Bridal Chest Lid

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jg2259

Jim
Senior User
Over a year later, I'm still working on the bridal chest that was supposed to be a wedding present for my son and his wife.
The chest has been done for over 8 months, and I've been juggling it between my 2 benches.
My problem is the lid. This is the third lid I've built, and I screwed it up too, but I really don't want to build a fourth. I won't bore you with the mistakes I made, but this last lid is solid wood, which potato chipped on me, even after taking all the precautions ( acclimating the wood before milling, milling in steps over a few weeks time, only removing small amounts from both sides each time, etc.)

After hand planing the final glue up ( 24" x 45")I ended up with a lid a little better than 5/8" thick. It does not look right on the chest.
My plan is to glue my 2nd attempt to my third attempt, gluing the worst side of 2nd lid to worst side of 3rd lid, to give me some thickness.
The 2nd lid was made from veneered 3/4" mdf with a mahogany frame. The 3rd lid is solid mahogany 5/8".
Do any of you foresee any issues with my plan?
Any and all guidance and direction is welcome, as well as criticism. You can't hurt my feelings or pride any more than I've hurt them myself!!!

Thanks,

Jim


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Henry W

HenryW
Senior User
Jim:
Flat lids? Frame and panel? Coopered?
I can't quite tell which type of lid you are trying to make. Could you add some detail?

Henry
 

Bill Clemmons

Bill
Corporate Member
If you glue the 3/4" MDF to the 5/8" solid mahogany, face to face, the two pieces are going to move differently. Actually the MDF won't move, and the mahogany will move considerable. My guess is the two will separate or split fairly soon. Its one thing to glue like species together, as they move fairly equal. But two different species is asking for trouble, in my opinion.
 

KenOfCary

Board of Directors, Treasurer
Ken
Staff member
Corporate Member
I agree with the others that you'll be looking for trouble if you combine materials in a single panel. Unless you use a rail and stile frame with an inset panel that can move or the frame can move around.

For hinges on a chest I like these torsion hinges. They are an all-in-one solution. They keep the lid from slamming shut and hold it open in about any position. Get the proper size for the weight of your lid.

http://www.rockler.com/lid-stay-torsion-hinge-lid-support-satin-nickel

I used them on the blanket chest that I made for my nephews wedding present and they were easy to install and worked very well.
 

Roy G

Roy
Senior User
Have you tried bread board ends? Or attach a cleat along the bottom to hold the lid flat?

Roy G
 

jg2259

Jim
Senior User
Roy, I was going to either use breadboard ends or battens to flatten the lid, but at only 5/8" thick, it looks terrible on the chest. I need more thickness.
Looms like another redo.




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Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
How about pictures of your bridal chest so far without a top. Then add "a top" and a few more pictures.

How should it look in your mind's eye. I'm guessing that you want a top that is about 3/4"-1" thick and 24" x 45". Breadboard ends or battens will work, but your pics above look like a frame and panel. Is that what you want?


 

jg2259

Jim
Senior User
The veneered lid is 3/4" mfd with a mahogany frame but the frame is just glued to the mdf, no slots or biscuits or dowels. The solid wood lid is 3/4" mahogany which is now 5/8" and still bowed. It looms like crap on the chest. Putting molding around perimeter of lod will be difficult as there is only 9/16" overhang, not giving much to hold on to with a profiled molding under it.
Putting the molding on the chest will also be difficult, because the chest is finished. I really dont want to use the 5/8" top anyway because of how thin and light it is.



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jg2259

Jim
Senior User
My first attempt at a lid was with the same ribbon strip quarter sawn sapele that the frame of the chest was made from. I ran out of that stock and could not source any more locally.

So I ordered the ribbon stripe sapele veneer for the mdf and it turned out great. Then I sanded thru the veneer. Whoops!!!
So I toiled for hours learning how to make a corner fan from veneer. Ok. Finally got it. Was routing out for the corner fan and went outside the line by about 1/4". There goes that lid to @($:$:"($.
Now the potato chipped lid made from the african mahogany that the panels on the chest are made from


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Jeff

Jeff
Corporate Member
I think that you're overthinking it and your construction. Geez, it's only a top for a chest, but I know that you want it to look right.
 

Mike Wilkins

Mike
Senior User
Now is a good time to consider veneering. I built a cherry blanket chest with breadboard ends, but the main panel is MDF with a cherry veneer. Built about 10 years ago for the youngest daughter, and I have visited the chest many times since, with multiple moves. Still flat and no warpage at all.
 

dwminnich

Dave
Senior User
Jim, if I'm understanding your description correctly, the third lid is fine, but appears too thin for the proportions of the chest... Right? I don't know that you'd really be happy with a thicker top, but how about inserting your #3 top as a floating panel in a frame of 1" (or whatever thickness suits you) solid lumber? That gives the appearance of a thicker top while preserving the investment of your time and wood on the current top.


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Last edited:

JGregJ

New User
Greg
I was thinking along the same lines, use that thin panel along with frame of thicker material. The chest already is panels, why not make the top with a frame approach as well.
 
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