Bandsaw lubricant

Wannabe

New User
Vic
Relatively new bandsaw user here. I've been researching on using bandsaw lubricant and have encountered some conflicting opinions on whether to use it or not. If you do use it, what type do you use, why and how best to apply it. Same for the reasons of not using it. All links, comments, and suggestions are encouraged and welcome. Thanks for your valuable time, stay safe and healthy.
 

bob vaughan

Bob Vaughan
Senior User
What's the situation with the band saw and stock? Is this for general wood cutting in a recreational woodworking shop?
What's the intended result of the "lubricant"?
I've never heard of or seen any lubricants used on the blade in a general woodworking shop.
I would think it would make a mess.
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
I have seen it used on metal cutting bandsaws that are equipped handle it but never on a wood cutting bandsaw.
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
My bandsaw has permanently lubricated sealed bearings so no extra needed there. Some older ones may need bearing lube. In that case I would use a dry spray lube.
 

Phil S

Board of Directors, President
Phil Soper
Staff member
Corporate Member
I have a Hammer N4400 and a MiniMax S45N. I have never lubricated either
 

Wannabe

New User
Vic
What's the situation with the band saw and stock? Is this for general wood cutting in a recreational woodworking shop?
What's the intended result of the "lubricant"?
I've never heard of or seen any lubricants used on the blade in a general woodworking shop.
I would think it would make a mess.
Bob, I was referring to a wood bandsaw. After speaking with a friend of mine, he did mention that a lubricant is only used on a metal cutting bandsaw. Sorry that I didn't make clear on that point. As a person with a learning disability, it never occured to me that I was going in the wrong direction. Thanks for taking the time and effort to reply.
 

Wannabe

New User
Vic
I have seen it used on metal cutting bandsaws that are equipped handle it but never on a wood cutting bandsaw.
Mike, Thanks for taking the time to reply. After conversing with a friend of mine, he mentioned the same point as you. With my learning disability, I was going in the wrong direction. Stay healthy, my friend.
 

Mike Davis

Mike
Corporate Member
While you are here why not introduce your self and tell us about your shop and the work you hope to do.
 

Wannabe

New User
Vic
Are you talking about lubricating bearings or the blade?
I was talking about the blade. However, my learning disability prevents me from deciferring certain things. I have a wood bandsaw and I learned through my forum friends that only a metal cutting bandsaw needs lubricating. However, the blade needs CLEANING on occasion to remove pitch and other contaminates. Thanks for taking the time to reply.
 

Charlie Buchanan

Charlie
Corporate Member
I use CRC-336 on all my tools and blades—squirt on a rag and wipe down after use. Wipe on and wipe off. Doesn’t leave a greasy mess. My shop is not air-conditioned so it’s mostly for rust control.
 

Wannabe

New User
Vic
While you are here why not introduce your self and tell us about your shop and the work you hope to do. I
Mike, hope that you are safe and healthy. Back on 4/22/2020 I introduced myself under the forum "Who We Are". Anyways, I have a small shop, about 200 sq. ft. with some newer equipment. A table top drill press, router and table, oscillating table top belt and spindle sander, 6 inch jointer, 14" bandsaw and work table. I also have a miter saw, 12 inch thickness planer and hybrid 10" table saw. Those last 3 machines sit outside under a carport for the year b/c of limited shop space. Because of my learning disability, comprehension and skills and technigues needed for a quality and professional product, I only stay with projects that are small and made with soft woods. Thus, making a mistake, which is often, will not cost me (money and time) for making them. I never worked with wood until retiring about 3 yrs ago and do not have a mentor to spend the time teaching me the proper techniques. Woodworking schools are expensive and to distant for travel. In addition, I need someone with a great deal of patience and time. Feel free to contact me for any further comments. Have a great day!
 

Pop Golden

Pop
Corporate Member
On hardwoods I use wax. Find an old candle cut it in half and apply to both sides of the blade. Be careful when you do this. This is done with the blade running. Not too much a little goes a long way. A safer way may be turning the upper wheel by hand.

Pop
 

Bear Republic

Steve
Corporate Member
@Wannabe welcome, you have dozens of mentors here. Everyone is super friendly, helpful, and share their knowledge. Once this Covid is over we'll have workshops on lots of things to help you out, outreach events, and monthly lunch get togethers in some areas.

Sounds like you have a well equipped shop there to build your skills on. Just so you know most of us lose focus and make mistakes too. We usually call them "opportunities for design changes". ;)
 

sandfarm

Joe
User
I use my beeswax and mineral oil paste that I use for cutting boards.
I apply with a paint brush while the saw is running.
It really makes a difference cutting and it is a lot quieter.
And no, I never see any residue on the wood, but if there is, sanding, jointing, planing removes any.
Joe
 

gator

George
Corporate Member
I have used PAM cooking spray and not had any problems (finishing or otherwise).
 

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