim Sherwood

Tim
Corporate Member
Once you get the pivot point loosened, you will probably have to loosen the motor in it's mount. It should slide an inch or so to get you some more slack. Then after the new belts are installed , slide the motor backward with a lever to tension the drive belt.
 

Tman

Tman
User
Thank you all for the help, advice and illustrations. I didn't have penetrating oil so made a cocktail of vegetable oil and acetone and let it soak overnight. Worked like a champ after some taps.

Now gotta find new belts. The belts that came with it are V A25 and A23.

I went to HF to get that green Link belt but it doesn't look like it's the same size.
 
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ScottM

Scott
Staff member
Corporate Member
Thank you all for the help, advice and illustrations. I didn't have penetrating oil so made a cocktail of vegetable oil and acetone and let it soak overnight. Worked like a champ after some taps.

Now gotta find new belts. The belts that came with it are V A25 and A23.

I went to HF to get that green Link belt but it doesn't look like it's the same size.
Since you are in Cary try Northern Tool or Tractor Supply or an auto parts store for your belt. HF would not be the first stop on my list.
 

Charlie

Charlie
Corporate Member
Agri-Supply on Hwy 70 in Garner has a very good selection. I picked up a 25" yesterday for $2.67.
Take the old ones with you.
 

tvrgeek

tvrgeek
User
Again, be very careful reading the belt sizes. Chinese belts are marked incorrectly from the standard!
I also suggest the cogged style ( AX series) as the pulleys on the drill press are smaller than the belt manufactures spec. I actually need three belts to cover the full range.
A series measure the working length, L series the outer length. He Chinese seem to confuse this. I only run Gates and Dayco belts. Wuality of the splice mostly.
 

Tman

Tman
User
Thank you all! i ended up getting belts from autozone! oreilly/advanced auto/tractor supply didn't have the size i wanted. The belts were a little tight, maybe because they are new. I had the motor all the way in (no tension) and i had to pry the belt over the motor pulley to get it in, not much just a little.

Got a wire wheel for my angle grinder. Thinking of removing some of the surface rust and sealing with something? oil or paint?
 

tvrgeek

tvrgeek
User
Yes, new belts are a little tight. Cogged I hope. I gather you are talking about the post and table as they are raw. Usually oil on the post and my table gets enough oil from work. The head casting is painted. Quill is oiled.
 

Tman

Tman
User
Yes, new belts are a little tight. Cogged I hope. I gather you are talking about the post and table as they are raw. Usually oil on the post and my table gets enough oil from work. The head casting is painted. Quill is oiled.
I tried cogged but no one had cogged that fits. There is a lot of gunk on metal joints so will clean, grind lightly and blo!
 

tvrgeek

tvrgeek
User
The issue with these drills, all virtually the same differing mostly in machining quality, is someone forgot to look up the specifications of the belts they used.
An AX trends to rub a bit better on the small puly than the 4L. Both spec minimum bulley to be larger than the smallest one on our drills.
If you look up specs on all the drills, you will see some of the more reputable brands do not run as slow as others. Well, they used a larger pully not violating the belt spec! A big set of tradoffs trying to get 3 sheaves to all use the same 2 belts and fit on top. Turns out it has comprimizes.

Do NOT add grit to the pulleys and belts. Clean and proper tension is all that is needed.

Here is an overview of belts. OEM sited will give the specifications in detail. Yea, I did a little research rather than just using what a local store had.
 

Woodman2k

Greg Bender
Corporate Member
clean up the mess inside the belt area, having that overheated rubber belt material blowing around and breathing it in won't be good for you. For the most part the belts don't have to be that crazy tight in the relaxed position, some of the old Craftsman DP had the equivalent to 3/16 cord for belts and two of those machines are still running like a top where I used to work.
 

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