Cross banding help

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mshel

New User
Michael Shelley
I am getting ready to start a project which requires cross banding the veneer around the outside edge. This is something I haven't done yet and would like to know if any of you have done this? The top will be veneered and the cross banding will be applied after the main field is dry. This will require routing / cutting or whatever to reveal the substrate to allow the cross banding to merge with the main field. I have thought about using a marking gage with a knife point to score the band around the perimeter and then using a plung router to remove all the waste area. Is this a viable method? Anyway, any help would be appreciated.

Mike
 

D L Ames

New User
D L Ames
Mike,

First off........how is the new business going?

Just for my clarification. Is this cross banding going to be added to the top of the veneered top just along the outside edge or to form a rectangular area within the top? I am just not familiar with the term cross banding.

D L
 

mshel

New User
Michael Shelley
D L Ames said:
Mike,

First off........how is the new business going?

Just for my clarification. Is this cross banding going to be added to the top of the veneered top just along the outside edge or to form a rectangular area within the top? I am just not familiar with the term cross banding.

D L
The cross banding will be satinwood which will accent the mahogany veneer main top. I might be making this harder than it will end up being. Cross banding is when the main field grain goes one way, and the accent banding goes the opposite direction. The banding will be around the outside edge of the table. I am toying with the idea of putting a small strip of holly inlay between the mahogany and the satinwood but that may be more than I can bite off this time.
 

mshel

New User
Michael Shelley
Forgot to mention, for the first week, things are ok, still trying to get things organized and functional. What with all the permits, bank accounts, signs, etc. not getting too much accomplished. Next week will be all work.

Thanks for asking.
Mike
 

D L Ames

New User
D L Ames
Mike, sounds like there is a greater PITA factor involved with starting up a business on your own than I was aware of. Best of luck with everything.

Okay, I understand what you are doing now in regards to cross banding and the technique you proposed to add the cross banding sounds feasible. Let me add a little food for thought for you but before I toss my $.02 on the table let me add this disclaimer: I have some, but very limited experience working with veneer and by no means am I anywhere close to being an expert.

I am not sure if what I am going to offer up is even feasible since I am not sure how large of a table top we are talking about or how far along in the assembly process you are.

Assuming your top is still a flat, oversized, unassembled piece of substrate (plywood?). Why couldn't you prepare all of your veneer by cutting your infield mahogany to it's final size, cut all of your satinwood banding to width (or slightly wider) and miter (I assume) the corners of the cross banding. Once everything is cut to size then use veneer tape to assemble all of the pieces together prior to glueing it to your substrate. If you leave your substrate (and banding) oversized then you could trim the veneered panel to size on the TS. Of course you would have to ensure that when you glue your veneer down that you align it squarely with your substrate.

What type of adhesive are you planing to use? Contact, PVA, hide glue? I recently purchased a small (24 x36) Vacu-clamp system that works off of my compressor and love it. I used Titebond's cold veneer press adhesive and it worked great for some small panels I was veneering. I have a couple of photos in my album if you want to see them.

Well, there lays my two cents. Hopefully everyone else will add in theirs and you will have enough to buy yourself a cup of coffee as you ponder your project.

Have a Happy Thanksgiving,
D L
 

Phillip

New User
Phillip Fuentes
mshel, i've done narrow crossbanding the way you described. score with a marking gauge, then rout for the band. the only difficulty is setting the router for that tiny depth. once you have the area clear, you can use clear packing tape to put down small pieces of the crossband, stretching the tape as you apply it. the tape comes off pretty easily with a cabinet scraper (#80 or similar) and maybe a little alcohol for stubborn adhesive. if you use tape to hold the veneer down remember not to have too much overhang or pressure at the edge may flex the veneer up just inside of the edge preventing a good glue bond. for a really wide crossband, 5 or 6 inches, you may be better off cutting the field to size and attaching the band to it oversize and trimming the whole panel later, as was suggested earlier i think. good luck.

phillip
 

mshel

New User
Michael Shelley
Thanks for the info. I think I will practice on some mdf or something before I go cutting into the real thing. As you know, routers are not very forgiving and I want to be sure of the depth setting b4 I go for the real deal. Wish me luck.


MIke
 
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