3D printer for the woodshop

Bas

Recovering tool addict
Bas
Corporate Member
Does anyone use a 3D printer for woodworking-related items? I saw this video on creating a custom dust collection fitting, which was pretty slick. For some reason every router, sander, jigsaw and vacuum all have a slightly different connection, which is mildly infuriating. Printing your own would solve a lot of problems.
There's more of course - painting triangles, templates, bit holders, blast gates, the list goes on. Most of these you can make out of wood of course, but plastic can be better at times.
 

Michael Mathews

Michael
Corporate Member
Bas,
I've got one that I've printed a number of custom dust collection fittings. If you're in the market, check out the Ender (3?) Not sure what model they're on now. but it's a pretty inexpensive unit. I've had my Prusa for a couple years and my print area is about 250mm x 250mm x 250mm. Some are smaller and some are much bigger now. Feel free to ask questions if you have any more or PM me if you want.
 

KenOfCary

Board of Directors, Treasurer
Ken
Staff member
Corporate Member
I use my small 3D printer (about 6x6x6") to make custom DC fittings and other small items. Such as a custom holder to hang a tool on a pegboard. Lot's of small boxes for parts. I've also made dove-tail marking gauges at different angles that wrap around the edge of the wood.

Go to Thingaverse.com and search for tools or woodworking and you'll find hundreds of ideas and patterns.

I've also got a thread around here somewhere with pictures of some of the items I've made.
 

KenOfCary

Board of Directors, Treasurer
Ken
Staff member
Corporate Member
Like I tell everyone who will listen...... 3D printers are only useful if you can model your own parts.
Not completely true. Check out Thingaverse.com. They have many Scalable or parameterized models that you can make minor changes to the size of openings and such to customize your own parts from already done models. There are thousands of searchable models there. Mostly for free.

But knowledge of how to use one of the various CAD programs is certainly useful. I particularly like OpenSCAD as I am a programmer at heart and its interface fits my style of thinking. I am less of an artist so the programs where you draw freehand are less natural to me.
 

Dave Richards

Dave
Senior User
I've thought about getting one. I keep looking at them but every time I think I've decided on one, a different one pops up that catches my attention. I have made a number of models for 3D printing for others.
 

Phil S

Board of Directors, President
Phil Soper
Staff member
Corporate Member
We have a dual jet, where we can put two different color filaments and create a piece with a reasonable wood grain look. Plus you can order filament that is infused with wood fibers so you can print wood - I have a strong preference for real wood. The printer is driven off the SolidWorks platform and we are starting to learn Fusion360
 

Bas

Recovering tool addict
Bas
Corporate Member
Not completely true. Check out Thingaverse.com. They have many Scalable or parameterized models that you can make minor changes to the size of openings and such to customize your own parts from already done models. There are thousands of searchable models there. Mostly for free.
That is definitely the appealing part. I am not good with 3D modeling, visualization, compound angles, basically anything that's not flat. But downloading files, that I can do :)

The prices have come down significantly. Been looking at the Crealty CR-10S. Appears to be about as much turnkey as you can expect for a hobby machine, and with a very impressive print capacity. Biggest concern is that I need a new hobby like I need a hole in my dust collection hose. That and finding a dust-free place to print where my cats won't attack it.
 

Bear Republic

Steve
Senior User
That and finding a dust-free place to print where my cats won't attack it.
you can already do the perfect solution..... A nice square box! You'll want to make some windows in it. The printing can take some time and you'll want to look in on it.
 

Michael Mathews

Michael
Corporate Member
Hey Bas, check out the Snapmaker! It's got 3 modules for 3D printing, CNC Routing, and Lasering Engraving. It's got a smaller print base then some but it may suit your needs, plus you'd have the other functions. Oh, and it comes in 3 different sizes, I believe they are the A150, A250, and A350. Check them out! No affiliation BTW...
 

Mountain City Bill

Mountain City Bill
User
We have a dual jet, where we can put two different color filaments and create a piece with a reasonable wood grain look. Plus you can order filament that is infused with wood fibers so you can print wood - I have a strong preference for real wood. The printer is driven off the SolidWorks platform and we are starting to learn Fusion360
Phil, How do you like Fusion 360? I've been using Solidworks for 15 years but was thinking about getting Fusion for home.
 

tarheelz

Dave
Corporate Member
For those of you printing DC fittings, jig knobs, and small boxes; is this cost effective? I had assumed that even with falling printer prices, the filament costs would eat a man alive. No?
 

Yelverton

Mitch
Senior User
Lots of universities have free 3D printing labs for staff and students, if you happen to work at one. I do and I've printed many, many things for the workshop, all using models from thingiverse.com. Some I modified to suit my purposes, but there are a huge number of options, so chances are you can find something that works for you.
 

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