Cutting Down Trees

Status
Not open for further replies.

CLetts

New User
Carl
I'm not used to cutting down trees specifically for milling, but there's this "warning" in the back of my head that there's a "best time" of the year to do this. A friend of mine has cherry and walnut trees that he needs removed and he's offering me the wood. They don't need immediate removal so I thought I'd ask for advice. (Before I cut them down I will be making arrangements with a mobile sawyer so that they're not on the ground more than a few days. I also have anchor lock to paint the ends.)


Thanks in Advance for any advice!!

-Carl

P.S. I'm leaving for VA. late tonight and won't be returning until the 19th or 20th so if I won't be able to respond to any questions or comments until then.
 
Last edited:

JimD

Jim
Senior User
I was curious so I googled it. I found one article that said it doesn't matter. Moisture content is the same year round. Fungal issues are less in winter but only because the funguses grow slower in winter. The also speculated that sawmills tend to be busiest in the fall and have more time on their hands in late winter when it may not be possible to get trees out of some properties. That sounds like a regional thing. They also said that the bark comes off easiest in the spring because the tree is making more sap wood at that time.
 

CLetts

New User
Carl
Googled it?!:BangHead: That never occurred to me for some reason! :BangHead: Thanks for the help!!

-Carl
 

scsmith42

New User
Scott Smith
For species prone to stain (pine, holly, maple, etc), winter harvest and milling is best because it discourages the development of stain.

If logs are going to sit for weeks or months before milling, winter cut is also best due to reduced bug activity.

For logs destined for 8/4 or thicker air dried lumber, winter milling is best because when the air drying process is started at a lower temperature, there is less potential for surface checking and other drying related defects.


Scott
 

richlife

New User
Rich
Other than what has been said, the best time is after any leaves have fallen. They are a mess in themselves and, if there are other trees nearby that their crowns may brush against, enough friction can be caused to break limbs or even pull down another tree.

I learned this the hard way. When I had to take out so many trees earlier this year, I made sure I waited until the leaves were gone in January. It's amazing how much safer it is when there is only bare limb to bare limb contact.

Rich
 

chris_goris

Chris
Senior User
Other than what has been said, the best time is after any leaves have fallen. They are a mess in themselves and, if there are other trees nearby that their crowns may brush against, enough friction can be caused to break limbs or even pull down another tree.

I learned this the hard way. When I had to take out so many trees earlier this year, I made sure I waited until the leaves were gone in January. It's amazing how much safer it is when there is only bare limb to bare limb contact.

Rich


+1 on this comment! Not to mention much cooler weather to work in!
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Our Sponsors

LATEST FOR SALE LISTINGS

Top