Clark Drill Press

Rob in NC

Rob
Senior User
Hope all had a great Thanksgiving. Was wondering if anyone had any information on a Clark 644 Drill Press. I picked this up locally from a fellow who said he was offloading it because he couldnt find any info or parts if needed so I got it cheap. It's a floor standing model, very heavy. Has served me well now for several years.
I have found Clarke (with an 'E') but I can find no info on this model.

Anyone ever hear of it?
 

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Rob in NC

Rob
Senior User
Interesting... so perhaps Clark was a reseller or rebranded it?
1945... wow. It looks it, too... but still runs and works. I use it every time I'm in the shop.

Thanks much! I've asked around here locally and no one had a clue.
 

Rob in NC

Rob
Senior User
I'm not sure. I've looked off and on now since I got it and come up short. The info from Mr. zdorsch is as close as I've gotten
 

Rob in NC

Rob
Senior User
That's gotta be it! Same design for 'clark' Very interesting.... So imagine that press has seen a ton of use! Hopefully will see a ton more, too.
Thanks all. Less than 3 hours after posting, I know more about this press than I have since owning!
 

Craptastic

Matt
Senior User
I'm with Hank. The A over the L is the old logo for Clark Material Handling Company. You probably have a machine that was sold off from one of their shops.
 

Hmerkle

Board of Directors, Development Director
Hank
Corporate Member
I think it is a Rockwell DP-600 (DP Drill press, not sure what the 600 is for)
as @zdorsch said the serial is from 1944 (ser. 26-6901 to 33-6900) yours is 33-6526

This will be a lot of fun!
 

Rob in NC

Rob
Senior User
I think it is a Rockwell DP-600 (DP Drill press, not sure what the 600 is for)
as @zdorsch said the serial is from 1944 (ser. 26-6901 to 33-6900) yours is 33-6526

This will be a lot of fun!
8526 so should be 1945 But if it's a DP-600 at least now I can look for parts, if needed!
 

zdorsch

Zach
Senior User
Glad I could help!

Someone that knows more about this particular press will hopefully chime in, but I think it’s a 14” (DP 220). Does it happen to have any numbers on the left hand side (opposite from the serial number side)?
 

Rob in NC

Rob
Senior User
Glad I could help!

Someone that knows more about this particular press will hopefully chime in, but I think it’s a 14” (DP 220). Does it happen to have any numbers on the left hand side (opposite from the serial number side)?
I saw no other obvious markings on it. I'll give it a closer look tomorrow. I dont think there is, though. Just amazing to me that within hours, yall come up with answers. Means yall are really sharp, or just really old! :p
 

Rob in NC

Rob
Senior User
I think it's really cool, but much of it is lost on me. I just need and want it for a regular drill press. Would make a nice restoration project, but that's not my thing.
 

bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
Glad I could help!

Someone that knows more about this particular press will hopefully chime in, but I think it’s a 14” (DP 220). Does it happen to have any numbers on the left hand side (opposite from the serial number side)?

That's it. Look on the left hand side of the drill press. DP 220 should be on the casting.
Lots of info on owwm.org Just put DP220 in the search box after you get some popcorn. Millions were made.
 

Rob in NC

Rob
Senior User
Thank you, sir. I didnt even realize. I'll have to look at some pics to see where it goes. I've not missed it all these years. Go to the mill when I need a stop
 

bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
(Edit) I missed seeing Zach's link above. Same publication.
The stop collar keeps the quill's gear rack from rotating on the pinion gears of the operating handle. This allows for a smoother downward action.
Here's a pdf on a publication Delta put out in 1948 that features the DP220. At the time that press was relatively inexpensive, durable, and accurate enough for production work.
 

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Rob in NC

Rob
Senior User
The stop collar keeps the quill's gear rack from rotating on the pinion gears of the operating handle. This allows for a smoother downward action.
Here's a pdf on a publication Delta put out in 1948 that features the DP220. At the time that press was relatively inexpensive, durable, and accurate enough for production work.
That makes sense. I notice that there is a section that spins freely and I had no idea why. There is a large indent in it and I assumed there may be a grub screw in there that needed tightening, but no. Thank you, sir!
 

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